Adding a furry friend to the mix


#41

sure, i read your post. i was talking in general about Taiwanese who buy those breeds.

the local dogs are also adapted to this extreme environment. people who buy huskies here really need a brain examination.


#42

I think @ranlee and his Gf has an idea of what kind of dogs they like and find cute. I don’t think that’s wrong. If you’re going to pick an animal to care for for life, no issues picking one you like. I think he understands the situation of dog breeding and tuo goas. No reason for us to keep pushing it on him and his gf, And I’m guessing his gf has a lot of say on the dog.

I would say take your time and look around. Not all of us are saints and just pick the first dog at the shelter and take it home. He’s still adopting a dog so that’s a positive, doesn’t make you a bad person wanting a type of dog. But I agree that “pure” breeds are not what I would do. I do love corgies, but I find mix dogs much more cute and looks different.

Also, get a chance to interact with the dog and not just pick it by looks. Dogs have personalities and even with training, I think some dogs are just a certain way.


#43

It can be done or else only unemployed people and married people with a housewife could get a dog.

However you really need to spend as much time with your dog in the beginning and gradually train it to be ok with you away and gone for a while. Even with that, I think you still need to take your lunch break with the dog. In the beginning, your dog might be really distressed being left alone in a new place and getting used to you as the owner as well.

My advice is do not get puppies and very young dogs. Puppies need a lot of attention and care so do maor young dogs. They less control of holding in urine and poop when they’re young.

Are you able to explain to your boss that you just got a new dog and you might need a longer lunch break but can come. In early or stay a bit later?

Also, new dogs and youver dogs will probably chew stuff. You can’t just lock it in a change for a long time, but you can’t just leave it running around. Dog proof your house if it’s small. Or have a large play pen area. Have lots of toys and stuff. Get a Kong, loon that up and they’ll be distracted for hours. Can drop one off in the morning before you leave and one when you leave them after lunch.

Walk walk walk. You’ll need to walk them, I think it’s cruel when owners don’t walk them much. I walk them 4 timis a day. Some short some long.

I know you and the gf want a dog, but you two need to see if you can realistically take care of one, especially in the beginning when you need to care for it more and spend time before they get used to separation. Separation anxiety and be bad for dogs. But dogs can get used to being alone after a while. You can also consider getting 2 so it’s not alone. More work, but they’ll have a friend. See if your boss or your gfs boss can work something out and if they’ll understand your situation.


#44

nothing wrong with what i posted. i disagree with you on this andrew. buying a dog based on how cute it is doesn’t really work out too well in this culture. take a look outside. the ‘cute’ dogs are being carried around in prams, handbags and ridiculous baby rucksack things and we all know whats happened with the ‘non cute’ ones. its a fucking mess.


#45

I’m agreeing with you tbh. I didn’t say what you posted was wrong. I’m saying I think we made our point, and he knows about the positives and negatives.

I’m saying it’s probably not he’s final decision, seems like the gf had some pull. I’m not saying pick one purely based on being cute, but nothing wrong with picking one you like, all of this is based on how the dog looks from size, shedding, color, personality etc. I don’t think he’s the person to do what you’re saying.

I’m very anti “pure” breed to be honest, I don’t think it’s natural and the practice is kinda fucked up. But I’m saying he’s going to pick a dog he likes and he’s educated on the subject and isn’t just randomly buying a dog.

Like personally, I don’t like bulldogs. I think they look weird. I wouldn’t adopt one vs another dog I find more cute. Does that make me a bad person? I’m no saint, and I would to adopt a dog I like based on a variety of reason. I also don’t like bit or very small dogs. It’s just my preference.


#46

well i wasn’t really arguing for the tugous against pure-breds. more about cleaning up the existing stray dog problem vs making it worse. and i know the OP got what i said, i already responded to him.


#47

Disclaimer: Auntie Peng knows very little about dog breeds. I know either Akita or Shiba is smaller.


#48

Shibas are the smaller, cuter ones. Don’t feel bad, most people are confused about this.


#49

If you’ve ever seen a full-grown Akita, you’d know the difference. They are big damn dogs.


#50

We have completely different breeds in the old country. Cute little dogs so prevalent in Taiwan are rarely seen there. Most are attack dogs rather than guard dogs. So I`d rather have pram doggies, even if not ideal.

A medium size dog seems like a good compromise. Myself, I couldn’t own any dog smaller than my cats. Or bigger. Same size evens the score.

Plus I do not own a car, so doggie purse on the MRT it is. Ranlee would probably have to teach his to ride a scooter.


#51

My neighbor in the States had a beautiful, mottled-gray and white male Akita. Gorgeous dog. Regal. Owned his space. The forelegs were almost as big around as my wrists, and he was probably pushing 60kg, possibly more.


#52

We have here a very special Shiba for adoption, who needs a loving home:


(待認養/台南)

椪柑(圖左),豆柴犬,約7~8kg不會再大
男生已結紮,約2014/06誕生,全盲
更多關於椪柑:www.facebook.com/iluadopt
文字版送養文:https://ppt.cc/fwiyTx

拍攝日期:2018/02/16

Doggie is blind. Currently in Tainan.


#53

How is the dog suppose to survive being blind?


#54

With a loving owner.

He is healthy and friendly. He just needs a strong willed companion. He will give lots of love in return. He can still have fun and make friends and all.


#55

Can you leave the dog alone?


#56

Toto was blind and he did spend time alone. Of course, they feel more secure with an owner around.


#57

I really appreciate everyone’s advice. It has shined some light on aspects in which I didn’t consider initially.

Gf and I talked about it over break and we keep running into the issue that we can’t be there as much as we’d like. Ultimately, it’s me making runs to and from work during the work day to see if the pup is ok. It’s relaxed at work and the manager is cool, but it does delve into my work day and the prolonged lunch just means I leave work later.

I think I may talk to my parents about it and also see if my uncle is willing to help. My main concern here is that the dog may get confused as to who’s actually their master because its actual masters spend the least amount of time with it.


#58

I think that the issue is less whether the dog will be confused as to who his real masters are, and more whether you are comfortable with the way your mother or uncle would likely care for it. You and your gf would need to be comfortable with your mom/uncle being masters, too. The dog will be smart enough to work out for itself what the hierarchy is in the family, but as long as you are consistent with the way you exercise authority over the dog, then you will not lose your “master” status. The dog will simply have multiple masters. Would you be OK with that? I know some people who are very possessive of their dogs, and would not. But as I said, I think that the bigger question is whether you trust others to take care of the dog as you would. That takes a sit-down conversation with them.


#59

Thanks for the feedback.

My mom’s side of the family grew up with dogs, so they are familiar with raising one. How I see it is, if the gf and I adopt a dog, that means that he/she is part of the family, I wouldn’t have too much trouble trusting my elders with the dog as long as the gf doesn’t have an issue. We just both want what’s best for the pup.


#60

OK, then perhaps the real sit-down conversation is with your gf, and less with your family. You certainly don’t want sharing a dog within the family to become a source of friction. One way to reduce that risk is to encourage your gf to have activities with the dog that nobody else does, and maybe aren’t shared with your family. For the nine years that we had our poodle-share with my parents each one of us had different ways of playing with him, and took him to different places. He loved it, of course, and did not show any preference for one person over another. It simply never was an issue.