ARC's, Work Permits and Visas - what do you need to know?


#101

Update: I’ve made it to Taipei. It turned out that we didn’t need a return ticket. Customs never looked or asked about a return flight. We just showed them the address where were are staying. Perhaps our past Visas influenced their attitude towards our reasons for traveling to Taiwan. I was on the mainland for a year and my girlfriend for nearly two years. :discodance:


#102

Customs never checks for a return ticket. If somebody checks it will be the airline. They are liable (fly you back) if your paperwork isn’t in order and you can’t enter the country. In reality this check only happens about 10% of the time but it could put a major crimp in your travel plans. At least now with smartphones it’s fairly easy to book a ticket but before there were stories of travelers needing to buy overpriced return fares at the ticket counter or else miss their flight.


#103

Deleted


#104

I am currently working at a cram school and I have an ARC that is good until October 2015. If I change my job to work at a different school, do I need to pay more for another ARC or anything? I know I will need a new work permit but the school should pay for it, right? Also do I need to leave Taiwan?

Thanks


#105

[quote=“taywith11”]I am currently working at a cram school and I have an ARC that is good until October 2015. If I change my job to work at a different school, do I need to pay more for another ARC or anything? I know I will need a new work permit but the school should pay for it, right? Also do I need to leave Taiwan?

Thanks[/quote]

You definitely don’t need a new resident visa or health check and those are the expensive parts of the process. You can transfer your ARC to another school and I don’t think there is a charge for this. Work permits are cheap or free. It’s just paperwork. You definitely don’t need to leave Taiwan.


#106

hi. i’m going to apply my visa this tuesday. luckily i read this first. :smiley:
so theres some question.

i’ll apply for student visa, coz i already approved in MTC NTNU.
surely i will get student visa and ARC later.
but then i also would like to have a side job. should i apply for working permit in advance. or later after i arrived?
i’m afraid if i apply in advance they will think that my real intention is working. i’m araid they won’t give me any visa at all -_-

soo any advise? thank you :smiley:


#107

You can’t get a work permit until you have studied at NTUC’s MTC for one year. Don’t ask about or try to apply for a work permit when you apply for your visa. That will make them think your intent is to work and probably lead to a visa denial. You apply for this kind of work permit in Taiwan through your school, not overseas.


#108

After resigning from my buxiban job yesterday, I read on here that it is not good to resign before your new job has started processing your paperwork.

So, my old boss informed the Immigration office that I resigned and my work permit has been canceled, but now I’m worried if I’m allowed to stay here while my new boss submits my paperwork for a new work permit. What will happen?


#109

Go and get an extension from the National Immigration agency. They will extend it for up to six months in a situation like this. Hurry! Don’t wait from the time cancel your ARC. You should have at least a few days–the work permit is cancelled first and that usually take a week or so before the NIA is notified to cancel your ARC. See winklerpartners.com/?p=4697


#110

Ok, so I resigned yesterday, my boss told the Labor Office today, so I should go to the NIA in New Taipei tomorrow and ask for an extension saying I resigned from my old job and will start a new job soon? Do I need to take some proof to them? I haven’t signed a contract with my new job yet though, nor anything from the old job saying I resigned.


#111

Just go there ASAP and explain the situation and ask them what you need to do. They will help you. Additionally your new school should be able to call and find out everything that you need to do. You can get guidance here but the answers are with NIA. Contact them ASAP.


#112

Hi,

I am Filipino and directly employed here in taiwan but due to being my initial contract is less than 6mos(5mos) they just gave me a tourist visa before. when i got here my employer applied for my ARC valid up to this april 15 but no new visa was stamped in my passport. right now it is in the process of being extended up to oct 31 2015 since i’ve got a new contract.

my question is. I am planning to travel to Ireland this coming may via Taiwan - Ireland - Taiwan, leave already approved by my employer).

granting that i already have my extended ARC and Irish visa on my passport(will be sending my documents to dublin for visa application) by my travel date, do I need to have a new taiwan visa stamped on my passport or can I go back from Ireland to taiwan with just my ARC and not have problems going back from Ireland?

thanks,


#113

I don’t completely understand everything you said but your ARC should give you multiple re-entry to Taiwan. They might give you a exit and/or re-entry stamp in your passport but you don’t need to apply for a new visa.

Something seems a little strange that you didn’t get a resident visa in your passport when you went from a tourist visa to an ARC though.

Just to clarify - Do you have a physical ARC card? Mine has ‘multiple re-entry permit’ in red letters on the front of it.


#114

I’ve read it’s not possible to change from a working arc to student arc, without having to do a visa run. I’m currently a student myself with an arc, haven’t graduated yet, but would like to start work before graduating. I know students can work 16 hours a week with the part work time permit, but I’m hoping to start a full time job now.

In this situation, does one need to do a visa run or is it a matter of having your employer getting your work permit and modifying your residency status at NIA?


#115

Hi everyone, I have a question
! I used to hold a student ARC and work permit while I was going to university but I got married to an American who is an APRC holder. We got married while I was still going to university and I decided to hold on my student ARC even though I could changed my status then but now that I’m graduated and in other to stay in this country, I must change my status. Long story short, I got my student ARC changed to dependent ARC recently and I don’t know if eligible to work permit or not. I’m wondering if anyone has any idea about this process. If I’m eligible, Which forms do I need and where to apply the work permit?

sincerely,
Saikou Ceesay


#116

It’s basically the same as if you were unmarried as far as getting a work permit for you. If you were married to a Taiwanese citizen then you could apply for an open work permit. If you want a work permit then you must get a company to apply for it.


#117

Hello,

I have a question regarding this post, but may need to explain my situation first. I arrived in Taipei on jan15 and began interviews right away. after a couple weeks, I narrowed my search down to two. Both of these companies switched the original offers from full time to part time, but I found it a good opportunity to work both at a cram school and for an adult business english class. The former is more of my full time position- I have 14 teaching hours there, and work salary five days/week for decent wage. I signed a year long contract with them and have received my work permit. I have obtained my official visitor visa and am now trying to get my ARC. Do I need a different visa to stay longer than April 15?

My second, and more important question, is about my “business english” class. You mentioned that a person cannot work at two different places without permission. This is becoming a problem for me. I was given two different contracts by this company. One was a year long commitment to them, which only guaranteed that I would be their employee, but would not ensure me work. The second contract was for the company to which I would be sent to teach. The latter was a 2 month contract with points outlining my wage, my time/quality commitment, and the penalties for failing to uphold the contract. I refused the year-long contract, as it didn’t ensure me enough work to obtain my arc or work permit, but I signed the latter and have been working for the past month at this company without a permit. My supervisors have been contacting me this past week saying that I must sign the year-long commitment in order to get a work permit and be paid for my work. They are insisting that I sign the contract as is, and aren’t offering any reasonable information. As I mentioned before, the contract wasn’t agreeable, and still isn’t, and I don’t plan on signing it. Still, I don’t want to breach a contract I have already signed that has a penalty of $50,000ntd for failing to uphold. It seems that I have been working illegally for this second company for the past month, and haven’t been getting paid by th m on top of that. What should I do? Who should I talk to? Is there someone with the legal knowledge and who speaks English well enough to help me figure this out?


#118

[quote=“Jonathanlp”]Hello,

I have a question regarding this post, but may need to explain my situation first. I arrived in Taipei on jan15 and began interviews right away. after a couple weeks, I narrowed my search down to two. Both of these companies switched the original offers from full time to part time, but I found it a good opportunity to work both at a cram school and for an adult business english class. The former is more of my full time position- I have 14 teaching hours there, and work salary five days/week for decent wage. I signed a year long contract with them and have received my work permit. I have obtained my official visitor visa and am now trying to get my ARC. Do I need a different visa to stay longer than April 15?

My second, and more important question, is about my “business english” class. You mentioned that a person cannot work at two different places without permission. This is becoming a problem for me. I was given two different contracts by this company. One was a year long commitment to them, which only guaranteed that I would be their employee, but would not ensure me work. The second contract was for the company to which I would be sent to teach. The latter was a 2 month contract with points outlining my wage, my time/quality commitment, and the penalties for failing to uphold the contract. I refused the year-long contract, as it didn’t ensure me enough work to obtain my arc or work permit, but I signed the latter and have been working for the past month at this company without a permit. My supervisors have been contacting me this past week saying that I must sign the year-long commitment in order to get a work permit and be paid for my work. They are insisting that I sign the contract as is, and aren’t offering any reasonable information. As I mentioned before, the contract wasn’t agreeable, and still isn’t, and I don’t plan on signing it. Still, I don’t want to breach a contract I have already signed that has a penalty of $50,000ntd for failing to uphold. It seems that I have been working illegally for this second company for the past month, and haven’t been getting paid by th m on top of that. What should I do? Who should I talk to? Is there someone with the legal knowledge and who speaks English well enough to help me figure this out?[/quote]

The only and probably best legal advise is to not getting caught.

Here is the thing, since you already breached Taiwan’s laws, it doesn’t really matter anymore what contract you sign for that company as long you can have a visa and they pay you.
If you ever run into a dispute with them, your illegal work, even a day, will bite you in the arse preventing you from pursuing your legal rights without risking deportation.
Good luck!


#119

You probably better work that contract out until its expiry date, then regularize your position. Just hope not to get caught. Next time research the local laws a bit better: the fact that a work permit is job-specific is not a difficult piece of information to find.


#120

So I just found out my contract isn’t going to renewed in May which now means I need to look for another job. I remember reading somewhere that if my work permit expires or is revoked or whatever you call it then I can apply for some kind of 3 or 6 month visa extension while I look for another job. Can anyone confirm if this is true or point me in the right direction in this forum? I have gone through this forum but can’t find what I previously read about on this topic.