Climate Change - Impacts, Part II


#481

Why, what a coincidence. Your most recent graph reminds me exactly of the ones showing the sharp increase in CO2 emissions and atmospheric CO2 levels. Who would have guessed that even these are correlated! Thanks for sharing that! Cue: run for the hills? or is that anticipating your next post?


#482

So… . let me get this straight. You’re going to ignore an oil-price graph on the basis that it looks like something else you don’t believe in?

That’s mad, fred, even by your loony-tunes standards.


#483

As usual, I must once again remind you to reread what you, yourself, have posted. The TRANSITION to the low-carbon energy paradigm will cost $192 trillion. Again, after you reread what you, yourself, have posted, can you advise what the costs of NOT acting are? Again, by not acting, I mean the part where we don’t spend the $192 trillion to “transition” to the state of nirvana called low-carbon heaven.[/quote]

No, he wrote that correctly:

theguardian.com/environment/ … of-dollars

Further:

thinkprogress.org/climate/2015/0 … bank-says/


#484

Following up on the horrible bleaching incident of 2010 that killed around 95% of the hard corals of the Andaman Sea…

[quote]CANBERRA, Australia—An underwater heat wave is devastating huge swaths of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, marine researchers have found.

An aerial survey of the chain of 3,000 coral outcrops—a Unesco World Heritage site and the only living system visible from space—found 95% of its northern area, roughly half of the reef’s length, had been hit by a bleaching event that began six months ago. Damage to the southern area is still being assessed.

“This has been the saddest research trip of my life,” said Terry Hughes, a professor at Australia’s James Cook University and researcher in coral bleaching. “Almost without exception, every reef we flew across showed consistently high levels of bleaching, from the reef slope right up onto the top of the reef.”

Coral bleaching occurs when sea temperatures rise enough to kill the tiny algae that give corals their vibrant color. It can be a matter of just 1 degree Celsius, about 2 degrees Fahrenheit. Without the algae, the white skeleton of the underlying host coral is revealed and the organism begins to starve.

Bleaching has an outsize impact of the health of the oceans, scientists say, as teeming coral outcrops—though they cover just a small part of the ocean floor—support a quarter of all marine life.

The current bleaching event is global, the third since 1998. The first killed 16% of the world’s coral banks, according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The second was in 2002. There have also been local bleaching events, such as one in 2005 that wiped out half of the U.S. coral reefs in the Caribbean Sea.

The current event was declared by NOAA in October after a bleaching event in Hawaii. The World Meteorological Organization listed last year as the hottest on record.[/quote]


#485

An update on the coral situation:

‘And then we wept’: Scientists say 93 percent of the Great Barrier Reef now bleached

Been watching WUWT for a whisper about this, but nothing. Funny, since for years they’ve been mocking “alarmism” about exactly this inevitability. And for those who suggest it might some other cause, here’s something I wrote elsewhere:

Yes, crown-of-thorns starfish eat coral. Agricultural run-off affects coral adversely. So does sun-block. But do you seriously think that one or all of these causes suddenly ganged up on a couple thousand km of coral at the same time and killed all of it? Not only will every credible source you can check tell you this was almost exclusively because of water temperature, but since you don’t believe them, how bout this: people can SEE it happening. I went to the Andaman Sea in 2011 and found practically all of the hard coral at my favorite spot dead. Talked to the local dive shop and they said, yup, water temperature spiked several degrees celsius over a couple days. The coral lit up like Christmas trees as they ejected their zooxanthellae… and then they began to die. They didn’t get reports about water temperatures from NOAA… they saw them on their dive computers. They watched the coral light up, and then watched it all die. This happened over an area of water roughly the size of the nation of Turkey. Here is an official report of the incident:

Corals Bleached and Dying in Overheated South Asian Waters

Here’s a similar incident, also occurring now:

Warm oceans have left coral haven ‘95% dead’

Meanwhile, Mother Nature is once again conspiring with global warming alarmists - by providing them with more random climate extremes to unscientifically call evidence for climate change:

India crippled by extreme weather as 100 million exposed to floods

[quote]High temperatures and a crippling shortage of rainfall in India is forcing schools to close and communities to ration drinking water. In Chennai, the oppressive heat currently gripping the southern Indian city has led to workers demanding an allowance for working in stifling factories and vets offering advice on caring for pets to avoid dehydration. “While some rains would have been a blessing in disguise, the rain gods have ditched Chennai,” writes a reporter for Skymet, which provides weather forecasts in India.

It would have been hard to imagine such a situation four-and-a-half months ago. Following the heaviest rainfall in more than a century at the end of last November, the Adyar river – which runs through the centre of Chennai – surged, causing muddy water to pour over the walls of nearby apartment blocks and into the streets. Thousands were forced to flee their homes, and hundreds died.[/quote]


#486

[quote]‘And then we wept’: Scientists say 93 percent of the Great Barrier Reef now bleached
[/quote]
Good God. I’ve never even seen it. Now I never will.

I actually have a book called “last chance to see”, not specifically about climate change but about all the natural wonders that man is systematically destroying and that will - no if’s, but’s, or maybe’s - be gone in a few years or decades because nobody really gives a shit. Or, worse, because people like fred smith actually think it’s funny.


#487

Funny, no. Pathetic, yes.

Anyway, to remedy this we need to ACT URGENTLY and so I am setting up a foundation and need your $$$s now so that I can travel around the world to raise awareness of this URGENT ISSUE!!!


#488

Funny, no. Pathetic, yes.

Anyway, to remedy this we need to ACT URGENTLY and so I am setting up a foundation and need your $$$s now so that I can travel around the world to raise awareness of this URGENT ISSUE!!![/quote]

Interesting. Before, it was “skepticism” over “alarmism” over the GBR’s future. Here’s a sample of many many such posts:

Now, it’s as if you’d never expressed such “skepticism” and the destruction of an ecosystem thousands of km long is the most normal, natural thing in the world. I’m trolling the WUWT page on FB about this, and not coincidentally, their reaction is much the same.


#489

Internet Addiction Alert. Don’t fall off the wagon. Just say “no.” Don’t do it!

Gosh. You and others liked you have accurately predicted 29 of the last 3 such disasters. Good work! Well, we were told to “wait” for the Arctic to melt despite all the many cans being kicked down the road. This is an El Nino year with record temperatures and this is the third major coral bleaching since 1998. What happens in between? Does the coral recover? I mean the last two pants-wettings were the End of the Environment as we know it. So, now? how is it that 95% of the coral have bleached? or was it 95% of the remaining coral that the last two “disasters?” I just want to know so that I can wet my pants on cue. Thanks for your help. Also, I am setting up a Foundation for People Who Wet Their Pants When Hearing Sensational News. Would you care to donate some $$$s. As to all the other hyperventilating, this article had an interesting spin on the “Peak Oil Panic.”

nationalreview.com/article/4 … oversupply


#490

Internet Addiction Alert. Don’t fall off the wagon. Just say “no.” Don’t do it![/quote]

:blush: What can I say. There’s no hope for me.

Ummm…

2016 Arctic Sea Ice Wintertime Extent Hits Another Record Low

Please note the relative strength of El Ninos over the past century before you start trying to pass this off on El Nino:

Here’s the clearest explanation I’ve seen of the situation between global warming and ENSO:

Normal ENSO:

ENSO + Global Warming:

Well let me just check that for you:

El Ninos are coming on stronger, and closer together. How do you really think the coral’s going to be doing in say thirty years? And how do you think the ocean’s going to be doing, with warmer, acidified water and no coral reefs?


#491

I haven’t been following this thread but I read an article today quite relevant to it.

Earth getting greener due to rising carbon dioxide levels, global snapshot shows

[quote]Rising carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere have increased plant growth across the planet over the past three decades, a new study has found.

The most comprehensive modelling of remote sensing data so far shows the area on Earth covered by plants in this time has increased by 18 million square kilometres — about 2.5 times the size of the Australian continent — largely due to the fertilising effect of carbon dioxide (CO2).

“[The greening] has the ability to fundamentally change the cycling of water and carbon in the climate system,” said Dr Zaichun Zhu, from Peking University in China and lead author of the new study, which appears today in the journal Nature Climate Change.

Dr Canadell said the greening has surprised scientists who expected to see more browning, given the increase in droughts associated with global warming.

While the researchers found between 25 to 50 per cent of all vegetated areas of the land have become greener, only 4 per cent have become browner.

These included Mongolia, Argentina and areas of North America close to Alaska.

While south-eastern Australia also showed browning, overall the Australian continent was greening, said Dr Canadell.

While a greener Earth might seem like a positive from CO2-induced global warming, along with milder winters and longer growing seasons, he said there were many more negative impacts — including rising sea levels and severe weather.

“These will eventually outweigh by far any benefit from the greening,” he said.[/quote]

The study is available here.


#492

So now we have between 60 percent and 100 percent on 316 reefs. I thought 95% of the ENTIRE GBR had experienced coral bleaching. Your figures do not add up.

Don’t do it. Shut off the computer and go somewhere for two days :slight_smile:


#493

[quote=“fred smith”]So now we have between 60 percent and 100 percent on 316 reefs. I thought 95% of the ENTIRE GBR had experienced coral bleaching. Your figures do not add up.

Don’t do it. Shut off the computer and go somewhere for two days :slight_smile:[/quote]

Lol man do I wish. But I’m stuck here at work ask pretty sick to boot. Anyway, to clarify, here is the quote from the earlier article:

[quote]A survey of the chain of 3,000 coral outcrops—a Unesco World Heritage site and the only living system visible from space—found 95% of its northern area, roughly half of the reef’s length, had been hit by a bleaching event that began six months ago. Damage to the southern area is still being assessed.
[/quote]

Note that says “had been hit”, IE, showed bleaching. The 60-100% number was “severely bleached”, meaning basically it’s now dead limestone. Contrast with the previous two events, where 50-60% showed bleaching, but only 5% was severely bleached. This is a brutal event and sounds like the one is Kirimati is as bad if not worse. Heard Hawaii got hit as well but not sure how badly. I know the last big event in the Andaman Sea hit an estimated 97% of hard corals… I don’t know how much of that was severe, but everything I saw on the Kradan marine preserve was basically dead. It was horrific - like a burned out rainforest under water.


#494

Ah… now, it is 60% to 100% of the northern half… Hmmmm and that is for “severe coral bleaching.” Given the last two hysterias, I am guessing much of this will recover in time to be “bleached again” in 7 or 8 years so that the next pant-wetting episode can take place.


#495

“Now”? The quote I just re-posted was straight from the original post. I can’t help it if you read something different than what was said. Here are more specifics for you not to care about:

It’s worth noting that the northern section had been the healthiest and most pristine section.


#496

What did I miss?


#497

What did I miss?[/quote]

Nothing. That statement is correct.


#498

Well, here’s a sustainable solution, what with all of our art and culture grads… How about sending some dollars to sponsor this?

huffingtonpost.com/entry/und … 0245c893da


#499

I just checked the graphic above.

99+% of 522 reefs

  • 90% of 226 reefs
  • 75% of 122 reefs
    = 841 of 911 reefs bleached. IE, about 93%.

Better try a different line. The guys at WUWT’s FB page are back to, “The climate’s changed before” (which no one is denying); unfortunately, when it’s changed rapidly in the past, that’s usually accompanied by mass-exctinctions. Also, it hasn’t changed dramatically since the rise of agriculture, which arose -probably not coincidentally - during the recent period of climate stability.


#500

93% of what? the ENTIRE Great Barrier Reef?