Current duration of a JFRV?


#1

My JFRV is about to expire and I’ve lived here for 7 years now. My wife wants me to change my JFRV into an APRC, just because it is valid for 10 years. My question?

Is the length of a JFRV still 3 years?

Apart from the difference in length I don’t see any advantages of an APRC over a JFRV. We’re happily married, the name of my wife on my residence card is helpful with dealing with uncooperative civil servants and I don’t have to worry about the 183 day limit.

Another question. Is the APRC really valid for 10 years or until your current passport expires? Up till now my JFRV always was as long as the validity of my passport. Cheers for the help.


#2

JFRV ARCs are issued for a validity of 1-3 years. While the physical APRC is valid for up to 10 years, in principle permanent residence is for life and not tied to any residence purpose.


#3

So, if I get an APRC and my passport expires in 7 years, then what? Do I pay 7000 NT and after 7 years I renew for another period, or is it a 10000 NT one off payment for the rest of my time here in Taiwan?


#4

Again: while the physical APRC is valid for up to 10 year, permanent residence is for life and not tied to any residence purpose. 10,000 NT is the application fee for permanent residence, not for replacing the physical card.


#5

Clear now. Are there any costs involved for replacing the card?


#6

I think getting a new APRC for a new passport was free for me: it certainly wasn’t expensive. You just need to go to the office and fill out a form. They’ll give you a new APRC and if you pay a few NT they’ll mail the new one to your home, so you don’t need to go to the office again. I did this a couple of years ago and the government office was no hassle at all (although as always, getting to the office in New Taipei was a major annoyance).


#7

I just did this a few months ago. There was no fee to replace the APRC due to renewing a passport.


#8

Okay, then an APRC seems the better choice for me. Cheers for the help.


#9

Yeah, definitely. Especially if you decide to stay for good, certain benefits will not apply to you on ARC (regardless of whether the purpose is JFRV or work). For instance, senior discounts only apply to ROC citizens and foreigners with APRC. There are also certain discriminatory provisions in employment and pension law.


#10

Hmmm, I’m not senior yet, but slowly getting there. :wink:


#11

You probably qualify for naturalization as well, but that’s only viable if you’re willing to renounce your current citizenship or if you’re from a country that does not allow renunciation of citizenship. Or if you’re somebody with a list of special qualifications that the Taiwan government deems prestigious enough to give you Chinese nationality without the requirement of renouncing your current citizenship.
It’s best if you’re from one of the countries that allows simple resumption of citizenship for former citizens. Yay for Australia and the UK.


#12

Nah, even my wife doesn’t think it is worth it. We haven’t decided yet where we want to live after we retire, but it won’t be Taiwan. Then again, we might never be able to retire if the current turmoil in the world continues like this.


#13

And if the unthinkable were to happen to your wife? :hushed:


#14

Same here, no charge. Just the ID photos. But it took longer to have it in the mail as I expected.
Every time your passport expires, you need to get a new card. It’s actually dumb, they shouldn’t put your passport number in print on your card, just make a chip-card, this way they don’t need to replace it. And in fact the APRC is a goldmine for ID theft, everything needed is printed on the front of the card, lots of stuff not needing to be there.

I actually signed up for the Digital Citizen Card while applying for the new APRC, but the whole application thing is a mystery. Never got the card.


#15

An APRC has no time limit. Where do you get that BS from(10 years haha) ?
Do you have or have in your possession an APRC ?
I think not.
If a lie is repeated 10 000 times, it is still a lie.