debating on moving back to tw for my fiancee.


#1

I met my fiance while I was in Taiwan early this year and we are planning to get married in another year later or so. Unfortunately, she presently can’t leave Taiwan due to her family and job so we are on a long distance relationship
Seemingly, we don’t feel it will work long term so the only options are either I move back there or just call it off. The issue is that I had tried to live and work in Taipei before for about a year and had a difficult time landing a stable job due to my mandarin limitations…speaking level is ok but reading and writing is not. My fiance is aware of it and will help me build local connections while I am there to ease the transition and job prospects. Additionally, I do like Taipei city’s QOL and convenience over NY, so I am debating whether going back and deal with the potential struggle with landing a decent paying job will be worthy to grow our relationship…


#2

I guess I would need to factor in what you got going on in the states vs the realistic job prospects of being in taiwan.


#3

what is stopping her moving? does she have an amazing job or something? job prospects are definitely worse in taiwan.


#4

My wife and I were basically forced to have 3 months of long distance relationship. That was mainly for Visa timing + work, and she was in China while I was in Ozzieland. Both of us didn’t like it, so we moved to Taiwan together rather than prolonging the length of the long distance relationship.
We weren’t married at that time, and we never really thought about leaving each other, we just had to decide where to go together. The fact that you’re taking into consideration the idea of leaving your fiancee due to a long distance relationship to me is a fairly strong alarm bell, but that’s just my 2c.


#5

I have a deadend job with mediocre pay in the states and want to change careers. I am looking to take Mandarin classes if I relocate to TW hopefully run a business there eventually once my Mandarin improves.


#6

if you don’t have that much going on, why not at least be with someone you love and try things out here. Jobs market isn’t amazing here, but where is it really that great? At least living expenses are pretty low here.


#7

yes I agree. on point.


#8

In order to give helpful advice, we need more details.

[quote=“devasta00, post:1, topic:165184”]
The issue is that I had tried to live and work in Taipei before for about a year and had a difficult time landing a stable job due to my mandarin limitations…speaking level is ok but reading and writing is not.[/quote]

What kind of work were you looking for when you came before?

What kind of work do you want now?

Are you ABT, ABC, ABAsian or white/foreign face? This plays a big part.

What are your qualifications? What degree do you hold?

Are you willing to teach?

What kind of business do you want to open?


#9

I was looking for work in interior design and architecture firms last time I lived in Taipei while taught English on a part time basis. I am looking into jobs involving the tech sector in Taiwan such as Sales, programming, etc. I am ABT with an Associates Degree


#10

This.

There has to be a reason more than just job and family. You don’t have to share them with us, but I’m just saying, worth having a chat about it with your lady friend.

If your mandarin skills are lacking, that means you guys are communicating in English. Doesn’t this mean she’ll fare better in the states since she can speak/understand English? She could be more qualified to land a job in the states than you landing a job in Taiwan that’s not teaching English.

Get a bachelor’s degree. It will most certainly increase your chances of finding a white collar job. Not saying it’s impossible on an associates degree, but employers like to see 4 years of school behind you.


#11

@devasta00, listen to @ranlee , his is sound advice. :+1:


#12

Thanks @SuiGeneris

OP, I forgot to mention, if you’re an ABT, work your guan xi (關係).

Mom or dad knows someone who knows someone who knows someone, that owns a company, drives a Masarati around town and eats at hotel restaurants every night. They can afford the cost to hire you as a foreign worker and you pretty much have a job to get on your feet, you can’t be fired no matter how many times you screw up or if you don’t do anything at your desk. Trust me, I’m one of them

If the rents don’t know anyone, the gf knows someone who knows someone who knows someone. Somebody knows somebody.

The above plan will only work if you have that four year degree though! That’s so important! Your guan xi person might not care about how many years of education you have, but the local government requires it! Unless your guan xi has some guan xi at the national immigration agency, now that’s some guan xi.

Guan xi!


#13

#exposed

Will ranlee ever recover?


#14

He’s just admitted to being like most people. I think he’ll get over it.


#15

so you are the single parent dating guy? well if she has kid/s it doesn’t seem fair to ask her to relocate does it? seems like quite a big detail.


#16

Tons of jobs here that don’t require that you hua the Zhong. In fact, most of the better paying ones don’t.


#17

yes…one with a son:frowning: dated several before her but she was most compatible.


#18

can you give a few examples?:smiley:


#19

How about this: what is the latest industry in Taiwan? Where do they export to? You gotta know a thing or two about the place if you want to succeed here.


#20

I followed my fiancée here. Left a good job in the states to follow her here with no guarantee of a job, but I couldn’t bear losing her. So I proposed the night before she left, followed her a month later, got a good uni job, got married, and had a baby. I can’t imagine not following her and losing all that. You better make sure you love her enough, dude. Because if you do then the decision shouldn’t be a hard one.