Election results 2016


#41

[quote=“Icon”]The KMT is racist, the DPP xenophobic. We foreigners, until we reach a critical mass in numbers, must rely on ourselves.

The Taiwanese are clever and this bipartisan mambo won’t fly.[/quote]

Honestly, I prefer a racist over a Xenophobe if I had to choose one. They both suck however.

Racists feel a superiority over other races, they are proud in their misguided beliefs but stand behind them strongly. Racists can also be highly intelligent, see Donald Trump. Koreans are another good example, proud of their culture but dislike any outsiders disturbing their peace.

Xenophobes are just uneducated bumkins, the kind I want to get away from ASAP before their stupidity rubs off on me. They are the kind of nitwits you hear on the news telling the foreign workers that they are not welcome in their community because they fear they will bring violence, loud noise, and diseases, and then are stupid enough to go to the papers to show everyone their level of intelligence.


#42

[quote=“goingstrong”]I hope this continues to progress until we see pro-Taiwan vs pro-Taiwan parties in the near future. The Legislative take-over was historical and vital. Taiwan should be able to freely trade with the rest of the world and rely less on China. Less pro-China influence and corruption.

[/quote]

Except China ain’t going to roll over and let other countries trade freely with Taiwan. If I was in China’s position, I would move to stranglehold Taiwan’s trade if they made any move toward pro Taiwan independence. China isn’t ever going to lose face by letting Taiwan go. Leaving things the way they are works out best for everyone.


#43

Thank you!

Guy


#44

I expect the DPP wont be very foreigner friendly in terms of policies.
[/quote]

Why? Lots of progress was made under Chen.


#45

Of course, China won’t let it go easily. However, the Taiwanese will not stay placid and subservient any longer. It comes down to the will of the people and whether they can fully stand up against the bullying and intimidation scare tactics. :sunglasses:

(We, here in the US, are sick of China, but the move from “Made in China” to “Made in anywhere else” has been a slow progress. I know Trump will probably change that if he wins.)


#46

Following up on MM’s comment: yup, it was during the Chen era that we finally stopped dealing with the police to get residence cards/updates–they finally established a dedicated Immigration Office that was a gazillion times more professional and friendly. Some nice changes regarding residency policy happened during the Ma era, and for this I am grateful. But in almost every other respect I can’t say I will miss our current president once this man finally steps down.

Guy


#47

The cherry on top to all of this is that the local bentu factions loyal to Wang Jin-ping, derided as a fifth column by the deep-blues, did the best job surviving this tidal wave by a country mile.


#48

I feel touched, that in Taichung a “younger” woman has won a seat in the LY.
She is the sister of that soldier, who died in the military scandal 2 years ago.


#49

[quote=“afterspivak”]Following up on MM’s comment: yup, it was during the Chen era that we finally stopped dealing with the police to get residence cards/updates–they finally established a dedicated Immigration Office that was a gazillion times more professional and friendly. Some nice changes regarding residency policy happened during the Ma era, and for this I am grateful. But in almost every other respect I can’t say I will miss our current president once this man finally steps down.

Guy[/quote]

Yeah permanent residency and open work permits were a Chen era development. As was tourism, you know opening Taiwan to the world.


#50

[quote=“MoTi”]I feel touched, that in Taichung a “younger” woman has won a seat in the LY.
She is the sister of that soldier, who died in the military scandal 2 years ago.[/quote]

Yeah that’s excellent. It’s all the new blood and the success of new small parties that is the real signal if change in this election.


#51

The voter turnout rate is really low though…which is kinda sad.


#52

The ROC’s democracy has truly matured.


#53

To be expected I think as no sane person really doubted the main outcome.
Personally I think the best result was that the “White Wolf” scum Zhang AnLe’s unification party could not manage to get even half a %:
appledaily.com.tw/realtimene … 16/776954/


#54

I think many people already expected the results. It wasn’t much of a fight this election.


#55

Of course, China won’t let it go easily. However, the Taiwanese will not stay placid and subservient any longer. It comes down to the will of the people and whether they can fully stand up against the bullying and intimidation scare tactics. :sunglasses:

(We, here in the US, are sick of China, but the move from “Made in China” to “Made in anywhere else” has been a slow progress. I know Trump will probably change that if he wins.)[/quote]

Honestly, right now, Xi Jingping is probably more concern regaining control, and prevent economic problems right now. And Taiwan can really hurt them by having policies to move investments in China back to Taiwan. As much as China wants Taiwan, it all comes down to money.


#56

Eight years ago, the DPP lost by 17%. Yesterday it won by 25%.


#57

Your post implies that Taiwan has a state-controlled central economy. It is up to Taiwanese businesses whether they want to move out of China, and that is matter of numbers and not ideologies, national identity or who won the presidential election.

“Taiwan” as such can have policies that would encourage Taiwanese investors to pull their investments out of China. But would we really want the government to make wages competitive with those paid by Foxconn? And would you volunteer to drink 3 Americanos at Starbucks more just to make up for the Mainland China market if UNI-President was to end its master franchise there? Or would you want the government to compensate Taiwanese investors for their losses due to pulling out of Mainland China? If so, for how many years of lost revenue?

The dependency of Taiwan on Mainland China does not end with a DPP president and neither would it end with a “Republic of Taiwan”. At least not if Taiwanese are not willing to make economic sacrifice.


#58

Taiwanese companies are already moving out of China and into Southeast Asia as the cost of labor in China increases regardless.


#59

Your post implies that Taiwan has a state-controlled central economy. It is up to Taiwanese businesses whether they want to move out of China, and that is matter of numbers and not ideologies, national identity or who won the presidential election.

“Taiwan” as such can have policies that would encourage Taiwanese investors to pull their investments out of China. But would we really want the government to make wages competitive with those paid by Foxconn? And would you volunteer to drink 3 Americanos at Starbucks more just to make up for the Mainland China market if UNI-President was to end its master franchise there? Or would you want the government to compensate Taiwanese investors for their losses due to pulling out of Mainland China? If so, for how many years of lost revenue?

The dependency of Taiwan on Mainland China does not end with a DPP president and neither would it end with a “Republic of Taiwan”. At least not if Taiwanese are not willing to make economic sacrifice.[/quote]

Of course I know Taiwan is not a state controlled central economy silly :laughing: It’s not the soviet union here lol.

My Chinese is not good enough to understand political talks well, but so far, she doesn’t seem to have a exact plan or it seems ambiguous on how to pull more investments back to Taiwan. Perhaps tax breaks, or subsidization. I’m not sure. But it would really hurt the CCP’s grip on power and cause civil unrest if she does manage to do that.


#60

Well if you’re comfortable seeing your tax dollars move into the pockets of big business - think Terry Guo of Foxconn - for some political ideology…
I would rather see my tax dollars go into food safety enforcement and sensible housing projects a la Singapore.