Food scandal thread


#41

[quote=“headhonchoII”]The thing about Taiwan.

The really interesting thing.

Is the ability of people to ignore shit literally staring them in the face.

Then someday the Apple daily runs a story and people run around like headless chickens.

(1 month later)

See that shit over there!

Where?[/quote]

You mustn’t be the one to break social harmony, let someone else do it. People here seem to need to told what to pay attention to.


#42

[quote=“nonredneck”][quote=“headhonchoII”]The thing about Taiwan.

The really interesting thing.

Is the ability of people to ignore shit literally staring them in the face.

Then someday the Apple daily runs a story and people run around like headless chickens.

(1 month later)

See that shit over there!

Where?[/quote]

You mustn’t be the one to break social harmony, let someone else do it. People here seem to need to told what to pay attention to.[/quote]

Like a big inflatable duck, for example?


#43

http://www.taiwannews.com.tw/etn/news_content.php?id=2376501
Now the premium Taiwanese rice mixed up with the cheaper Vietnamese one.
Maybe we should start listing on this thread any new contaminated stuff or fake product. :slight_smile:


#44

[quote=“brobronek”]http://www.taiwannews.com.tw/etn/news_content.php?id=2376501
Now the premium Taiwanese rice mixed up with the cheaper Vietnamese one.
Maybe we should start listing on this thread any new contaminated stuff or fake product. :slight_smile:[/quote]

I totally agree. I’d be very happy to have a list of unreliable and deliberately fake products.


#45

Only tangentially related, but I thought this article brings home the sheer scale of the misuse of agricultural chemicals in Taiwan:

taiwannews.com.tw/etn/news_c … id=2423396

"…the Miaoli District Prosecutors’ Office charged the 39-year-old suspect, surnamed Wu, with violating the Agro-pesticides Management Act by bringing 147 metric tons of more than 20 different controlled agricultural chemicals into Taiwan at low prices since November 2012. He is accused of making illegal gains estimated at NT$13.75 million (US$454,200) as of the end of last year. "

147 f-ing tonnes of pesticides. And that’s just one guy, operating under the radar, supplying (presumably) just the local area. The total amount being sprayed around Taiwan must run into thousands of tonnes. Many pesticides are known to be persistent pollutants, carcinogens, endocrine disruptors, and the like: they are, after all, designed to be poisonous. This shit is in your food, your water, and probably the air you breathe if you happen to be in the vicinity of a spraying spree.

What makes me sick is that none of this is even necessary. Yet again, technology being used to paper over the cracks in a failed industry. What makes me doubly sick is that the authorities weren’t concerned about Wu’s toxic stash per se, just the fact that he made some money out of it.


#46

Ever try to sell organic produce that isn’t 100% perfect? Yeah, about that, change the consumer and you can change the farmer. He isn’t making money because farmers are dumb and stupid, he’s making money because people want the best they can get for as little as they can part with while lying to themselves or being ignorant of what it would take to actually meet their standard.
While I don’t agree with what he did. I know he isn’t the bad guy, just filling a market niche. All the ag extension people and farmers grow their own stuff organically. They’re not afraid of a few chewed leaves. Your average city A-ma, cook, or mom cares very much about chewed leaves, not so much about pesticides. Look at what people do and not what they say.


#47

taipeitimes.com/News/front/a … 2003584441

Of course nothing will happen as the right people will get paid off.

More worrying is this part though; they basically want to sue the press into silence:


#48

Wow. Just wow. 10/10 for sheer brass neck.

Mind you, I’d quite like to be called “tripod king”. :whistle:

The guys at the farmers’ markets seem to do just fine. :idunno: Anyway, pesticides are not used to make the produce look shapely: that’s achieved by the simple expedient of throwing half of it away, and/or polishing it, dipping it in wax, etc. Organic and chemical-fed crops all look much the same when they’re growing; the idea of pesticide-free crops being devoured by a cloud of uncontrolled pests is make-believe nonsense put around by the pesticide companies.

Pesticides are used in monocultures for the exact same reason antibiotics are used on feedlots: the design itself is inherently vulnerable to pests/disease. They don’t eliminate pest damage, but they reduce it to a manageable level - which is, in fact, approximately the same level of damage you get on a properly-managed chemical-free farm. The research is quite clear on that subject. Organic growers simply arrange things so that pest epidemics don’t occur in the first place. What tends to happen in a pesticide-free environment is that 80% of your produce will be absolutely pristine; a few varieties will get nibbled; and one or two will be devastated. It’s impossible to predict which ones will be affected, but it’s of no concern to the typical organic farmer who aims for a diverse output. The (high) profits he makes on the successful crops offset the losses.

There’s probably a healthy market niche for sawn-off shotguns and crystal meth, but I assume you wouldn’t defend that particular form of enterprise?

He is a bad guy. He has a choice in life. Nobody’s forcing him to sell pesticides; he could sell mobile phones, or party balloons, or lobsters. By doing what he does (I assume he got away with it for a good while) he is one of those people who is directly responsible for human and animal deaths and disease, and environmental disruption. All for no purpose. The products he is peddling have no useful function except to keep farmers hooked on dysfunctional ways of doing things. Having said that, it is partly or mostly the fault of government for permitting such things in the first place. The chemicals are, essentially, legal, even if they’re ( :roflmao: ) “controlled”.

As for consumer behaviour, I agree that most people don’t give a shit. There are many reasons for that, but the “we give the people what they want” argument doesn’t hold water. People want what they are told to want. The food industry has an enormous influence on the way people think about food.


#49

Yep. I worked picking apples once and the bad ones simply were tossed into another crate to be used for juice.


#50

Extra paraben means extra yum! :yum:


Strange News stories week of 12/8 regarding soy sauce?, water and a rolling car.
#51


The best part?

The company reportedly told investigators that it had been using industrial dyes for the past 10 years because they gave a more vibrant and longer-lasting color.


#52


The problem is with

winter melon-punch cubes (冬瓜糖磚) and sugar products

such as this:


#53

Pension reform!
#54


#55

What!!!
it is normal here -
so tasty


#56

Yummy. That’s the least thing to worry about with Taiwan food. At least it’s real food, not some industrial chemical or ingredients meant for animals.

I’ve been to the meat distribution center at 2 am in Wenhua and seen meat carcasses tossed on the concrete before they are chopped up into smaller pieces and distributed throughout Taipei. Have you not seen the little blue trucks with meat carcasses driving down the highway coming to Taipei at night? Not even refrigerated. And Taiwanese always says all the best fruit and vegetable is at the morning Market. It’s not true.

They might be fresh or not but it sure is dirty.

There are shops within a 4 minute walk from Taipei 101 that throw their meat and vegetables on the concrete and asphalt behind the shop to chop it up or just sit there for 3 hours before the nighttime dinner crowd comes.

Taiwan food is not clean and I only speak because I watch and I’m in front and behind the shops daily.

Taiwanese just looks what comes from the front on the plate not where it started in the back of the restaurant or even before that. Somewhere in their minds their parents told them and they believe it Taiwan food is fresh and clean but it’s not. I watch it I see it every day.


#57


#58

You have to feel that there is something very wrong about the business models here where restaurants can’t pay for veggies, and resourt to garbage diving to keep prices accessible -little flexibility in consumer prices, meaning most people can’t afford more expensive meals, whatever.

I mean, we call them greedy and stingy, but the whole system is at fault. The market sellers allow this to help peopel out, they probably think about those who have nothing to eat, no job, whatever. Yet the ones taking advantage are not them.

I was watching this news report about a restaurant in Yilan, wher eteh laoban takes 3 hours washing veggies leaf by leaf, until they are literally squaky clean. She said her employees can’tr believe their eyes when she does so. Why? they ask. That they even need to ask is a problem at social, educational and moral levels.


#59

Well, the responses with substance explain why I became so sick when I first came here. Had some really cheap foods, next thing I know I couldn’t even get up from the couch without… Well, I’m going to spare really gross details.

Surely these vendors have to realize that people are getting horribly sick from this BS.


#60

Many vegetables and rice is grown in industrial areas with polluted water. Lots of the west coast.

Drive around. Factories, smalll industrial buildings and farms, all residing next to each other, along the entire coast.

I’m scared of Taiwan food mostly because of what I have seen with my own eyes all over Taiwan, from the farms, fisheries, and noodle making shops in the yard beside the house, to the local street market down the road in Taipei or Chiayi or to the shops that throw their or beef or vegetables on the concrete behind the shop and chop it up… only partially from what I see in the news.