Hard to find work in Taiwan


#1

I find it so hard to get work in Taiwan.

So many resumes sent out but only a few reply back

Plus I’m not even in the country itself but my gf is there working.

Am personally working in Singapore for a sports media rights agency.


#2

Are you trying to find work in a sports media rights agency in Taiwan?

Maybe you should broaden your search.


#3

Hi Zender

I am trying to go to others like project managements and marketing.

Not necessary going to work for sports media rights agency.


#4

You’d better have a Taiwan mobile number and address. Then when they call you for interview you could fly there.
It will be harder to find well paid jobs in Taiwan, but I don’t think it hard to find a job per se.


#5

Hello headhonchoII

I do have a taiwanese address and number

But then still not much luck.

In all my cover letters, I did state that I am more than willing to relocate to Taiwan though

and my GF is starting to complain that we have a problem in our LDR.


#6

You get your resume translated into Chinese too? Even if you don’t speak Chinese it will help when they are screening candidates. Intentional expertise with English will be your selling point of course.
You applying for wide range of positions? Best get your ass over to Taiwan for a couple of weeks and try and get interviews lined up beforehand then just make it happen job wise.
Do not think you’ll get similar type role in Taiwan easily so need to be flexible and take what’s offered to get set up here.m and get an ARC.
Obviously you also should think about is this what you really want to do. If you like your current career and have good prospects I DONT suggest you move to Taiwan.


#7

If you’re currently in Singapore, expect a major hit in salary should you eventually relocate here.

I hope you can sort this out.

Guy


#8

[quote=“headhonchoII”]You get your resume translated into Chinese too? Even if you don’t speak Chinese it will help when they are screening candidates. Intentional expertise with English will be your selling point of course.
You applying for wide range of positions? Best get your ass over to Taiwan for a couple of weeks and try and get interviews lined up beforehand then just make it happen job wise.
Do not think you’ll get similar type role in Taiwan easily so need to be flexible and take what’s offered to get set up here.m and get an ARC.
Obviously you also should think about is this what you really want to do. If you like your current career and have good prospects I don’t suggest you move to Taiwan.[/quote]

Yea,

I got my resume translated into Chinese as well !

I been hopping over to Taiwan every 3 months or so, so I’m always trying to line up some interviews during my visits.

My current career ? Nah, not too much prospects. my working hours is from 0930 till 0100.


#9

[quote=“afterspivak”]If you’re currently in Singapore, expect a major hit in salary should you eventually relocate here.

I hope you can sort this out.

Guy[/quote]

Thank afterspivak !

This is something that I’m expecting, by taking a huge salary cut.


#10

If you come to Taiwan and see a nice laid back, Culturally Chinese, modern, convenient place with good food and are thinking that coming here will mean a trade off in quality of life for money, Im really sorry to burst your bubble. Taiwanese working culture is awful and working hours are long. At least in Singapore you will be renumerated well for your toil.

I could be wrong.

Alternatively, setting up a business here can be a good idea.


#11

[quote=“OrangeOrganics”]If you come to Taiwan and see a nice laid back, Culturally Chinese, modern, convenient place with good food and are thinking that coming here will mean a trade off in quality of life for money, Im really sorry to burst your bubble. Taiwanese working culture is awful and working hours are long. At least in Singapore you will be remunerated well for your toil.

I could be wrong.

Alternatively, setting up a business here can be a good idea.[/quote]

Haha, I’m not getting remunerated well for my long working hours.

Well, it is not as bad as the rat race in Singapore.

I’m thinking of bringing an Australian clothing brand into Taiwan.
I am looking into it though.


#12

[quote=“gaoxingdcf”][quote=“OrangeOrganics”]If you come to Taiwan and see a nice laid back, Culturally Chinese, modern, convenient place with good food and are thinking that coming here will mean a trade off in quality of life for money, Im really sorry to burst your bubble. Taiwanese working culture is awful and working hours are long. At least in Singapore you will be remunerated well for your toil.

I could be wrong.

Alternatively, setting up a business here can be a good idea.[/quote]

Haha, I’m not getting remunerated well for my long working hours.

Well, it is not as bad as the rat race in Singapore.

I’m thinking of bringing an Australian clothing brand into Taiwan.
I am looking into it though.[/quote]

But Taiwan is the ratrace. Working culture here is toxic and people are underpaid. Im worried you might have got the wrong impression about the place as a tourist.


#13

[quote=“OrangeOrganics”][quote=“gaoxingdcf”][quote=“OrangeOrganics”]If you come to Taiwan and see a nice laid back, Culturally Chinese, modern, convenient place with good food and are thinking that coming here will mean a trade off in quality of life for money, Im really sorry to burst your bubble. Taiwanese working culture is awful and working hours are long. At least in Singapore you will be remunerated well for your toil.

I could be wrong.

Alternatively, setting up a business here can be a good idea.[/quote]

Haha, I’m not getting remunerated well for my long working hours.

Well, it is not as bad as the rat race in Singapore.

I’m thinking of bringing an Australian clothing brand into Taiwan.
I am looking into it though.[/quote]

But Taiwan is the ratrace. Working culture here is toxic and people are underpaid. Im worried you might have got the wrong impression about the place as a tourist.[/quote]

Well I might be wrong but then rat race in Taiwan is not as bad as in Singapore and Hong Kong.

Here is a tldr post here, just my 2 cents worth of thoughts here. This is what I think after reading financial papers and keep track of Singapore and Taiwan fiscal year. (yes, I keep track of the market even I work in media industry, who won’t want to earn more money ? Heh…)

Underpaid is kinda of what the govt set its policies in it earlier years. The gross salary median has not increased in more than 10 years.

It was thought for most Taiwanese for more than two decades that the government and decision-makers have spent time preserving their own interests and in fighting the ideological warfare, instead of sustaining the economy. But after 1970s, Taiwan didn’t woo multinational companies like Singapore does, didn’t set up a financial hub like Hong Kong did or set up conglomerates the way South Korea did.

President Ma did not come out tops for his policies neither did he deliver his promises in 2008 when he won the presidential elections, taking back control from DPP. An annual economic growth of 6 per cent, a per capita GDP of US$30,000, and an unemployment rate of below 3 per cent. Youth employment rates is now hovering at 12 percent current (might be wrong, numbers could be lower from the time I read the article from the papers)

The economic-growth rate has halved every decade since the 1990s, and Taiwan’s gross domestic product (GDP) grew just 0.75 per cent last year. The government slashed the 2016 growth forecast from 2.32 per cent to 1.47 per cent because of subdued international demand for exports.

Taiwan spends 6 - 7 percent of the GDP for healthcare alone, pension scheme 60,000 NTD for retired civil servants plus a savings rate of 18 per cent. Pension scheme is set to rise to an all-time high of 7.37 per cent, or NT$147.2 billion in 2016, of the total government budget.

The overall lack of investment is also a problem. Domestic firms are conservative on investment, and are sitting on cash mainly because of the unstable political environment and industrial policy. Foreign firms face additional hurdles such as outdated regulations, strict labour policy, and cultural and language barriers.


#14

I have worked in Hong Kong. Taiwanese working hours are longer, Taiwanese bosses are worse, Taiwanese companies have less benefits and are stricter, Taiwanese companies have less vacation, Taiwanese companies have less space for development, Taiwanese companies are more petty and less international.

Im not sure what your definition is. Taiwan has its plus points, but dont think you will be getting a better quality or working life here. Honestly


#15

[quote=“OrangeOrganics”]I have worked in Hong Kong. Taiwanese working hours are longer, Taiwanese bosses are worse, Taiwanese companies have less benefits and are stricter, Taiwanese companies have less vacation, Taiwanese companies have less space for development, Taiwanese companies are more petty and less international.

Im not sure what your definition is. Taiwan has its plus points, but dont think you will be getting a better quality or working life here. Honestly[/quote]

Hmmm but then well, to each his own.


#16

[quote=“gaoxingdcf”][quote=“OrangeOrganics”]I have worked in Hong Kong. Taiwanese working hours are longer, Taiwanese bosses are worse, Taiwanese companies have less benefits and are stricter, Taiwanese companies have less vacation, Taiwanese companies have less space for development, Taiwanese companies are more petty and less international.

Im not sure what your definition is. Taiwan has its plus points, but dont think you will be getting a better quality or working life here. Honestly[/quote]

Hmmm but then well, to each his own.[/quote]
Dont want to burst your bubble or anything bbc.com/news/world-asia-16834258


#17

[quote=“OrangeOrganics”][quote=“gaoxingdcf”][quote=“OrangeOrganics”]I have worked in Hong Kong. Taiwanese working hours are longer, Taiwanese bosses are worse, Taiwanese companies have less benefits and are stricter, Taiwanese companies have less vacation, Taiwanese companies have less space for development, Taiwanese companies are more petty and less international.

Im not sure what your definition is. Taiwan has its plus points, but dont think you will be getting a better quality or working life here. Honestly[/quote]

Hmmm but then well, to each his own.[/quote]
Dont want to burst your bubble or anything bbc.com/news/world-asia-16834258[/quote]

That article was published in March 2012! And the report only mentions at least 1 work related death a year for a total of three “high profile” deaths! The report stinks of a labor union propaganda.

Anyways,beginning this year Taiwan has implemented an 8hours/day, 5days/week work schedule. That’s not bad at all!

You have mentioned you worked in Hong Kong, and working condition there is far better than here in Taiwan. And yet here you are working your ass off here in Taiwan? I honestly can’t see the logic there.

To the OP, keep sending your CV. Wishing you good luck and that you find a good paying job!


#18

How many companies in Taiwan are realistically going to keep to those guidelines? How many Taiwanese workers will report their boss to the government? How many white collar workers do you know here who are not exhausted?

I had a good opportunity here.

Why not just tell the truth and dont give false hope? There are good jobs in Taiwan and people can make it work here. However, on the main Taiwanese working culture, salaries and benefits is awful. I’m not saying it to be mean, its just the reality of working in Taiwan for most. I know a lot of Singaporeans and Hongkies get a wrong impression of Taiwan from watching TV or coming here in vacation.


#19

[quote=“dasaint”]
Anyways,beginning this year Taiwan has implemented an 8hours/day, 5days/week work schedule. That’s not bad at all! [/quote]

Ha, and what a joke that is! You want to know what difference it makes to me and every single other white collar professional I have ever met in Taiwan? Well, thanks to this governmental BS look-good move, we get to work three Saturdays this year - yep, days that were days off are now work days to “make up” for the government’s graciousness in changing a number on a paper.

Seriously now: in the years I’ve worked here my average word day has always been around 9 hours, and that’s because I don’t put up with as much crap as many of my Taiwanese colleagues and refuse to stay in the office half of the night if there isn’t a specific emergency that needs attending. All this time, the maximum number of hours per day allowed was 8.5, 42-hour week and no more. Do you really think any company on the island is going to give a rat’s ass that it’s now down to 8h/day - 40h/week?

Why would they, no one enforces anything here. I don’t completely dislike my job, and I love living in Taiwan, so I suck it up, like everyone else.


#20

[quote=“The boss of who”][quote=“dasaint”]
Anyways,beginning this year Taiwan has implemented an 8hours/day, 5days/week work schedule. That’s not bad at all! [/quote]

Ha, and what a joke that is! You want to know what difference it makes to me and every single other white collar professional I have ever met in Taiwan? Well, thanks to this governmental BS look-good move, we get to work three Saturdays this year - yep, days that were days off are now work days to “make up” for the government’s graciousness in changing a number on a paper.

Seriously now: in the years I’ve worked here my average word day has always been around 9 hours, and that’s because I don’t put up with as much crap as many of my Taiwanese colleagues and refuse to stay in the office half of the night if there isn’t a specific emergency that needs attending. All this time, the maximum number of hours per day allowed was 8.5, 42-hour week and no more. Do you really think any company on the island is going to give a rat’s ass that it’s now down to 8h/day - 40h/week?

Why would they, no one enforces anything here. I don’t completely dislike my job, and I love living in Taiwan, so I suck it up, like everyone else.[/quote]

EXACTLY!