How to get Taiwan Citizenship - Primer, FAQ, and Resources


#1221

Spring Onion wrote:

To be clear, does this mean that a married person with an APRC (i.e., not a JFRV but nevertheless married) must do the police clearance?

I second the call for this thread to be replaced. Not that I’m unwilling to read 122 pages, but it’s hard to know which information can still be relied upon. (Perhaps Tsai Ying-wen’s administration will order further changes–please, Amitabha, please!) Ideally the first post would contain updated, correct information on naturalization, with discussion kept on other, non-pinned pages.


#1222

Hi!

Please help me how can my mother petition me to permanently live in Taiwan? I’m a Filipino citizen and my mother is Taiwan citizen since she got married to Taiwanese.

Thank you in advance.


#1223

I have a question about the police clearance and travel after the issuance of the pre-naturalization certificate. For a (former) US citizen, what happens if you need to travel after you renounce, but before the Certificate of Loss of Nationality has been approved by the Dept. of State? (There is a new rule where you can keep your passport while they process the paperwork, which can take a couple to a few months) Would you need a new police certificate?

What about in the case that you travel to a different diplomatic outpost to resign and then use a stateless person’s travel document to return to Taiwan? First of all, can you reenter the country (Taiwan) on your ARC/APRC which was linked to your old passport? There must be a procedure for that because some countries like Myanmar require one to return to the home country to renounce. Secondly, would you need a police certificate issued after you return to Taiwan or simply one issued on the date of renunciation or later?

Obviously, renouncing in Taiwan and staying there all the way until you have an ROC passport in hand is the safest course, but I’m wondering what my options are.


#1224

[quote]To be clear, does this mean that a married person with an APRC (i.e., not a JFRV but nevertheless married) must do the police clearance? [/quote] AFAIK, there are 2 routes we can choose towards the path to Naturalization…The Single Route or the Married Route…If you’re Married but did not apply for the JFRV, then you will have to go the Single route & need to do the PCC. The reason why JFRV holders do not need a PCC is because they have already done it during the JFRV process.

[quote]Please help me how can my mother petition me to permanently live in Taiwan? I’m a Filipino citizen and my mother is Taiwan citizen since she got married to Taiwanese.[/quote] I don’t think there’s any way your mother can sponsor you to live permanently here in Taiwan (or the other way around) …Your only option is to work legally here for 5 years on a continuous ARC and then apply for an APRC/Taiwan ID or get married to a Taiwanese and apply for the Taiwan ID after 3 years.

[quote]I have a question about the police clearance and travel after the issuance of the pre-naturalization certificate. For a (former) US citizen, what happens if you need to travel after you renounce, but before the Certificate of Loss of Nationality has been approved by the Dept. of State? (There is a new rule where you can keep your passport while they process the paperwork, which can take a couple to a few months) Would you need a new police certificate? [/quote] Once the pre-naturalization certificate (officially referred to as the “Quasi Naturalization Certificate”) has been issued to you, then you will be warned by the HHR official NOT to travel outside Taiwan as doing so will require you to get a new PCC. Unless you have received the Certificate of Renunciation from your Country, you’re still its Citizen and hence your passport is still valid but then again, it is highly advisable NOT to make any unnecessary travel during this period as any travel AFTER receiving the Quasi Cert. will require you to make a new PCC.

[quote]What about in the case that you travel to a different diplomatic outpost to resign and then use a stateless person’s travel document to return to Taiwan? First of all, can you reenter the country (Taiwan) on your ARC/APRC which was linked to your old passport? There must be a procedure for that because some countries like Myanmar require one to return to the home country to renounce. Secondly, would you need a police certificate issued after you return to Taiwan or simply one issued on the date of renunciation or later?[/quote] Once you have renounced your Original Passport and become Stateless and have successfully received your Naturalization certificate, you will get your TARC (Taiwan Area Resident Certificate). With the TARC, you can apply for a Taiwanese passport and leave the country but then you will need to wait 2 years to get your Taiwan ID as opposed to the 1 year for those who haven’t left Taiwan. I’m not sure what procedure Myanmar citizens have to go through but I do know some countries do not allow you to renounce unless you have proof of Citizenship of another country…in this case, you are waived from providing a Renunciation Certificate.

Ohh…only about 3+ mths to go before I get my Taiwan ID …Woo Hoo!!! :slight_smile:


#1225

You’re probably right about the requirement, but police clearance is required during the APRC proess as well.

EDIT: Spring Onion applied via APRC, and had been divorced from an ROC citizen (and had not left the country for more than 3 months since the divorce). His posts begin on p. 118, and are a good place to start for APRC holders reading this huge thread. He reports providing the following documents:

[quote]1) Certificate of Residence in ROC (居留證明書) - 2 days to process
2) Proof of Chinese Language ability. I used my Shi-Da’s record of study - Paid NT$50 at the vending machine in Shi-Da and got it immediately.
3) APRC
4) Passport
5) NT$200 Postal Order to be made out in the Ministry of the Interior’s name (內政部)[/quote]

He adds that a Police Clearance Certificate is “definitely required,” but was apparently excused from having to provide a new one on the rather esoteric grounds that he had not left the ROC for more than three months since his divorce (but is that cumulative or per departure?).

BTW, where is this Shi-Da vending machine (item 2)? And…how many semesters there are enough? Otherwise I guess the alternative is to either join a Foreign Bride class, or take that multiple-choice exam that Northwest Surfer has so capably analyzed for us.


#1226

[quote]You’re probably right about the requirement, but police clearance is required during the APRC proess as well.[/quote] According to Icon on p.119, the new APRC rules state that anyone applying for an APRC now DO NOT have to provide a PCC if they have not left the country for more than 3 mths nor do they need to do a Medical Health Check.

[quote]He adds that a Police Clearance Certificate is “definitely required,” but was apparently excused from having to provide a new one on the rather esoteric grounds that he had not left the ROC for more than three months since his divorce (but is that cumulative or per departure?). [/quote] Yes, there is a clause in the Application form that states [color=#FF0000]“If the applicant has been previously married and divorced with a Taiwanese Citizen and never left the country AFTER the divorce, then he/she need not submit the Police Clearance from their Original Country[/color]”. I posted the Application Form (In Chinese) on p.119. This particular rule is mentioned in point #5. So even if you leave Taiwan for a day after your divorce, you will be required to submit a PCC.

[quote]BTW, where is this Shi-Da vending machine (item 2)? And…how many semesters there are enough? Otherwise I guess the alternative is to either join a Foreign Bride class, or take that multiple-choice exam that Northwest Surfer has so capably analyzed for us.[/quote] The vending machines are located in the main office building of Shida’s Mandarin Training Center (I think it’s the 6th or 7th floor). You need to show a minimum of 200 Hours of study to qualify or if you’re above the age of 65, then you need to only show 72 hours of study…and yes, the other alternative is to sit for the exam and get a minimum of 70% or if you’re above the age of 65, then 50% is sufficient.


#1227

Guys, that is basically because the marrie dfolk have already presented the police certificate when they applied for their visas, so it is redundant to present it again. My argument then is why we single folk with APRCs must present it again. Not fair! Goose, gander, and all that jazz.

Caveat emptor about Shida. I haven’t used the machine -and probably can’t as I was a student almost 20 years ago- but when I got my certificates some 10 years ago, the data in the Chinese and English versisons did not match and was even lacking in several places. But as long as you have the requisite hours just fine.


#1228

[quote=“Icon”]Guys, that is basically because the marrie dfolk have already presented the police certificate when they applied for their visas, so it is redundant to present it again. My argument then is why we single folk with APRCs must present it again. Not fair! Goose, gander, and all that jazz.

Caveat emptor about Shi-Da. I haven’t used the machine -and probably can’t as I was a student almost 20 years ago- but when I got my certificates some 10 years ago, the data in the Chinese and English versisons did not match and was even lacking in several places. But as long as you have the requisite hours just fine.[/quote]

Yeah…when I applied for my APRC 7 years ago, I was required to do my PCC and since I never left the country after that, according to logic, I should not need to do it again for my ID process…but hell no!!..Everyone with an APRC MUST provide one!! …This is probably due to the change in the APRC Rules where a PCC is no longer required…so the authorities decided since new APRC holders did not do a PCC, they must do one for their ID…thus penalizing all those “Old” APRC holders who had done it before.


#1229

Just had a chat with a friend who is about a week away from getting his ID…he went for his mandatory Health Check 2 weeks back and they tested his Blood and Stool samples…and he told me something interesting…the Health Check for the ID does not require a test for HIV now! (HIV Exempt Blood test) …From what I heard years back, an HIV test was compulsory and if you tested positive, you do not get your ID and you’re left Stateless. If this is the case, then it’s good news!!


#1230

Plus not all nationalities require stool samples, only certain people from certain countries… yours truly among them.


#1231

Plus not all nationalities require stool samples, only certain people from certain countries… yours truly among them.[/quote] I could care less if they want my poop or not …I can pee in a cup for them too if they demand it Lol :smiley:


#1232

Update : A little more than a month left to go… :slight_smile: Just went for my health check today (Form B, 乙表) at Taipei City hospital (Zhongxiao branch). Had to fill the form… paste 2 photographs, then do the Hansen’s disease check for leprosy, X-ray for tuberculosis, drew blood to check for syphillis (HIV test exempted), gave a stool sample (certain countries like the US, Canada, Europe, Australia, NZ, Japan etc are exempted)…the whole procedure took about 2 hours. …costs NT$1470. I will get back the results in a week’s time and then go to immigration next mth.


#1233

Finally!!! My 1-year sentence is up!!! Yippeeee!!! :laughing: They say time flies but the last year was the slowest possible ever lol …

So I took my final trip to the NIA (National Immigration Agency) on this very wet & stormy Monday afternoon to apply for my 定居證 (Certificate of continuous residence in the ROC)…[Btw, the NIA moved to a larger facility just next to the small building it was previously housed in]…documents/items needed were:

  1. Original TARC (It won’t be returned).
  2. Original Health Certificate from a Hospital recognized by the Dept. of Health (made within the past 3 mths).
  3. Original and a copy of the Household Registration booklet (made within the past 3 mths) OR your current rent contract.
  4. 1 passport/ID sized color photograph of yourself that was taken within the past 3 mths.
  5. Application form (available at the counter).
  6. A self addressed postage prepaid registered envelope (NT$25 stamp).
  7. Taiwan Spouse’s ID & his/her chop (Not necessary if you’re single, obviously)
  8. Processing fee of NT$600.

It will take approx. 2 weeks for my 定居證 to arrive in the mail…after THAT-----> Taiwan ID!!! :slight_smile:


#1234

My journey towards Citizenship is finally over!!! :laughing: With the “定居證” in hand, I went to the HHR at 9:30AM in the morning…took a number and waited for my number to be called…handed everything to the lady (定居證+台灣地區入出境許可證(Exit & Entry Permit)+Original Household Registration(戶口名簿)+Photograph)…she took about 20 minutes to verify everything (Address, Parent’s name, my name etc) …made me sign at a lot of places and then gave me a docket number to go pick up my ID Card from a different counter. I also applied for 2 copies of the “戶籍謄本” which will be needed later when I go update my License & Registration at the DMV.

Total Cost: Taiwan ID–> NT$50, New Household Registration Booklet(戶口名簿)–> NT$30, 2 Copies of 戶籍謄本@NT$15/Each–> NT$30 = NT$110.
After a wait of 10 mins, I finally received my shiny new Taiwan ID!!!.. :discodance:

So, in retrospect, it ain’t that hard to apply for Taiwan Citizenship once you have everything in order…if you’re willing to give up your Original Citizenship and decide to make Taiwan your home, I’d say go for it!

Start of Journey: Jan 14th 2015
End of Journey: June 27th 2016
Total Amount Spent: $100(居留證明書)+$50(Shida’s record of Study)+$200(Postal Order for Candidature Cert.)+$4880(Renunciation Fee)+$400(Authentication Fee)+$750(Notarization Fee)+$1000(Postal Order for Naturalization Cert.)+$1000(TARC Fee)+$1470(Health Check Fee)+$600(定居證)+$50(ID Fee)+$30(New Household Registration Booklet) = $10980 (Not inclusive of all other miscellaneous expenses)

I hope my posts will help other Forumosans in the near future who wishes to apply for Taiwan ID. Cheers and good luck!


#1235

Congratulations springonion! Some very detailed information should anyone be planning to go down the same road.


#1236

Sorry if I missed this in the FAQ. The search tool keeps saying that my search term is too short, weird.

I assume that once you obtain Taiwan Citizenship, you can easily apply for a Mainland Travel Permit for Taiwan Residents - taibaozheng 台胞证。

This permit is a card which effectively acts as a national ID within the PRC. With it you get working rights and right of abode. The PRC effectively recognises holders of this card as Chinese nationals which would include naturalized ROC nationals who hold the card.

Am I right?
Can anyone here who is a naturalized citizen of Taiwan chime in on their experiences in the mainland using the card?


#1237

Yup…all Taiwanese Citizens can apply for the 台胞證


#1238

Hey All,

Just joined the site and am looking through for some info on obtaining Taiwanese citizenship. Here’s my situation:

I was born in Taipei to an American father and Taiwanese mother (1986). Just spoke to my mom and she mentioned that at that time she couldn’t register me under her household because you could only register children under their father’s household. I lived in Taiwan for 3.5 years then left for 2 and now am back and want to stay indefinitely. I will have an ARC in a couple of weeks through employment.

So, my questions are as follows:

  1. Does my background give me a different path to citizenship or will I go through the same process as springonion?

  2. Does my background exempt me from giving up my US citizenship if I decide to get my Taiwanese citizenship?

  3. What’s the deal with the military service now? I was told by a Taiwanese lady the other day that it’s down to 4 months. Is this true?

Any info or links would be great. Thanks!


#1239

If you take a quick look at wikipedia it says that you should already be entitled to ROC citizen because your mother was at the time of your birth, and you were born after 1980. If I was you I would call to your mothers household registration office and ask them what to do.


#1240

Yeap it’s 4 months and I highly doubt you even need to go through it.

You should keep your ARC and retain your US citizenship. If you really like Taiwan, go for an APRC.