How was your ride today?


#21

Leaving at 15:00 I headed south and tried the Dahan River bike paths to Daxi and Longtan that Mucha Man is always on about. Very cool farm roads but the whole area seems very trashed by the typhoon/rainy season this year. Tons of underwater sections and I even had to ford a creek! :astonished: Then I climbed up and crossed Shimen Dam and hit the north bank of the resevoir. Perfect weather down there. Beautiful blue skies and golden late afternoon light around the lake. Then when I got back up toward Sanmin I could see where the clouds started up near Sanxia. Not bad for a little afternoon jaunt!

mapmyride.com/routes/view/136880575


#22

I’m sad to hear the trails are so trashed. Haven’t been on them since spring but I found the same when I rode out to Sanchong last week. Mud and dirt everywhere, and lots of damage to the parks. Felt like a different ride.

Anyway, sounds like you enjoyed it overall.


#23

[quote=“antarcticbeech”]Only got lost three times yesterday. :laughing: It’s great being able to ride around the mountains and buy water at fairly regular intervals though. Coming into Pinglin from Pinxi I took a ‘shortcut’ to Shiding that turned into a punishing longcut. :aiyo: Highlight of the ride was getting directions from a young monk with a beaming smile near Huafan University.

Losing a bit of fat doing this stuff in the heat.

Don’t know how accurate these elevation profiles are but they seem about right. [/quote]

Ha! yes, that’s steeeeep around there. I used to love that shit. i really miss the big climbs in Taiwan.

I spent today’s typhoon tail end and aftermath gluing on a new set of tires (last ride i copped yet another rear flat within 10 km of a new tire, and it’s sat in the shed like that for three months. I’m switching from the super fast and superlight Vittoria Corsa Evo to the tougher and slightly bigger Continental Sprinter gatorskins.)

Tomorrow will be sunny and I’m looking forward to the first ride in three months after my broken thumb. I’ll let you know how the tires go.


#24

Since I didn’t ride over the weekend, I decided to blow off the thesis today and take the 106 all the way to Ruifang. Such fantastic weather! Boy, I could sure get used to this.

I love the forest up by the turnoff to the Wufenshan weather station. I think the elevation there is only like 500 meters, but the trees make it seem higher up. There’s no better place to be on a fall day as the sun sets.


#25

Those Continental Sprinters are good tires. Significantly higher volume than the Vittoria Evo Corsa they replaced (takes 50% more strokes of the pump to get to 110 psi), so the ride is softer and more supple, and they seem to have a lot of grip. But the trade off is a slightly more remote road feel, and less feedback about the road surface. Better all round, especially if the road is not ultra smooth…

Oh, and the ride itself was glorious: 20 km in the sun and air. My fitness is well down, of course, but I’m glad to be back on the bike finally.


#26

[quote=“haokaiyang”]Since I didn’t ride over the weekend, I decided to blow off the thesis today and take the 106 all the way to Ruifang. Such fantastic weather! Boy, I could sure get used to this.

I love the forest up by the turnoff to the Wufenshan weather station. I think the elevation there is only like 500 meters, but the trees make it seem higher up. There’s no better place to be on a fall day as the sun sets.[/quote]

Yeah it’s nice out that way for sure. Never cycled it but been all over those roads on my motorcycle when I lived in Jingmei. I really like both the Keelung and Shuang River valleys. I’d like ride out that way soon - it would make a nice century from Sanxia. Or if I wanted to explore even more I could always ship my bike back from Ruifang (or maybe even from Fulong?).


#27

I sent mine back from Shuangxi one time a few years back. See?

After a day of exploring, I was too tired to ride back. I kind of miss the times when I could still get completely lost that close to Taipei.


#28

Want to get into the mountains tomorrow, weather allowing.


#29

I did the Ruifang to Fulong ride last year, via Shuangxi - it’s really nice in that area. Plus you’re following the railway line most of the way, so plenty of choices to stop and train it back.

Went out on a 40k here on Tuesday in awesome weather. A flat 36k out & back from Hualien to the Far Glory Hotel, and then the steep 2k up the Ocean Park hairpins (I’d forgotten how vicious they are) and down the other side.


#30

[quote=“Nuit”]I did the Ruifang to Fulong ride last year, via Shuangxi - it’s really nice in that area. Plus you’re following the railway line most of the way, so plenty of choices to stop and train it back.

Went out on a 40k here on Tuesday in awesome weather. A flat 36k out & back from Hualian to the Far Glory Hotel, and then the steep 2k up the Ocean Park hairpins (I’d forgotten how vicious they are) and down the other side.[/quote]

Jealous! I’ve been fiending for some East Coast action ever since I got my bike. I never seem to have the time to make it happen, and last minute train tickets are pretty much nonexistent anyway. I’m hoping to make it over there in Oct or Nov but if not at least there are lot’s of holiday weekends next year… :discodance:


#31

A last minute trip down here is a good thing. If I was going to make the trip from Taipei, I’d make darn show the 5 day forecast was reasonable. It can piss it down here for 7 days straight, and you don’t want to ride around in that. I’d rather take local trains for several hours (Taipei-Fulong, Fulong-Yilan, Yilan-Hualien), if it meant making sure of hitting a nice few days of weather.


#32

You are very unlikely to get tickets with seats, last minute or otherwise, on the express trains. Anyway, with a few exceptions at inconvenient times, you can’t take your bike with you, bagged or otherwise, on the express trains. They are serious about this. Don’t do it.

That leaves the local trains as Nuit suggested. It’s kind of a long time on a tight schedule, but I enjoy. Just bring a good book.

The best way though is to just ship your bike on the baggage train a day or so in advance and pick it up at the station in Hualien (or better yet, Ji’an). I’ve used this service for years and never had any problems with it.


#33

[quote=“Feiren”]You are very unlikely to get tickets with seats, last minute or otherwise, on the express trains. Anyway, with a few exceptions at inconvenient times, you can’t take your bike with you, bagged or otherwise, on the express trains. They are serious about this. Don’t do it.

That leaves the local trains as Nuit suggested. It’s kind of a long time on a tight schedule, but I enjoy. Just bring a good book.

The best way though is to just ship your bike on the baggage train a day or so in advance and pick it up at the station in Hualian (or better yet, Ji’an). I’ve used this service for years and never had any problems with it.[/quote]

Yeah, so far I’ve only shipped my bike on the baggage train. I’ve only done it three times and it’s already gotten a bit banged up from it. Bad luck perhaps.

Re: the local trains. Do you ever have any trouble taking your bike on those? They can refuse to let you take it onboard at their discretion right? Seems like Sunday afternoons could be too crowded…


#34

Same here. I’ve sent three different bikes on baggage trains and never noticed anything amiss with them afterward. What exactly did they do to your bike, PaddyB?


#35

[quote=“PaddyB”][quote=“Feiren”]You are very unlikely to get tickets with seats, last minute or otherwise, on the express trains. Anyway, with a few exceptions at inconvenient times, you can’t take your bike with you, bagged or otherwise, on the express trains. They are serious about this. Don’t do it.

That leaves the local trains as Nuit suggested. It’s kind of a long time on a tight schedule, but I enjoy. Just bring a good book.

The best way though is to just ship your bike on the baggage train a day or so in advance and pick it up at the station in Hualian (or better yet, Ji’an). I’ve used this service for years and never had any problems with it.[/quote]

Yeah, so far I’ve only shipped my bike on the baggage train. I’ve only done it three times and it’s already gotten a bit banged up from it. Bad luck perhaps.

Re: the local trains. Do you ever have any trouble taking your bike on those? They can refuse to let you take it onboard at their discretion right? Seems like Sunday afternoons could be too crowded…[/quote]

Here’s the deal on the local trains.

You can take your bike on any local train at any time but you need to apply at least one hour in advance, In practice, I have always been let on even when I just rolled up a few minutes before but they may read you the riot act in some places Wanhua is really strict for some reason. Small local stations are a breeze. They want to check if the quota of bikes is already on and if the train is too crowded.

You also need to bag your bike. What constitutes bagging has been a bit controversial. I have resorted to big plastic bags for some time but a month or so ago coming back from Miaoli, I was sternly told by a very pretty conductress that it had to be a ‘proper’ bike bag. A few weeks later I read in the paper that the TRA officials say that plastic bags are fine as long as the bike is actually in them.

I think this sums up the deal. The power that be want bikes on the trains. The local conductors who have to deal with crowded trains and annoyed commuters don’t like it, will try to adhere to the rules, and may impose additional ones.

Just ship you bike for longer rides. It’s a lot less hassle in the end.


#36

Same here. I’ve sent three different bikes on baggage trains and never noticed anything amiss with them afterward. What exactly did they do to your bike, PaddyB?[/quote]

First time, Ilan-Shulin - no problems.

Second time, Shulin-Douliu - my son’s seat was on the back and that got scratched up pretty good (understandable); the chain was off the chainring and wedged down between the crank and BB (not so understandable).

Third time, Ershui-Shulin - the rear derailleur cable on my seatstay was frayed almost in half and there was a small chip of paint missing on the very top of my headtube.

Maybe I have bad luck or maybe they hate bikes at those stations?

[quote=“Feiren”]
Here’s the deal on the local trains.

You can take your bike on any local train at any time but you need to apply at least one hour in advance, In practice, I have always been let on even when I just rolled up a few minutes before but they may read you the riot act in some places Wanhua is really strict for some reason. Small local stations are a breeze. They want to check if the quota of bikes is already on and if the train is too crowded.

You also need to bag your bike. What constitutes bagging has been a bit controversial. I have resorted to big plastic bags for some time but a month or so ago coming back from Miaoli, I was sternly told by a very pretty conductress that it had to be a ‘proper’ bike bag. A few weeks later I read in the paper that the TRA officials say that plastic bags are fine as long as the bike is actually in them.

I think this sums up the deal. The power that be want bikes on the trains. The local conductors who have to deal with crowded trains and annoyed commuters don’t like it, will try to adhere to the rules, and may impose additional ones.

Just ship you bike for longer rides. It’s a lot less hassle in the end.[/quote]

Thanks for the info. I think it does indeed sound much easier just to ship it, especially since I don’t ride much during the week anyway. I’ll stick with that.


#37

I’ve shipped my bike from train stations in almost every county in Taiwan with absolutely no probs, and no damage whatsoever. It is a great system. I won’t ship anymore 'cause my new bikes would be expensive to replace. Recently, I’ve traveled with my bike on the same “fast” train from the east coast, and also on the local trains wher you can roll it on. Check the train sched for which fast trains allow bagged bikes in the luggage car.

As for my ride today, it was such a gorgeous morning, I turned my usual weekday 25 into a 40 k. Didn’t want to head back. The weather this weekend looks great too.

Paddy B, if you’re an early rider, I might run into you some time on the Luo Ma road. :thumbsup:


#38

[quote=“Wookiee”]I’ve shipped my bike from train stations in almost every county in Taiwan with absolutely no probs, and no damage whatsoever. It is a great system. I won’t ship anymore 'cause my new bikes would be expensive to replace. Recently, I’ve traveled with my bike on the same “fast” train from the east coast, and also on the local trains wher you can roll it on. Check the train sched for which fast trains allow bagged bikes in the luggage car.

As for my ride today, it was such a gorgeous morning, I turned my usual weekday 25 into a 40 k. Didn’t want to head back. The weather this weekend looks great too.

Paddy B, if you’re an early rider, I might run into you some time on the Luo Ma road. :thumbsup:[/quote]

Yes, I’m an early rider but never quite as early as I’d like. If I go for a morning ride I’m usually in the mountains by 8 at the latest though. I’ll probably be rocking the child seat on the Longtan paths tomorrow morning and then I’ll probably do Luoma Road via Sanmin & Fuxing Sunday morning, perhaps even hitting some county roads down to Neiwan if the weathers nice and I’m feeling particularly virile.

Send me a PM if you want to join, although I might be a little bit slow for you if you’re a serious roadie.


#39

Whoops that’s not quite right!

If you bag your bike you do NOT need to apply in advance to take your bike on. You are also not charged extra.

There are also designated local trains that you can just roll onto. These you should apply to ride on at least one hour advance and you will be charged an extra half fare for your bike.

Please remember. You can’t do anything with your bike at Taipei Main Station. No shipping,no bagging, no rolling on or off. Nothing. Bikes are prohibited from the platforms and they are serious about this.

[quote=“Feiren”][quote=“PaddyB”][quote=“Feiren”]You are very unlikely to get tickets with seats, last minute or otherwise, on the express trains. Anyway, with a few exceptions at inconvenient times, you can’t take your bike with you, bagged or otherwise, on the express trains. They are serious about this. Don’t do it.

That leaves the local trains as Nuit suggested. It’s kind of a long time on a tight schedule, but I enjoy. Just bring a good book.

The best way though is to just ship your bike on the baggage train a day or so in advance and pick it up at the station in Hualian (or better yet, Ji’an). I’ve used this service for years and never had any problems with it.[/quote]

Yeah, so far I’ve only shipped my bike on the baggage train. I’ve only done it three times and it’s already gotten a bit banged up from it. Bad luck perhaps.

Re: the local trains. Do you ever have any trouble taking your bike on those? They can refuse to let you take it onboard at their discretion right? Seems like Sunday afternoons could be too crowded…[/quote]

Here’s the deal on the local trains.

You can take your bike on any local train at any time but you need to apply at least one hour in advance, In practice, I have always been let on even when I just rolled up a few minutes before but they may read you the riot act in some places Wanhua is really strict for some reason. Small local stations are a breeze. They want to check if the quota of bikes is already on and if the train is too crowded.

You also need to bag your bike. What constitutes bagging has been a bit controversial. I have resorted to big plastic bags for some time but a month or so ago coming back from Miaoli, I was sternly told by a very pretty conductress that it had to be a ‘proper’ bike bag. A few weeks later I read in the paper that the TRA officials say that plastic bags are fine as long as the bike is actually in them.

I think this sums up the deal. The power that be want bikes on the trains. The local conductors who have to deal with crowded trains and annoyed commuters don’t like it, will try to adhere to the rules, and may impose additional ones.

Just ship you bike for longer rides. It’s a lot less hassle in the end.[/quote]


#40

[quote=“PaddyB”]

First time, Ilan-Shulin - no problems.

[/quote=“PaddyB”]

OK.

[quote]
Second time, Shulin-Douliu - my son’s seat was on the back and that got scratched up pretty good (understandable); the chain was off the chainring and wedged down between the crank and BB (not so understandable). [/quote]

Normally they make you take all accessories off the bike. Sensible. I have had a back light stolen.

Yes, I have picked up my bike with the chain off a number of times. I’m not sure why. But so what? Just put the chain back on. It’s never caused any problems for riding.

Hmmm. OK the damage to the rear derailleur cable sounds more serious. You should have pointed that out to them in a non-confrontational way. The guys who work are usually very friendly and helpful and want to give good service.

A chip on your headtube? Dud, I know you took six months to buy a bike so you are a careful consumer, but seriously! The loss is miniscule compared the service of getting you out to the mountains to ride! Besides, chips give you street cred.

I’ve used this service hundreds of times and many friends have too. I’ve never heard of a bike getting stolen, much less one of mine. I also see very expensive bikes being shipped this way. Sure there’s a little risk. But if you don’t own a car, it’s probably worth it. BTW, security is tighter at the big stations.