Life on the MRT


#1921

The numbering scheme being abandoned is NOT the individual numbering of stations (which will remain in place) but the idiotic numbering of the lines: Line 1, Line 2, Line 3, etc. I for one welcome this change as nobody I have met refers to the lines by the line number–ever. Good riddance!

Guy


#1922

The only person I knew who used the numbers was my sister, who visited Taipei last December. Probably because she was totally new to the system and saw the numbers on the signs.


#1923

I have to write an article about this and I do not get it… sigh…


#1924

There is a strange gap on the numeration of the orange line. It just jumps from ‘21’ to ‘50’… What happened with the numbers in between?


#1925

They are for the future stations on the circular line.

The new numbering system is line the Kaohsiung and Taoyuan one: it uses number for the stations that are there in process of being built.


#1926

They are for the future stations on the circular line.

The new numbering system is line the Kaohsiung and Taoyuan one: it uses number for the stations that are there in process of being built.[/quote]

Got it! :bow:


#1927

I’m so used to traveling on the MRT in Taipei I find myself not even bothering with the new system as I know my way around.

It was fun in Kaohsiung with the numbered system.


#1928

Today in the News:

外籍旅客捷運站吵鬧 交警方處理
中央社中央社 – 2016年5月5日 下午12:07
(中央社記者黃麗芸台北5日電)台北捷運公司今天表示,一名外籍旅客上午7時47分在捷運信義安和站自言自語、手舞足蹈,隨即由保全人員陪同乘車至忠孝復興站下車,經巡邏員警勸導無效,於8時52分帶回轄區,未影響營運。

“Talking to himself, hands and feet dancing” What was going on? :astonished:


#1929

Funny incident of Taiwanese not wanting to sit next to a foreigner. This man moved to sit next to me, but after seeing a non Asian face, he frantically moved through half the car looking for a seat before he decided that having a seat was worth having to sit next to a non Taiwanese and came back and took the empty seat.


#1930

Interesting. I had somewhat of an opposite experience. I was sitting in a 3/4 empty car with lots of double seats free, when a guy got onto the train at the opposite end of the car – spotted me, and walked the entire length of the car, passing up all the empty seats, looking at me all the way, and plonked down right next to me. I didn’t like the vibes and got up and changed seats. Happily, he didn’t follow me.


#1931

[quote=“Ricarte”]The new target date was announced:

http://focustaiwan.tw/news/asoc/201603200017.aspx
[/quote]


Under the terms of the contract, the travel time between Taipei and Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport should fall within 35 minutes, and the interval between each train should be three minutes, but current tests show the travel time is about 37 minutes, while the intervals are around three minutes and 15 seconds.

It’s only 2 minutes difference, (and 15 seconds in second case). Why bother?


#1932

[quote=“newTaiwanese”][quote=“Ricarte”]The new target date was announced:

http://focustaiwan.tw/news/asoc/201603200017.aspx
[/quote]


Under the terms of the contract, the travel time between Taipei and Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport should fall within 35 minutes, and the interval between each train should be three minutes, but current tests show the travel time is about 37 minutes, while the intervals are around three minutes and 15 seconds.

It’s only 2 minutes difference, (and 15 seconds in second case). Why bother?[/quote]

I’m sure face is involved somehow.

FTA:
“The line, which has been under construction since 2006 and will serve 22 stations, was originally scheduled to open in 2010”

So currently 10 years to build and 6 years behind schedule.


#1933

June, eh? This year??? I would like to use it before I die of old age.


#1934

I can see it now, they announce May 19, that on May 21. Tsai Ing Wen will cut the ribbon for the grand opening.


#1935

Any ideas on how much a ride from Taipei to the airport will cost on this line? I’m looking forward to it and hope it’s completed soon. But I’ve been using one of those black car airport service and for $700, it ain’t a bad option. Even though there is a stop for Songshan airport, i still find myself taking a cab 99% of the time.


#1936

I don’t like going by cab because you never know when you are going to get stuck in traffic – which has happened to me on more than one occasion. The best combination of speed and convenience for me is going by HSR.

MRT to Taipei Main Station: 20 NT; HSR to Taoyuan: 175 NT; Bus to airport: 15 NT

I’m waiting to see what the travel is like on the MRT line – the thought of all those stops doesn’t exactly thrill me. I like smooth and speedy. If the MT doesn’t provide enough of a speed/convenience factor, I might still stick with the HSR.


#1937

[quote=“RJF”]I don’t like going by cab because you never know when you are going to get stuck in traffic – which has happened to me on more than one occasion. The best combination of speed and convenience for me is going by HSR.

MRT to Taipei Main Station: 20 NT; HSR to Taoyuan: 175 NT; Bus to airport: 15 NT

I’m waiting to see what the travel is like on the MRT line – the thought of all those stops doesn’t exactly thrill me. I like smooth and speedy. If the MT doesn’t provide enough of a speed/convenience factor, I might still stick with the HSR.[/quote]

Yeah, I’m religious for the MRT/HSR combo these days, actually quite quick and painless. In other good news Kuo-kuang is now running all-nite buses with everyone else stepping aside. With so many flights departing and arriving at silly O’clock its good to know you’ve always got a bus option.


#1938

How long is the hsr bus option? Not that i would be able to use it as i always seem to land at 2am…

I’ve not really used the HSR yet. The idea that you still need to commute after arriving kind of defeats the purpose for me…


#1939

Right – for returning, when I’m not so anxious about the time, I usually take the Kuo-kuang to get home. If the MRT is still running, I get off at the second stop in Taipei and walk the couple of blocks to the Yuan Shan station. Otherwise, if it’s late, I get off at the first stop (School for the Hearing Impaired – which in less politically correct times used to be called School for the Deaf), and take a taxi home.


#1940

The bus runs roughly every 10 mins during busy times of the day – usually every 15 mins otherwise, and the trip takes 15-20 minutes or so, depending on whether or not it makes a hotel stop on the way.