Mexican Food in Taipei


#61

You can order masa harina off of taobao.


#62

Seriously, I don’t know when I acquired this halo of omniscience, but it’s silly. :wink: My position is the same as yours. AFAIK you need masa harina for making corn tortillas. The texture etc. will probably not be right otherwise, but I’ve never experimented.

I’m not sure what that refers to, but perhaps they’re like sopes? Living in Mexico, I never saw or heard of a masa “boat” (not that my experience was somehow all-encompassing). Is this fancy new cuisine?

Tamal, actually. I made the same error growing up, and still recall being corrected by my father, who is from Celaya, Gto.

My assumption has always been that you need proper maiz nixtamalizado to make them, but it couldn’t hurt to do the experiment. You’d need experience to judge the result, obviously! I doubt it would work.


#63

Seriously, I don’t know when I acquired this halo of omniscience, but it’s silly. :wink: [/quote]
Oh, I never said omniscience. I just said you’d know more than I do about preparing Mexican food. That still leaves a lot of room for ignorance!

I’m not sure what that refers to, but perhaps they’re like sopes?[/quote]
Yup, sopes. I guess “boats” is one of the current midway/descriptive terms restaurants are using for people who may not know what a sope is (like me). Eddy’s Cantina for example has “sopes” on the menu, but then describes them as “Handmade corn masa boats”. I believe Mayan Grill did the same thing. From what I recall of the Mayan Grill one, cornmeal could probably work OK as a substitute. Serve it to my Taiwanese friends or someone who wouldn’t know any better? Sure. Serve it to someone who knows Mexican cuisine? Probably not.

Tamal, actually.[/quote]

Ah, well that’s a whole other linguistic debate. At what point does the incorrect English back-formation become standard? (Thanks, though. I didn’t know that.)

If I were to make tamales (?), they’d be in an ever-larger category of dishes I’ve only cooked at home, and never tried in a restaurant, authentic or otherwise, so I’d have no way to say if it “works” in an authentic sense. For example, I love the assorted polenta dishes I’ve added to my repertoire. One of these days I really should try polenta at a genuinely Italian-ish restaurant to see if I’m anywhere close to “standard”, not that it really matters for whether or not I enjoy the dish.

I recently noticed that Diana Kennedy’s Essential Cuisines of Mexico now has a Kindle edition, although from what I’ve seen of her stuff I’m far more likely to read that than I am to cook with it. Perhaps more practical for me are the upcoming Rick Bayless’s [url=http://www.amazon.com/More-Mexican-Everyday-Seasonal-Celebratory-ebook/dp/B00NUB4F5W/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1426388929&sr=1-1&keywords=more+mexican+everyday]More Mexican Everyday[/url] (LOVE the first one), and Cooks Illustrated’s as always modestly named Best Mexican Recipes.


#64

If we are going into detail, the stuff you use for tortillas is different technically speaking from the one you use for arepas, pupusas, and yes, cornbread and polenta. Basic corn “meal” turned into many different things. Not as flexible flavor-wise as wheat but then a gordita is not a taco. Which is why anyways tacos in Central America are not the same as tacos in Mexico.

As to using dried masa to make tamales, also technically speaking, is close to heresy as per my relatives and the results, IMHO, can never be as good as with fresh masa. But then they think the same of tortillas made from the dried stuff. Yes, I know that as Latinos abroad we make do with dried because meipanfa, but… Hence, the mill idea.


#65

That’s a common problem for me too, although, fortunately, I grew up eating tamales occasionally, and have been able to try tamales and sopes in Mexico, traditional mole, and so on.

[quote="Icon, in another thread, "]Dunno if it is lost in translation, but we use cal -some form of chalk related stuff- for tortillas./quote]

Searching online turns up that it is calcium oxide (CaO, 氧化鈣), aka quicklime or burnt lime (made by putting limestone in a very hot kiln), which when you add it to water becomes calcium hydroxide (slaked lime) aka pickling lime, aka lime paste, which has nothing to do with citrus limes (but I can imagine some poor schleb has misunderstood and has written the latter into instructions online somewhere). I imagine you’ll find the calcium oxide itself marketed under ‘pickling lime’.

According to this site, it forms a cloudy slurry in water, as it is minimally soluble in water. You can search for pickling lime online and see if anyone ships internationally. However, acc. to Wiki, it is widely used in the food industry, and so food-grade slaked lime is likely available here somewhere, especially since it’s used to make ‘century eggs’ (皮蛋 pídàn) acc. to Wiki. It might be used in some Thai food to, as this pic implies. It’s used to prepare betel nuts here; should be easy to get.


#66

NEWS FLASH

There is a Mexican guy named Luca selling home made tortillas at NTU this week. If nearby, grab some!


#67

Oh, and in case you do get some tortillas, think about getting/making one of these, to heat up the tortillas, especially using gas stoves:


#68

+1 for juanitas. tried it the other day, it definitely hit the spot.

although i don’t like the counter style restaurants with hardly any seats the food was awesome. i didn’t have much choice as all the actual restaurant style mexican restaurants had very shitty reviews. i will try eddies cantina next time.


#69

[quote=“RickRooney”]+1 for juanitas. tried it the other day, it definitely hit the spot.

although I don’t like the counter style restaurants with hardly any seats the food was awesome. i didn’t have much choice as all the actual restaurant style Mexican restaurants had very shitty reviews. i will try eddies cantina next time.[/quote]

Juanitas is PERMANENTLY CLOSED behind Sogo at No. 51, Lane 160, Section 1, Dunhua S Rd . Don’t know if this has already been mentioned.


#70

Wow that sucks


#71

[quote=“tango42”][quote=“RickRooney”]+1 for juanitas. tried it the other day, it definitely hit the spot.

although I don’t like the counter style restaurants with hardly any seats the food was awesome. i didn’t have much choice as all the actual restaurant style Mexican restaurants had very shitty reviews. i will try eddies cantina next time.[/quote]

Juanitas is PERMANENTLY CLOSED behind Sogo at No. 51, Lane 160, Section 1, Dunhua S Rd . Don’t know if this has already been mentioned.[/quote]

:astonished:

NOOOOOOOOOO!!!


#72

BTW, soon to come: Pan de Muerto available. Make your pedidos / orders here.


#73

I had a pretty good chicken burrito the other day at Pre Game in Xin Yi. Just to set expectations, that place is American-style bar food so not sure if their burrito ranks high as far as authenticity goes…but it was tasty.


#74

I have a 1lb bag of masa harina sitting in my freezer, specially FedEx’d to me last week :smiley:
Gonna attempt corn tortillas sometime this week.


#75

[quote=“Icon”][quote=“tango42”][quote=“RickRooney”]+1 for juanitas. tried it the other day, it definitely hit the spot.

although I don’t like the counter style restaurants with hardly any seats the food was awesome. i didn’t have much choice as all the actual restaurant style Mexican restaurants had very shitty reviews. i will try eddies cantina next time.[/quote]

Juanitas is PERMANENTLY CLOSED behind Sogo at No. 51, Lane 160, Section 1, Dunhua S Rd . Don’t know if this has already been mentioned.[/quote]

:astonished:

NOOOOOOOOOO!!![/quote]

Yea, they’ve already started remodeling into some Chinese restaurant. On the plus side, RexMex in Shida is mostly amazing food.


#76

There is a Taco Festival this weekend? How can there be this many places that serve tacos that I have never heard of?!

Taipei Times
Fri, Apr 08, 2016 - Page 12
The anywhere, anytime kind of food

Taiwan gears up for its first-ever Festival del Taco en Taipei tomorrow and Sunday at Taipei Artist Village

By Marcus Aurelius / Contributing reporter

Uncle Taco Touch will be selling a variety of tacos at the Festival del Taco in Taipei tomorrow.

Taiwan is well known for it’s many cheap culinary delights. Stinky tofu, oyster omelets, pig’s blood cake and three cups chicken (三杯雞) are all tasty dishes found easily in every city and are a must try for tourists.
In Latin countries, tacos are usually the best cheap foods. Taiwan doesn’t really do tacos, unless guabao (割包), soy sauce braised pork topped with peanut powder and served in a steamed bun, is included. This weekend, the first-ever Festival del Taco en Taipei at the Taiwan Artist Village (台北國際藝術村) will be introducing Taiwan to a variety of tacos
Nine stalls will be selling tacos, including Em’s Taco, Mecato, Uncle Kunkel, Nala’s Mexican Food and Las Adelitas.

TACO MADNESS
Todde Williams is a culinary crackerjack who considers himself an expert on tacos. He plans his birthdays in Taco Bells and is always on the lookout for Mexican food when he travels around the world as a writer. Williams will also be at the festival selling his Uncle Taco Touch tacos.
Having relocated to Taipei from South Korea two years ago, Williams says that Taiwanese pay closer attention to replicating the original than Korean’s do.
“Taipei has actually taken the time to look up recipes, and people in town travel a lot more than Koreans do, and get more out of other cultures in general. I’d say that here it’s genuinely about flavor, even if there’s a slight miss,” he said.
“Sometimes everything will be spot on, and then someone throws cabbage on the taco and makes it a mess. I’ve had a perfect taco, served cold, and a nice, hot, juicy taco served with mayonnaise instead of sour cream.”
While Williams’ favorite taco joint in Taiwan is Anita’s Cantina in Taitung County’s Dulan Village (都蘭), he said he is proud of his pork adobada, which he stews for 12 hours.

Festival Notes
What: Festival del Taco en Taipei (台北墨西哥夾餅節
When: Saturday and Sunday from 12pm to 6pm
Where: Taipei Artist Village (台北國際藝術村), 7 Beiping E Rd, Taipei City (台北市北平東路7號)
Admission: Free
On the Net: On Facebook, search for Festival del Taco en Taipei

“It’s [the] Mexican guabao,” he said.


#77

[quote=“tango42”]There is a Taco Festival this weekend? …
Festival Notes
What: Festival del Taco en Taipei (台北墨西哥夾餅節
When: Saturday and Sunday from 12pm to 6pm
Where: Taipei Artist Village (台北國際藝術村), 7 Beiping E Rd, Taipei City (台北市北平東路7號)
Admission: Free[/quote]
Thanks for posting about this. My goodness, I may actually go downtown on a weekend. I try very hard to avoid that.

I can see why they’re making the comparison, but man, way to make tacos sound unappetizing!


#78

sounds good…

a few days ago i saw masa stocked in super city. is this normal? or a random appearance… did not expect to find such a specialist item in taiwan.


#79

[quote=“RickRooney”]sounds good…

a few days ago I saw masa stocked in super city. is this normal? or a random appearance… did not expect to find such a specialist item in Taiwan.[/quote]

It is rare as an unicorn. :astonished:

Which City Super you say?

Was it wet masa or that yellow thing from the States?

in which case, close but no cigar.


#80

[quote=“Icon”][quote=“RickRooney”]sounds good…

a few days ago I saw masa stocked in super city. is this normal? or a random appearance… did not expect to find such a specialist item in Taiwan.[/quote]

It is rare as an unicorn. :astonished:

Which City Super you say?

Was it wet masa or that yellow thing from the States?

in which case, close but no cigar.[/quote]

What is “wet masa”? Do tell…
And what city super has that Bob’s Red Mill Masa Harina? I had to hand carry a bag last time and I am halfway through it already.