Model Agencies


#1

Greatings.

Does anyone know what are the best model agencies in Taipei?
Thank’s.


#2

I know of only one, the guy who runs it is really nice though!

www.vnlmodels.com.


#3

Here’s a list of most of them with contact details. There’s 15 in it but I think there are a couple more that I missed.

craigfergusonimages.com/2011 … nd-models/

Just make sure that if you contact any, they are able to provide you a work permit for any jobs you do.


#4

There is a big difference between professional models and talents agencies. If you are professional model you want to contact Dolls Models or Pace Models, however if you are looking for some extra incomes, talent agencies as VNL or Fashion Garden Models are good options. I leave you the links
dolls-model.com
pacemodels.com.tw
facebook.com/pages/VNL/111072348910854
facebook.com/profile.php?id=100003307498395


#5

[quote=“Aurora01”]There is a big difference between professional models and talents agencies. If you are professional model you want to contact Dolls Models or Pace Models, however if you are looking for some extra incomes, talent agencies as VNL or Taiwan Models Intc are good options. I leave you the links
dolls-model.com
pacemodels.com.tw
facebook.com/pages/VNL/111072348910854
facebook.com/profile.php?id=507103113[/quote]

With all due respect to this being your first post and all, the idea that V&L only represents extras is patently untrue. There is a talent division that keeps me hopping. I do not do extra work and anyone that only wishes to be considered as talent is free to do the same.

I’ve yet to work with any talent from pace, but have had several of their extras on set. The fact of the matter is, when casting directors are looking for western faces, be it talent, extra or model, they come to V&L first. V&L is also opening up a stunt person division.

I will also take this opportunity to warn people again that not all agencies will provide a work permit for each and every gig. I was on a set this week with 3 western extras supplied by a fly by night operator that are in grave danger of being sent packing. They risk everything for 5K and are often ignorant of the fact that they need proper documentation. I have been investigated several times and can unequivocally state that the labor board is actively deporting folks who show up on sets without the proper paperwork.

V&L will never send you to a set without a work permit.

Be careful out there folks.


#6

If you are looking for full-time modeling and professional jobs I think it is better to go to a big agency first, they can offer you an exclusive contract with minimum monthly incomes or minimum working hours. I doubt talents agencies can handle that, but they can offer you many job opportunities for an average 40% commission fee; make sure what is the gross income so you can calculate it. Contact more than one agency is also good idea since some brands or production houses prefer to work with some agencies, and don’t like to work with certain others.


#7

Hi Toe Save
What is the situation for students? My son ( 16 yrs )is very keen to give this a try. We will be in TP in July. Is there much part time work for them - evenings/weekends or is it more for full time people? :sunglasses:

Thanks
A


#8

There are agencies specialized in underage, they understand kids and teens much more than regular agencies. First you could contact Joy, most foreigner parents in Taipei know him for his catalogs; keep asking and you will find some others to compare opportunities, attitude and payments. Don’t rush to sign any exclusive contract that will limit your son’s future job opportunities.


#9

[quote=“Arriving Soon”]Hi Toe Save
What is the situation for students? My son ( 16 yrs )is very keen to give this a try. We will be in TP in July. Is there much part time work for them - evenings/weekends or is it more for full time people? :sunglasses:

Thanks
A[/quote]

As the late, great George Bernard Shaw once said, “You never can tell.” July is busier for film, while Sept-Nov and March-May is the print “season”. The recipe for success in this business is equal parts talent, look and availability. I’d be happy to meet with you and your son and discuss his potential. If you want to move forward, we can do a free portfolio shoot, take his measurements and start sending his images out to casting agents. The more available he is, the more casting opportunities he’ll get. Extrapolate from there.

V&L has a youth division and are very cognizant of the special attention needed. At 16 years of age though, your son would be sent out for adult roles as well. Kids rarely work more than 4 hours per day. Adults can work 15 hours in a day. But in those cases, the gig is so well remunerated that taking a day off school is a no-brainer.

If your son would like to ask me anything else, feel free to drop me a PM or join my facebook group.

Cheers.

Toe


#10

Thanks Toe Save
We will contact you once we are in Taipei. :sunglasses:

See you then
A


#11

Welcome to Taiwan Antoin,

One more advice before you arrived:

Generally speaking, people in Taiwan can work 8 regular hours a day, plus 4 (maximum) extra hours that must be paid with a different rate. It means working more than 12 hours a day is illegal. If the government finds it out, both the employee and the employer have to pay a penalty fee. For minors the regulation is a bit different, that is one of the reasons for their schedules.

Don’t let any company take advantage of you just because of your foreigner status.

Hope your son gets as many cases as possible (within the law) and that you and your family enjoy Taiwan’s friendly environment


#12

This is Andy. I have done some modeling and acting in the US. After I came back Taiwan, I have tried to look for good modeling and acting agencies. Be honest with you, only few of them are ok. The pay is very low. I was lucky to be cast a role of Taiwan Health Department officer/inspector for a movie called “Dog Legend” The rest of casting roles sucks.

Do not trust any one of them that they ask you pay the money for photos or any website maintenance fees ! I am working with two ok agent now. If you like, please PM me. Yet, I do not know if they need western people !


#13

[quote=“WelcomeAndy”]This is Andy. I have done some modeling and acting in the US. After I came back Taiwan, I have tried to look for good modeling and acting agencies. Be honest with you, only few of them are ok. The pay is very low. I was lucky to be cast a role of Taiwan Health Department officer/inspector for a movie called “Dog Legend” The rest of casting roles sucks.

Do not trust any one of them that they ask you pay the money for photos or any website maintenance fees ! I am working with two ok agent now. If you like, please PM me. Yet, I do not know if they need western people ![/quote]

Welcome WelcomeAndy. Congratulations on landing a role in a movie. There aren’t that many to go around, so good on you for getting one. Sorry to hear about the low wages though. Also, thank you for your excellent advice about agencies that charge for a photo shoot. In my experience that is a huge red flag and such operators should be avoided. I believe that has been discussed before however. Still, thanks…

Aurora, to follow up on your post, kids only work 4 hours per day on a set, however adults can work as long as they are willing to. Every contract is different and completely up to the talent if they want to accept its parameters. I’ve had 20 minute gigs and 17 hour gigs. If you agree to the terms set out by the contract, then you do the work with no complaints. Remember, there is always someone else willing to step up and do it, so pick your battles.

Today I am shooting a music video in a silly costume for low pay. It’s completely up to me to do it. I am doing it because I think it will be fun while at the same time, I’ll never post it on my facebook page. :blush:

What a business. :discodance:

Toe Sells Out


#14

Modeling and acting jobs are not bad paid, but sometimes all the money ends in agency’s pockets; you should take a look of the original contract between the agency and the client and make sure the agency is not tricking you.

Many companies take advantage of the fact that most foreigners are not aware of Taiwan industry and labor regulations. Sometimes they ask you to sign unfair contracts with abusive clauses such as exclusivity or non-competence (do not work in the same industry after your contract expire), and then try to stop you getting better jobs by using the penalty clause, luckily Council of Labor Affairs (CLA) understands that employees are the weak part of the contract and has established laws to protect your rights (see the link).
leeandli.com/web/bulletin/ar … sp?id=1527 (Sorry, no English version)

It is not true that you cannot complain about the terms on the contract. When the contract goes against the law the company cannot enforce it.
Overtime is a good example: Even if the contract says that you must work 17 hours a day, Labor Standards Act Chapter IV determined that it is illegal. The company will get fined and also the employee if he/she doesn’t report it (see the link).
laws.cla.gov.tw/Eng/FLAW/FLAWDAT … d=FL014930


#15

[quote=“Toe Save”]…not signing a contract with an agent, as Aurora suggests later in this thread, is a ridiculous idea…
…That they are here implying that 40% commission is high is somewhat ironic…[/quote]
Toe,

Don’t misunderstand me.

When you get a job of course! You must sign a contract, but you can have more than one agent and don’t need to agree with all what the agencies ask.

Example:
If a TV commercial will be done within a week, you don’t need to sign 1 years exclusive contract;
you sign a contract for that job and keep the opportunity to work with other agencies.

An exclusivity clause forbids you to work with other firms, thus when other agencies offer you higher payment or better jobs, the first agency will take advantage of the exclusive agreement. (RED FLAG) Good deal for them but what is the benefit for you?

When a company asks me to sign an exclusive contract, I request (at least) guaranty incomes.
Notice that it is not only for overseas models.

Regarding the commission, I imply 40% is the average but I know some companies charge higher rates.
Some agencies don’t even work by commission, instead they pay low wage to the actors/models and take most part of the incomes.

I am trying to make things more transparent so new actors don’t be tricked so easily and actors with some experience (like you) can improve their situation.


#16

Attention!

Foreigners in Taiwan can obtain work permit for acting/modeling MAXIMUM for 90 days, with the possibility to extend it for another 90 days period. Taiwan Council of Labor Affairs (CLA) can’t issue work-permits out of this time-limit for artistic jobs; therefore contracts that exceed this time-limit may lead you to a situation where you have a labor contract with a company that is not allowed to hire you. Thus, with a copy of the contract in CLA and without work permit, you may be treated as illegal worker.

A dear friend already got troubles due to this topic; hope you won’t be the next. Avoid complications and keep your labor contract within Taiwan law. Don’t trust agencies promising you ARC or more than 90 days work permit for artistic jobs, according with CLA it is not possible.

For foreigner actors/models, CLA suggests to sign 90-days contracts each time.


#17

Even more horror stories arising out of this business. For legal reasons I am not going to name any agencies, but damn…

Be real careful out there folks. I’ve been contacted by more than a few people whom’ve been outright lied to by unscrupulous operators out there. A lot of them are extremely worried about how well V&L treats its clients and are going to extraordinary measures to badmouth these fine folks. Some that have worked for V&L have stolen data bases and moved on to start their own companies and some have manufactured copies of our contracts and pass them off as their own. In my very professional opinion, there is no choice other than V&L out there. All others are to be avoided.


#18

Back in the days, my son performed for Disney and Why and a1/2.
The only thing I remember is being 5 hours somewhere stuck in a cow stall ( transformed in a studio) and being paid 2000 NTd ( not knowing then what rules were) We gladly bought him some nice outfits.
However, the Poor kid did not had any toys to amuse himself with while waiting for another shoot and green tea as sole drink availbale was not his favorite.
After that we declined all other calls as I know he did not envisioned a role as a model ( yet) :slight_smile:


#19

Dear Aurora01,

I am glad that you are out here trying to help people understand the complexities of working legally as a Model or talent in Taiwan.

The simple thing is to get the papers from whoever has applied for the permit and understand what they say.

For the acting/modeling work permit you may not be able to extend it over 90 days but all you have to do is to fly out of Taiwan and have another 90 day work permit set up. If you have not gotten a job or very few jobs over the last 90 days you might be denied another 90 permit. There is a way to extend it but it is only for celebrities so most people could not get it. Something very important to know is that you need to submit your taxes. If people don’t submit taxes before you leave Taiwan you will not be able to come back.

Most major Taiwan agencies have at least a few models that have stayed with them long term using this process.

The main thing to be wary of is the lack of information that many of the smaller agencies or freelance agents take advantage of. Toesave has brought up some strong examples of what can happen when you are doing a job when you don’t know all the facts.

If you feel like you are not getting the answers or are not sure of how the process or rules work Call the Labor Department and ask them for yourself.

Here is their number Taipei Labor Department: (02)8590-2567 Just ask for someone who speaks English.

[quote=“Aurora01”]Attention!

Foreigners in Taiwan can obtain work permit for acting/modeling MAXIMUM for 90 days, with the possibility to extend it for another 90 days period. Taiwan Council of Labor Affairs (CLA) can’t issue work-permits out of this time-limit for artistic jobs; therefore contracts that exceed this time-limit may lead you to a situation where you have a labor contract with a company that is not allowed to hire you. Thus, with a copy of the contract in CLA and without work permit, you may be treated as illegal worker.

A dear friend already got troubles due to this topic; hope you won’t be the next. Avoid complications and keep your labor contract within Taiwan law. Don’t trust agencies promising you ARC or more than 90 days work permit for artistic jobs, according with CLA it is not possible.

For foreigner actors/models, CLA suggests to sign 90-days contracts each time.[/quote]


#20
  1. Keep your options open: Compare different agencies. If possible work with more than one. Usually each agency has its own clients; with more than one agency you will have more opportunities. Don’t sign exclusive contract at least you get benefits that otherwise you won’t get, for example guarantee incomes.

  2. Contract: read and understand before sign. Keep a copy of your contract (!).

  3. Work permit: Don’t work without work permit or you may get deported. The government is paying a bonus (in cash) to the agency who reports illegal workers and restricting the rights to apply for work permits to the agencies who hire foreigners without proper documentation. It motivates competing agencies to report each other.

  4. Working hours: it is illegal to work more than 12 hours a day. You and your employer may get fined.

  5. Payment: Usually you get paid per hour(s). Generally speaking print-ads are better paid than TV commercials, which are better paid than internet commercials. If the videos or photos are released in more than one country, your incomes should increase, also if it airs more than a year. According with Toe 40% is the standard commission fee, so you should get 60% of the contract; make sure you get the right amount. I suggest extras to don’t work for less than 500nt per hour; support characters and main characters should charge more.

  6. Pay-day: Collect your money within 30 days. It is illegal to delay the payment more than 30 days. You can report it to the Department of Labor.

  7. Tax: Your tax rate depends on your residency status. Ask if your agency is paying your tax. You may be eligible for tax refund.

  8. Agency dilemma: Ask your agency to be transparent and share the information with you. Sometimes agencies care more about their self than about the talents career. Example: recently a client had to deal with an agency who threatened not to send the main character to the shoot if the client didn’t choose the extras from that agency; it was a gambling strategy than increased company’s benefits by risking main character’s job.

  9. Agencies war: For clients and talents it’s good to have more options but it is annoying to be in the middle of their fights. Work with the agencies that offer you better benefits and listen what they want to say but don’t take any position. It will save you troubles.

  10. Ask: if you have question or something is not clear ask(!). People with some experience like Toe, the agents, me or your friends can guide you and tell you where to find the information, but with important subjects it is best you check yourself with the government as landshark suggests.