NHI for Newborn of Foreign Parents


#1

Hello All,

Pardon me if I’m double posting, however, I couldn’t find this topic in my search. If the mods need to move this to Health please feel free, I just think the parents here might have some insight based on their experiences.

I hope to get some clarity on an point that seems to have been an issue in the past but I don’t know if it’s been resolved.

Foreign parents, with either an ARC or APRC, which have children born in Taiwan, are their newborns eligible for NHI?

If the newborns are eligible and which date or time does the NHI commence for them?

If there is any extra info I should know about this topic please feel free to inform.


#2

just ask your employer to put the kid in the NHI scheme - done!


#3

Sounds too easy.

I will ask thanks.


#4

I have not encountered this issue personally, so you’ll definitely have to check with the relevant authorities, but I have read in different forums that a child born of two foreign parents here in Taiwan is considered an “alien” for the first 6 months of his/her life, and is therefore not covered by the NHI during that period. This facebook group might be a good place to ask: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ForeignersForTaiwan/. It was originally created in support of children and spouses of foreign professionals, who face some crappy, discriminatory laws here - the people who run it could probably give you more info.
Good luck!


#5

I have read a similar post on Taiwanese
https://taiwanease.com/en/forums/national-health-insurance-newborn-with-foreign-parents-t11111.html

However that thread seems a little old and there are mentions on it that the Executive Yuan was planning on changing it. I would like to assume by now the change has been made.

I will have to look at the FB group and check there, thanks.


#6

I have read a similar post on Taiwanese
https://taiwanease.com/en/forums/national-health-insurance-newborn-with-foreign-parents-t11111.html

However that thread seems a little old and there are mentions on it that the Executive Yuan was planning on changing it. I would like to assume by now the change has been made.

I will have to look at the FB group and check there, thanks.


#7

Unfortunately, children born to two foreign parents are not eligible for NHI until they have resided in the country for six months. So six months after birth, as long as they don’t leave the country during those six months. Although they are not supposed to, some small clinics will use the mother’s nhi for the first 60 days after birth because that’s how the local children are handled. Big hospitals know the actual rule, though, and will make you pay for everything.

I highly recommend that you write to the nhi about this issue and complain as strongly as you can. They told me that the law would be changed last year, and there is still no news about it. Only by bringing to their attention how many people are affected by this will they be willing to make changes. We really need everyone’s help!


#8

nhi.gov.tw/English/webdata/w … ta_id=3148

Ask these guys.


#9

Point number three seems to mean that I will need to wait for 6 months.

3.Those who are unemployed but able to enroll as a dependent through a relative (i.e., parents, spouses, or children) could participate in the National Health Insurance program through a relative’s insurance registration organization after six months continuous residence in Taiwan.


#10

Here’s what I’ve found out from National Health Insurance Administration Ministry of Health and Welfare. http://www.nhi.gov.tw/English/index.aspx

I gave them a phone call at 02-2706-5866 extension 2221 for help in English. I spoke to two people Mrs. Zhuang and Iris, both of them were really nice and helpful.

It seems that foreign parents, with ARC or APRC, who have children born in Taiwan must wait a 6 month period until their newborn children are eligible to get medical coverage for their kids. The 6 month wait starts from the date your child gets their ARC.

The only work around is if the newborn children are employed. If they are able to get jobs i.e modelling then you might be able to get them National Health Insurance based on the fact that they are paying taxes and earning an income.

This seems like a law that really needs changing.


#11

It’s things like this that keep Taiwan a 3rd world country. Simply makes zero sense.


#12

Agreed, my wife and I both pay taxes and feel that this should be covered.

I can only imagine what it would cost if people had to send their newborn child to an ICU during that first 6 months.

Somethings about Taiwan are great but this is certainly a HUGE fail on their part.


#13

I’ve heard of a couple who’s child was born a month premature, and they had to pay upwards of 1 million nt in hospital bills. I can only imagine how awful it would be to have to deal with something like that.

What makes the situation worse for us is that since there are no anti-discrimination laws in Taiwan, insurance companies are allowed to deny newborn foreign babies from coverage. My husband and I went to almost every private insurance provider in the country, and none would insure a foreign baby at birth… Taiwanese, no problem. It’s terrible.

And in true Taiwanese fashion, when I spoke to people about this issue, they always said, “Why don’t you just go back to your country to have your baby?” As if it is so simple to uproot ones life. I’ve been living here for over a decade; this is my home.


#14

I totally agree with you on this topic. I think it is easy to say this is or could be discrimination. I don’t want to believe that it is but for some reason it just fits the bill so easily.

I’m now trying to find out if we incur any medical expenses during the first 6 months if we can get reimbursed when we get the NHI card. I suspect we won’t be able to but we’ll keep looking into it and whatever we find out we’ll post back here.


#15

[quote=“Tiare”]I’ve heard of a couple who’s child was born a month premature, and they had to pay upwards of 1 million nt in hospital bills. I can only imagine how awful it would be to have to deal with something like that.

What makes the situation worse for us is that since there are no anti-discrimination laws in Taiwan, insurance companies are allowed to deny newborn foreign babies from coverage. My husband and I went to almost every private insurance provider in the country, and none would insure a foreign baby at birth… Taiwanese, no problem. It’s terrible.

And in true Taiwanese fashion, when I spoke to people about this issue, they always said, “Why don’t you just go back to your country to have your baby?” As if it is so simple to uproot ones life. I’ve been living here for over a decade; this is my home.[/quote]

Well, they don’t see the problem because that is what they do. They go to have their baby in US, Canada, whatever. They are covered by NHI and assume your own country foots the bill here. Or at least, that it should. They go abroad, grab another passport for their collection, and get paid for it, by their private insurance companies. They assure a better future for the kid and a higher status for themselves. meanwhile, we are comapred to ticks, sucking away NHI resources. I mean, why would you have your baby here if it wasn’t like that? If they travel to have their baby abroad, why would anyone in their own right minds have a baby here? Obviously, you are up to something sneaky if you do. Since they risk their lives and their babies when traveling at 7 months pregnancy or more, they assume everyone can/should.

Sigh.


#16

Looks like there is relief on the way here

Babies born to foreign nationals to receive automatic health insurance


#17

Still in the works. Not yet approved and not yet in effect. But baby steps and all that jazz. At leats they are considering it.


#18

Apparently the hospitals will put the bills for the infant on the mothers NHI card for the first few months provided they are not very large. Also the six months doesnt seem to be set in stone, my son got the card after less than six months.


#19

Any update on this proposed law?


#20

Give them a call and check.