Possibility of Teaching ESL for Filipina Instructor


#2

It is not possible to legally work as an English teacher if you are from the Philippines. To get a work permit you need to be from one of the native speaking (their definition) countries (US, CA, GB, IR, AU, NZ and SA).


#3

…and yet there are Filipinas teaching English here…there are some other threads on here, search for them.


#4

Are you tied to the idea of Taiwan? China would be so much better for you, in terms of pay and ease of getting a work permit.


#5

They aren’t here working legally though. She will be able to get a job but she won’t get an ARC and will have to do visa runs.


#6

…not according to the other threads…perhaps hired as English consultants, stuff like that. a buxiban owner was claiming to have staff legally employed from Philippines etc.


#7

Not true–we’ve been over this previously.

Whether a person is a native speaker is determined by the countries’ official language or languages. The “seven nations” have yet to be substantiated anywhere official that I have seen, and I’ve been looking.

I recently sent an email to the Workforce Development Agency, hoping to eventually get a FAQ entry shown here: wda.gov.tw/en/home.jsp?pageno=201111180014

[quote]I have a question that I hope can be answered on your FAQ page. I have not been able to find an answer despite looking on many government websites, legal databases, etc. I have seen a lot of debate on line about this, and many people seem to be confused about it.

What qualifications are required to be hired as an instructor of English at a short-term supplementary education institute?[/quote]

I got this answer in a few days:

I bolded the pertinent section, translated: “The language taught should be an official language of the country of the instructor’s passport.”

What languages are official are determined by the Foreign Ministry:

wda.gov.tw/en/home.jsp?pagen … 1304230023

Official languages can be found here on the MOFA website:

mofa.gov.tw/CountryInfo.aspx … 8990406BA8

English is shown as an official language of the Philippines.

As far as this qualification goes, I don’t see any problem.


Does the government consider you a native English speaker?
Can an English school deny work permit if your first language isn't English?
#8

Okay. Show me a case where a work permit was granted to a Filipino English teacher.

You might be able to say that it is legal by the letter of the law but I am almost certain that the work permit would be denied if you could even find a buxiban to apply for it. That’s pretty shitty advice to give to someone that is moving to Taiwan specifically to teach English and is counting on a job.


#9

Why? I might ask you to show me a case where one was denied, but what are we going to do, hit the streets today and start asking passers-by? I’ve shown you what the law is. You’re making an assertion that I’m not correct. Show me any indication that the “seven nations” are a fact.

I’m not saying it’s legal by the letter of the law–I’m saying it’s the law. I’m not sure why people find this so hard to understand or accept. Why are you so certain it would be denied?

I’m not giving anyone any advice–I’m simply correcting your erroneous statement about the law. Certainly such questions should be answered on a factual basis. Whether it’s a good idea to come here based on other factors is a completely different question, which I did not touch on at all.


#10

Let’s rephrase it then.

I have never seen a school advertise a position looking for a Filipino (or any non 7 nation) English teacher that offered a work permit. I also have never heard of a work permit actually being approved outside of the 7 so called native speaking nations. Despite what the law says I would not be surprised if a work permit was denied for law reasons.


#11

English teachers work permit requires a degree from a “recognized” college, which is secret list of large schools the Taiwan govenment have decided are valid.

I’m guessing this is the barrier? Id be amazed if any SE Asian college were on this list.


#12

Not secret at all, the list is here:

fsedu.moe.gov.tw/home.aspx

There are quite a few in the Philippines; it’s not a restrictive list.

It’s clear to me that there is no legal barrier. The government has set the law; I don’t see why they couldn’t have spelled out what legal restrictions they wanted if they had cared to. The problem will be in getting hired, not in getting a work permit if hired.


#13

[quote=“Tempo Gain”]Not secret at all, the list is here:

fsedu.moe.gov.tw/home.aspx

There are quite a few in the Philippines; it’s not a restrictive list.

It’s clear to me that there is no legal barrier. The government has set the law; I don’t see why they couldn’t have spelled out what legal restrictions they wanted if they had cared to. The problem will be in getting hired, not in getting a work permit if hired.[/quote]

That last sentence is the crux of the issue. A few years ago, I met a few chaps from the Philippines who found that to be just the case. They eventually did find schools, but it was a hard slog indeed, and they did face wage discrimiation.


#14

Hi guys! Thanks for the inputs!

May I ask if the similar case will happen if she pursued a teaching gig in Science (not ESL)? Will she have a hard time securing permits and all? Sorry if the question is noob and obviously, I don’t want my girlfriend get into jail. :slight_smile:

Thanks again guys!


#15

ive met few filipino teaching in a buxiban legally. i guess it should’nt be a problem. In MOFA website,you’ll find that philippines local language are:tagalog and english. just saying.


#16

well im working in a buxiban as ESL teaher.im from the philippines. any question?


#17

Good to know, did you run into any obstacles?


#18

This is great news. I am assuming that you have a work permit for teaching in a buxiban. Correct? No dual citizenship? Attended a Philippino university?


#19

[quote=“anabanana”]Hi guys! Thanks for the inputs!

May I ask if the similar case will happen if she pursued a teaching gig in Science (not ESL)? Will she have a hard time securing permits and all? Sorry if the question is noob and obviously, I don’t want my girlfriend get into jail. :slight_smile:

Thanks again guys![/quote]

Ask your friend to send her resume here:
dishs.tp.edu.tw/Careers.html

There are several Filipina teachers on residence. Some of the nuns are Filipina as well.


#20

I think it would be harder for one from the Phillippines to get an English teaching gig in Taipei. One reason is the accent. Parents and schools want American accents. The second that nobody is talking about is the discrimination. A lot of the Filipinos here are care givers and house keepers. Unless you have perfect American English, I feel like you may have a harder time than someone with similar experience and education level but different skin color.
Taiwanese Buxiban Hierarchy?: White > ABC > Black > Filipinos


#21

if you can do the job better thn others,why they cant hire you?
i dont really know why most of the taiwanese are looking for american english accent?well in fact,taiwan is situated in asia.