Some practical advice from A Japanese


#1

It seems everybody sort of “knows” how to tidy up and clean a place (living space or office space).
But one person claims to have an almost magical method of making it stick.
If you laugh when you read this, you may have become infected. :wink:

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up (The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing)
Marie Kondo
nytimes.com/2014/10/23/garde … kondo.html

人生がときめく片づけの魔法
近藤麻理恵
サンマーク出版(Sunmark Publishers)


#2

I’m not going to lie. I’m really bad at cleaning and just kind of guess my through it all until stuff looks decently clean. It’s an embarrassment and a frequent source of aggravation for the mirses, but I just don’t know how to change. :frowning:


#3

I’m a really disorganized person too, and it annoys me. When I clean up I feel a lot better. The problem is I can never find stuff when I’ve organised it “logically”.

I can endorse this particular bit of advice though:

I hate the modern obsession with loads of little bits of paper, most of which are produced and retained as “proof” that something happened. There must surely be a better way than that.


#4

Bold is where my wife goes horribly wrong and can’t be changed. In my ever-so humble opinion.
Me? I think I’m already at the Kondo level. Perhaps I should start hiring out my services.


#5

I just put nails in the walls and hang everything on them. It looks ridiculous but it works so well… one of the upsides to being a bachelor.


#6

… and you’re STILL a bachelor, aren’t you?

I used to be very clean and organised until I married a Taiwanese woman, to whom housework was cleaning the floor daily, but letting all else slide. Later I realised that she needed but didn’t wear glasses, so she never saw the dirt. By then it was too late.

getting rid of stuff when you’re married is SOOO much harder than when you’re single, as both people have to agree that something is not needed any more. that’ll never happen for 99% of the stuff i regard as junk. Ergo, clutter and mess for all those IMPORTANT pieces of paper with expired passwords from 10 years ago, just in case.