Study Ph.D in Taiwan or China?

mainlandchina

#1

I’m looking at studying in Asia, preferably back in Taiwan, but then again I think China brings a competitive edge in terms of challenges from classmates and getting to build connections in a much bigger plain.

I’m looking at Beijing’s Chinghwa University, or Taiwan’s Dharma Drum.

Not sure which to study, either Buddhism or Business.

I have an MBA in business, and actually got rejected by Dharma Drum this year after applying for Ph.D. They prefer to have Ph.D students with master degree in buddhism as well.

What are the pros and cons of studying in China vs Taiwan?

Please advise,
Thanks


#2

I believe it’s spelled Tsing Hwa University, and it is by every measure imaginable the better school. China, hands down. PhDs in Taiwan take forever (I know a few people in their eighth or so year of liberal arts degrees) and are not valuable outside of Taiwan. Even within the country, it will get you an extra few thousand a month, but not much else.

Even better, get a PhD from a Western (or Japanese) university and do some of your research in China or Taiwan.


#3

If you are looking to study Buddhism, then I’d say Dharma Drum, although it isn’t easy to get in. In terms of academic studies, Dharma Drum is very open to all schools of thought. Buddhist text philology is a booming field and Dharma drum does a good job at it because people here have no trouble understanding Chinese translations, and there are good English reference sources for Pali Tipitaka out there. Outside of Dharma Drum, only Fuyan Institute and a few others would be worth your time.

Buddhism studies is very well established in Japan though.

As for business, it’d be a lot more useful to do it in Japan or the US.


#4

[quote=“hansioux”]If you are looking to study Buddhism, then I’d say Dharma Drum, although it isn’t easy to get in. In terms of academic studies, Dharma Drum is very open to all schools of thought. Buddhist text philology is booming new field and Dharma drum does a good job at it because people here have no trouble understanding Chinese translations, and there are good English reference sources for Pali Tipitaka out there. Outside of Dharma Drum, or though, probably Fuyan Institute and a few others would be worth your time.

Buddism studies is very well established in Japan though.

As for business, it’d be a lot more useful to do it in Japan or the US.[/quote]

I applied to DDM this year, got in first round but failed miserably at the written and oral exam.
It’s a lot harder than expected, but then I was so close, so I’m going to try again next year.
Have been to a few more meditation classes hosted by them too.

I went to see Tsinghwa University this year after I didn’t get into DDM.
The college environment there is quite attractive, as China is a lot more positive now, thanks to communist’s ban of negative or contrasting views.
Business degree there is just to get to know their system, and actually I’ve been a lot more lenient on communism these days.

The question right now is that it seems like Buddhism is a study that requires meditation, and a Ph.D degree actually deters one from being empty and enlightened.

But then again, Taiwan is still home, and even though China has its upside, I’m quite hesitant about going to China especially Beijing, due to the weather and pollution.

Gotta pray more!?!


#5

[quote=“Hokwongwei”]I believe it’s spelled Tsing Hwa University, and it is by every measure imaginable the better school. China, hands down. PhDs in Taiwan take forever (I know a few people in their eighth or so year of liberal arts degrees) and are not valuable outside of Taiwan. Even within the country, it will get you an extra few thousand a month, but not much else.

Even better, get a PhD from a Western (or Japanese) university and do some of your research in China or Taiwan.[/quote]

You’re right on the spelling, good one, Chinghwa is the Taiwan spelling.

Taiwanese education system just take advantage of students, in terms of publication and time, and then the professors take advantage of them.

China seems to have a lot more respect for Ph.D students, and then again the degree would of course open many new doors, I have no idea what I would do after I graduate from DDM Ph.D program.

I’m actually not that interested in Japan or USA, but I might consider looking into Europe.

Thanks for the help :notworthy:


#6

[quote]
The college environment there is quite attractive, as China is a lot more positive now, thanks to communist’s ban of negative or contrasting views.[/quote]

That sounds like a terrible environment for academic studies. Although if banning of contrasting views is what you like, you are perfectly suited for most Buddhist schools here in Taiwan. Forget about Dharma Drum, it sounds like the wrong school for you. There are tons of other Buddhist graduate schools that are strongly against non-orthodox ideas, and are proponents of students pumping out regurgitated works.

Not really. It’s Tsing Hua here in Taiwan, hence NTHU.


#7

[quote=“hansioux”][quote]
The college environment there is quite attractive, as China is a lot more positive now, thanks to communist’s ban of negative or contrasting views.[/quote]

Not really. It’s Tsing Hua here in Taiwan, hence NTHU.[/quote]

Haha, you Taiwan-centric peeps…it’s Tsinghua as well as it was established pre-pinyin.
tsinghua.edu.cn/publish/newthuen/

I wouldn’t think that the mainland would be a good place to study buddhism given the censorship - what are the advantages of studying there? Also, Tsinghua is more hard-sciences, so that is interesting that they have something like that there.

I have heard that HKU is very strong for buddhist studies. Hand to god, I once met a Sweedish model at a meditation retreat that was doing a Phd in Buddhist studies there


#8

[quote=“zeinstein”]

Haha, you Taiwan-centric peeps…it’s Tsinghua as well as it was established pre-pinyin.
tsinghua.edu.cn/publish/newthuen/

I wouldn’t think that the mainland would be a good place to study buddhism given the censorship - what are the advantages of studying there? Also, Tsinghua is more hard-sciences, so that is interesting that they have something like that there.

I have heard that HKU is very strong for buddhist studies. Hand to god, I once met a Sweedish model at a meditation retreat that was doing a Phd in Buddhist studies there[/quote]

There are actually some famous Buddhist scholars over there in China, although they consider their works not religious and just strictly philological. They have the benefits of ownership of new archeological discoveries, which enable them to publish new findings. Although, Buddhists texts are difficult to understand, so they have the material but often draw the wrong conclusions, either from the lack of knowledge or some other political bullshit.

Buddhist texts were translated since the late Han dynasty (100 A.D.), and often translated by non-Chinese. Many aspects of Buddhist philology research requires people with some knowledge into how people spoke back during Han and Tang dynasty, as some of the word choices were less in line with official writing. A lot of the phonetic translations would also depend on Old Chinese reading of characters. That’s where knowing Taigi (Taiwanese Holo) comes in handy, since Taigi preserved a good amount of both Old and Middle Chinese.


#9

[quote=“hansioux”][quote=“zeinstein”]

Haha, you Taiwan-centric peeps…it’s Tsinghua as well as it was established pre-pinyin.
tsinghua.edu.cn/publish/newthuen/

I wouldn’t think that the mainland would be a good place to study buddhism given the censorship - what are the advantages of studying there? Also, Tsinghua is more hard-sciences, so that is interesting that they have something like that there.

I have heard that HKU is very strong for buddhist studies. Hand to god, I once met a Sweedish model at a meditation retreat that was doing a Phd in Buddhist studies there[/quote]

There are actually some famous Buddhist scholars over there in China, although they consider their works not religious and just strictly philological. They have the benefits of ownership of new archeological discoveries, which enable them to publish new findings. Although, Buddhists texts are difficult to understand, so they have the material but often draw the wrong conclusions, either from the lack of knowledge or some other political bullshit.

Buddhist texts were translated since the late Han dynasty (100 A.D.), and often translated by non-Chinese. Many aspects of Buddhist philology research requires people with some knowledge into how people spoke back during Han and Tang dynasty, as some of the word choices were less in line with official writing. A lot of the phonetic translations would also depend on Old Chinese reading of characters. That’s where knowing Taigi (Taiwanese Holo) comes in handy, since Taigi preserved a good amount of both Old and Middle Chinese.[/quote]

I’ll try both schools next year, and maybe some Japanese, Hong Kong and Korean universities.

Thanks a lot!

Hallelujah$


#10

Almost every Japan, Korea, and HK university is better in terms of recognition and reputation overseas (and actual quality of degree) than any Taiwanese university. And where exactly will a PhD in Buddhism get you?


#11

Urodacus,

It gives me a peace of mind.

James

:pray:


#12

Why do you want a PhD? You want to be an academic?

If so, neither Taiwan nor China. In Asia, maybe Japan, Singapore or Hong Kong…but you’ll still be looked down upon.

Do not go to a religious university.

If you don’t want to be an academic, professor, etc, it don’t matter.


#13

[quote=“Confuzius”]Why do you want a PhD? You want to be an academic?

If so, neither Taiwan nor China. In Asia, maybe Japan, Singapore or Hong Kong…but you’ll still be looked down upon.

Do not go to a religious university.

If you don’t want to be an academic, professor, etc, it don’t matter.[/quote]

I’m not going into academics, I just want to fulfill my lifetime dream, but yeah Japan and Singapore seems to be more academic than China or Taiwan.

Then again, China is going up, Taiwan is going nowhere, and Japan is definitely on the downward slope.

Perhaps I’ll just apply to all three countries, Taiwan, China and Japan.

Thanks!?!

:discodance: