Taiwanese comedian Chu Ke-liang dead at age 70, are you a fan?


#1

#2

I detest Taiwanese variety shows with a passion, so no, not a fan. But I’m sure he’ll be sorely missed by a lot of people.


#3

I’m a fan of the way he ties the microphone around his neck, his cool hairstyle, and always having beautiful women around him. A Taiwan icon and a perspective from years past even though he continues to be popular today.


#4

I enjoyed a lot of his movies, such as the one where he went back in time to early 1900s Japan ruled Taiwan and the one where his daughter was marrying a mainlander. Both very funny.
Yup, will miss him and that crazy hairstyle


#5

He was a creep and one of the reasons why Taiwanese is regarded as a crass language, so no.


#6

In the past, Taiwanese-speaking actors may not compete with Mandarin-speaking actors for roles that are classic.
Hence, the only role he could act was some funny clowns.

It’s the same in Hollywood, where Asian actors can only survive by acting some kung-fu clowns.


#7

The guy who looked like Moe. He did all right with no Larry or Curly.

Taiwanese humor seems to tend toward the twee. Dad jokes and the like. Too-gentle humor, for weak laughs. What Taiwan needs is a good custard pie in the face.

Slapstick. It’s not sophisticated, but at least it’s got energy.


#8

Did he have some type of bad reputation?


#9

He went through four wives, had various affairs, neglected his children, went into hiding for ten years to escape his huge gambling debts, leaving his children and other relatives as targets for the mob collectors, refused to have his colon cancer treated, sending his loved ones on an emotional roller coaster ride, etc., etc.


#10

In short, he was a typical celebrity.


#11

By American standards, for sure. But this is Taiwan, where celebrities cry like little girls on TV after they get caught smoking a joint.


#12

I don’t care about how many wives or affairs he’d had or how negligent he’d been to his children, he was regarded as a creep because he often made really disgusting comments about women’s bodies and there was probably a lot of groping as well. In short, he’s gross.


#13

Actual affairs (and negligence) = okay

Crass comments = NOT okay

At least you have your priorities straight.


#14

And this is why men make crass comments about women.

Not helping the cause of women’s lib here.


#15

RUUUUUUUUUUBBBBBBISHHHHHH.

Men make crass comments about women because they are simple, ignorant fools who cannot separate their cocks from their conscious thoughts.


#16

He was an institution.

His daughter is pretty cute (but way too tall though)
Jeannie Hsieh


#17

When women make crass comments about men, we laugh it off.


#18

I am not really a fan of Ti-ko-liōng’s comedy. My memory of him largely consists of his ads for his club shows between the innings when I used to listen to baseball games on the radio as a kid.

However, I think saying that Ti-ko-liōng is one of the main factors for Taigi to be considered as crass is like victim blaming. It was the KMT dictatorship and its followers that tried to paint Taigi as crass, in order to dislodge Taigi as the lingua franca. They also helped their cause by killing most Taigi speaking elites during the 228 incident and subsequent white terror.

Sure a lot of Ti-ko-liōng’s contents were crass. He objectified women, many of his jokes were sexual harassments. However, that was back when even Taigi opera (kua-á-hì) and Puppet shows (pòo-tē-hì) were considered crass. When a form of Taigi entertainment became too popular, the KMT will shut it down. That included Taigi movies, once much more popular than any Mandarin movies, and televised puppet shows.

At the same time Taiwanese were kept from all public jobs, including teaching, public official jobs. All the society’s resources were controlled by the KMT, meaning it’s also hard for Taiwanese to be entrepreneurs and start businesses. A lot of frustrations of the Taigi speaking public did not have an outlet. Many people couldn’t even diss the dictatorship in the private of their homes, in fear of their children repeating what they said in schools. During the white terror era, you say the wrong things, the KMT would be coming for you. So people more or less gave up on their aspirations and indulge themselves with whatever money they’ve got. That gave crass shows an opportunity to take hold.

In an environment simply hostile to Taigi, Ti-ko-liōng’s crassness basically kept transmission of Taigi through entertainment under KMT’s radar, and kept it alive. It was essentially the only form of Taigi entertainment allowed. Many Taiwanese born in the the 70s or early 80s would say their interest in learning Taigi were kept alive because of Ti-ko-liōng’s shows.

Despite his crassness, Ti-ko-liōng wasn’t oblivious to that fact. He deliberately worked in a lot of traditional Taigi art into his shows. That included traditional folk songs, old location names, differences of Taigi between regions, and old Taiwanese customs. Many Taigi singers also only had his club shows as a performance outlet.


#19

That’s an amazing description thank you.

Every culture has their own entertainers and even government officials that objectify women and sexual harassment. Trump for example covers both of those, entertainment and government.


#20

That is his personal life and I couldn’t care less about that, but in public what he did and said was off-putting.

And for those who claim that it’s double standards for women to make crass comments about men to be acceptable. YES. It is ok for women to make crass comments about men because the power balance is completely in men’s favour.