1000cc sportbike first bike crash story/ riding pants

I just read this story in an American forum:

[b]Rather than be silently ashamed, I tell this story to anyone who will listen, in the hope that someone will learn from my mistake. TAKE THE RIDER COURSE BEFORE RIDING!!! Do not do what I did.

April 2005. I don’t recall ever having put a leg over a motorcycle. So, of course, at 28 years old I decide that I want a motorcycle. I have a few friends who ride and all of them, thankfully, are responsible riders who share a distaste for squids. I didn’t listen to them when they encouraged me to take the rider course before buying a bike. I also failed to listen when they advised me to buy something inexpensive, used and with moderate power. I failed to heed the advice of the well-intentioned, if condescending, salesman at a dealership who practically begged me not to buy a Superbike. Did I listen? No. I knew that I was doing something that most would consider to be ill-advised. I admitted it freely but did it anyway. 2003 Ducati 999. First motorcycle EVER. Can you see this story going anywhere good?

It was a magnificent day in mid April. Predictions were for blue skies, low humidity and mid 70s, which was unusally warm for so early in the spring in Massachusetts. The dealership delivered the bike. I was, thankfully, smart enough not to try to ride it home on busy streets from the dealership without ever having ridden before. The plan was for my good friend, who took the MSF course and has been riding safely for 15 years, to give me a slow and easy introduction to riding around my quiet neighborhood. After a few laps around the block in first gear, I felt as though I was getting a feel for it. I was timid and was too scared to exceed 10 MPH but it was glorious. Everyone was out in their yards washing their cars or raking their yards. As I rode around on my sparkling, red, Ducati, women swooned, men gawked, children cheered. Mine was the world and all that’s in it.

I decided to take a little longer loop and found myself at the intersection of a busier road and decided to go for it since I would only be on it for 50 feet until reaching the next side street. I let out the clutch a little to fast which caused the bike to buck a little. The bucking caused the throttle to roll slightly under my hand and that sent me careening across the street (thankfully I had waited until no cars were in sight). I might have been able to bring it back under control had it not been for the patch of sand in the road that was left over from the last snow storm. The rear whee spun and then hooked up an instant later and in less than a second and less than 15 feet, my beautiful day was ruined. Because I had been going so slowly, I escaped with nothing more than a nicely skinned knee and badly wounded ego. I was so shaken by the experience that, when I tried to pick up the bike, I ended up dropping it over on the good side!!! I didn’t know whether to cry, scream or vomit. The feeling was terrible.

It’s amazing how many pieces get damaged when a bike goes down like that. It’s even more amazing how expensive they are to replace when they all have to come from Italy. Due to a series of errors made by the parts department at the dealership that did the repairs, it took nearly 8 weeks to get my bike back. My insurance had only a $500 deductible but the accident sent my premiums through the roof (the “no fault” auto insurance system in Massachusetts is among the worst in the nation so rates are outrageous).

The total bill for the repairs was $4700 and I still feel that I got off easy. I could have been badly hurt. I had no idea how much power was in my hands or how to control the bike properly. Thankfully, I am a firm believer in minimizing risk so I was going slowly and staying in my neighborhood but I had no business being on that bike without some quality instruction.

I took the cours shortly after getting my bike back. In the meantime, my friend walked me through some of the basics in a large parking lot using his 50cc two stroke Derbi (incredibly fun to ride). By the time I got to the course, I had a few hours of riding my own bike under my belt but the course was incredible. I can’t say enough good things about it. I think of the lessons every time I ride. I firmly believe that I would not have spilled my bike if I had taken the $175 course prior to riding. that would have saved me the $500 deductible and a small fortune on my insurance premiums. It would have spared me a lot of embarrassment and many weeks of lost riding.

The spill did, however, teach me the value of good riding gear. My padded riding jacket prevented any injury to my arms or upper body. My jeans shredded instantly at the knee and lef tme with a nasty road rash on one knee that took weeks to heal and left an ugly scar. Jeans do very little to protect. They are, of course, better than shorts, but not by a whole lot. Purpose-made riding pants are a worthwhile investment.

Ask any EMT and you will hear the same thing. You can bleed to death just as easily from road rash as you can from a bad cut. The difference is that it’s easier to stop the bleeding from a bad cut because it’s a single point of blood loss. With bad road rash, you bleed from everywhere at once and there is no single wound on which to apply pressure. It’s just like suffering a 3rd degree burn. Anyone who has ever seen someone get road rash scrubbed out (“debrided”) with that lovely wire brush will agree that $150 for a good pair of riding pants is worth it.

I admit that I still go out for quick rides to the store wearing just jeans. I know that it’s probably not wise and I really should wear the pants ALL the time. However, any time that I am really going out for a spirited ride, I wear the pants. The pants are Joe Rocket and they areactually made of mesh so they are cooler on hot days than jeans while providing far better protection. [/b]

I hear these kinds of stories all the time here in Taiwan. Guy buys 1000cc sportbike…and crashes it within a block of the dealership. I bet this type of story happens monthly if not weekly in Taiwan.

Heck, I met a guy a few weeks ago who had never even ridden an RZR before…and he went out and bought a 1000 CBR. He luckily seems to be doing ok on it…but he couldn’t keep up with my 70hp bike for the life of him. :unamused:

Anyone see any riding pants in Taiwan? I mean other than the full fledged racing ones?

Mordeth

I’ll be in the UK shortly for a couple of weeks, if you know your size and what you want I could pick you up some pants…an excuse to go in the bike store if nothing else.

[quote=“Edgar Allen”]Mordeth

I’ll be in the UK shortly for a couple of weeks, if you know your size and what you want I could pick you up some pants…an excuse to go in the bike store if nothing else.[/quote]

I won’t have ANY extra money for at least 2 months. But if you can wait…then… I’m a 28 inch (30 is ok too) waist…and I’m 6 foot tall. I’d like something with the “least” protection. Like jeans with a bit of extra protection for city riding. Hopefully ventilated.

Mind you, I can always borrow money from someone if waiting is a problem. MJB?

[quote=“Mordeth”]the well-intentioned, if condescending, salesman at a dealership who practically begged me not to buy a Superbike.

I hear these kinds of stories all the time here in Taiwan.[/quote]I bet you don’t hear that part of the story…

[quote=“redwagon”][quote=“Mordeth”]the well-intentioned, if condescending, salesman at a dealership who practically begged me not to buy a Superbike.

I hear these kinds of stories all the time here in Taiwan.[/quote]I bet you don’t hear that part of the story…[/quote]

Depends on the dealership…some do.

The usual response to the dealer trying to talk them into something smaller is “But the 600 and the 1000 aren’t very different in price…I’d have to be stupid to pay so much for the 600 when the 1000 is only a little more.” And " My friends all have 1000s, I can’t get anything smaller if I want to ride with them." :loco: .

Lots could be said about people wanting to ride and buying the wrong bike…but it always comes down to the “ego” and “look at me” factors that most often steer new buyers towards the baddest machine out there…For Taiwan, as much as we’d like to try and talk down a local from buying a 1000cc sportbike as a first bike, they seldom listen nor care because they have to keep up with the Jones’s (or Chen’s in this case) in the bike team…

Where they go all wrong is by thinking that by getting a 1000cc bike they are getting the most “race” style bike available…but anyone in the know is well aware that the latest generation of 600cc sportbikes are closer to being serious race replicas than the current crop of 1000cc sportbikes. The 1000cc bikes are still significantly more powerful, but not as track focused as the 600s.

I say, let them hang out with their teams and crash their bikes all they want…that’s how they’ll learn!

Thanks for posting that, Mordeth. A cautionary tale indeed. And doubly a shame when you consider that owning a superbike does not necessary equate to having the most fun. (Or so I am told!)

[quote=“Mordeth”]Anyone see any riding pants in Taiwan? I mean other than the full fledged racing ones?[/quote]I got mine from Gochen in Taichung. They’re AXO, they’re made from Cordura and they have removable CE armour for the knees and shins.

I’ve been riding motorcycles for most of my life and I wouldn’t go for a 1000 cc Ducati! I know my limits and riding style, I guess.

You know what I say, cheaper used parts for me!

Just bought riding pants but I usually ride with full out shin/knee guards. I’ve seen reinforced jeans at motorcycle apparel websites too.

Some of my friends wear underarmor or knee pads made for dirtbike use. I usually wear full leathers as I’m still a beginner, although occasionally for short trips I wear jeans. I prob consider getting a mesh pant.

Kevlar reinforced jeans might be another option. They don’t have armour, but might at least prevent some roadrash.

dragginjeans.com/index.htm
dragginjeans.com.au/
(The products are similar but slightly different I think).

Mordeth, next time I’m in the vicinity of the Gochen shop I’ll check to see whether they still have Cordura pants.

there is a big dainese store here in taipei.

PRO SHOP TAIPEI
The new Dainese Pro Shop based in Taipei City was officially inaugurated on May 15th, 2006.
The new Pro Shop stands near the Ducati store in downtown Taipei along the main road that leads to the central train station.

Here’s the new store’s address and telephone number:
No.58, Sec.3, Chengde Rd., Datong District
00103 - TAIPEI CITY - TAIWAN
Tel.: 02-25920088

Dainese all the way. It’s the only brand I ever buy. Have been in 2 serious crashes, and when I mean serious I mean serious, and both times came out with only a few bruises around my joints, but no road rash. Both times I was wearing Dainese leathers. And unless I’m riding around town, I always where my full suit when I’m riding. As they say, “better to sweat than to bleed.”

BTW, for those of you thinking of buying a suit, make sure it fits tightly. A loose suit will cause it to rub and twist your skin around when your skidding on the road after a crash. And I can’t over emphasize the importance good gloves, make sure they have kelvar or carbon around the knuckles and good padding in the finger and palm areas. Your hands are usually the first and last things that touch the ground in most slide outs.

Home we had a system I think was good.

You could get the license on the 125cc when you was 16, but was limited too 15hp.

So all those racing 125 from italy and japan had special parts to bring them down to 15hp.

When you turned 18 you could take the license for big bike and would be limited too 50hp? until you where 20?

So then you could keep your 125cc and just instal the original parts and show it to the viecle regestry for aproval and you could drive with 32hp.

I see no reason for buing a 1000cc. They are huge ands heavy and a 600 would be asier to deal with both in weight and power.

I don’t nead to worry about this things since my GF say I can not have every time I sugest a big bike and I honestly prefere sex over the big bike so she get hear way.

[quote=“Stian”]Home we had a system I think was good.

You could get the license on the 125cc when you was 16, but was limited too 15hp.

So all those racing 125 from Italy and Japan had special parts to bring them down to 15hp.

When you turned 18 you could take the license for big bike and would be limited too 50hp? until you where 20?

So then you could keep your 125cc and just instal the original parts and show it to the viecle regestry for aproval and you could drive with 32hp.

I see no reason for buing a 1000cc. They are huge ands heavy and a 600 would be asier to deal with both in weight and power.

I don’t nead to worry about this things since my GF say I can not have every time I sugest a big bike and I honestly prefere sex over the big bike so she get hear way.[/quote]

I wish every country used that system. It would be better for everyone…including the manufacturers of the bikes…since they’d sell more bikes like that.

Go with a 600cc if you aren’t used to riding on the roads here.

Riding a 1000cc here is like swinging a baseball bat with weight donuts. Demanding too, if you ride the twistys here (I don’t know how those Harley/Goldwing riders do it) but it will make you a better rider in the end. Jumping on a CBR 600 F4i in the States after a few months of riding a FireBlade here was exhilerating.

Leathers are a must (see MC Rider’s post) but they don’t hold up well if soaked through by torrential rains.

I don’t have any regrets about buying a supposed “beginners bike” and like Mordeth, have seen many worse idiots in the big bike world than myself…Something I was slightly self-concious about when making the purchase. A nice surprise was that spending 16 years on an RZ didn’t drop my big bike riding skills nearly as much as I thought it might.

Coming back on the Suao gong lou a few weekends back, The traffic was horrid, and I was doing a lot of passing. At one stage, heeled over into a pretty good lean, a cruiser type decides he’s going to pass me on the inside. He gets about 2/3rds of the corner, and then the sparks fly as he grounds pipes and pegs all in one go. Silly bugger could have killed both of us trying to show off to his passenger, who responded to his bravado by hitting him repeatedly for the next 2km’s or so.

I wouldn’t buy a liter bike even now…All I hear from most people I run into are complaints that they can’t really ever run their bikes out to their full potential, even if they truly had the ability to do so.

I’m having a shitload of fun on my “entry level” 650, and I can choose to cruise at 80kph in 4th, 5th, or sixth gear and still have usable power even at 3,000RPM. With my Ventura touring bag setup and the Awesome Oxford tank bag I received from Joesax as a gift, it’s also a damn fine tourer.

Spend the day romping in the mountains, and then spoil yourself at the destination with a nice room in a luxury hotel…Yeah, I can get used to this :sunglasses:

I wear a Dainese armor mesh jacket, with knee guards and Jeans. I need to upgrade the pants as well, so checking out the dedicated Dainese dealer will be something I do soon.

The shop at the left side of this bike shop (same owner BTW):
forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopic.php?t=51379
sell Jeans with build-in knee & waist (?) protector…I wear it all the time in this hot summer weather…just like wearing regular jeans but with additional protection

[quote=“StreetSpec”]The shop at the left side of this bike shop (same owner BTW):
forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopic.php?t=51379
sell Jeans with build-in knee & waist (?) protector…I wear it all the time in this hot summer weather…just like wearing regular jeans but with additional protection[/quote]

That’s what I want. Now as soon as I can sell something…or intimidate my ex into giving me some money…then I’ll go buy some. :s

[quote=“StreetSpec”]The shop at the left side of this bike shop (same owner BTW):
forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopic.php?t=51379
sell Jeans with build-in knee & waist (?) protector…I wear it all the time in this hot summer weather…just like wearing regular jeans but with additional protection[/quote]What about the actual fabric? Do they use Kevlar, like the Draggin’ Jeans?