1815 Treasured Map of England, Scotland & Wales

A fascinating map from 1815 - England, Scotland & Wales…just fascinating.
Link directly to map:
buffalo.edu/news/hires/WSmithMap.jpg

[quote]Treasured Map Lures Geologists to Buffalo
Release date: Tuesday, October 4, 2005

BUFFALO, N.Y. – When University at Buffalo planetary volcanologist Tracy Gregg mentioned at a recent geology conference that the Buffalo and Erie County Public Library was this fall exhibiting an original edition of the world’s first geologic map, audience members were captivated.

“People were coming up to me afterward, asking when would be the best time to come to Buffalo to see the map and what hotel should they stay at,” she said. “I wouldn’t be surprised if hundreds of geologists end up coming to Buffalo to see it.”

This original, signed edition of the first series of geologic maps ever created is one of only two in the United States; the other is at the Library of Congress. The map is accompanied by a descriptive pamphlet series. There are just 43 known originals of the map in the world today.

Dubbed “The Map that Changed the World,” by Simon Winchester in his popular 2001 book, the hand-tinted, 10-foot-by-six-foot map is on exhibit at the Central Library branch of the Buffalo and Erie County Public Library, One Lafayette Square.

“If geology were a religion, this map would be its bible,” said Robert Jacobi, Ph.D., UB professor of geology.(more at link)
buffalo.edu/news/fast-execut … e=75490009[/quote]

Wow! Just … WOW! Absolutely fascinating. And you can see the town where I was raised. Thanks for posting that, TC. :bravo:
How I’d love to see it full-sized.

When I was in the UK last year I read the Winchester book and saw the original map at Burlington House in London the week after I finished the book. You have to call ahead to make arrangements to see it.
As a trained geologist, it was the fullfillment of a longtime wish of mine. My old undergrad classmates and I had an informal “geology top 50” of places to go and things to see, in which the Smith map ranked fairly highly.