20,000 year old civilization in Taiwan

Pardon if this was posted somewhere else, but I found an interesting article that says there was a civilization here 20,000 years ago. Very interesting stuff:

http://www.reuters.com/article/worldNews/idUSTRE56N0QT20090724

Please post if you have a link to more details. I wonder how this compares to the findings in Monte Verde, Chile: [wikipedia]Monte Verde[/wikipedia]

In my dealings with anthropologists, academics in this field, my own research, civilization in Taiwan goes back at least 35,000 years.
See thewildeast.net/news
look for ‘unpaving paradise’

[quote=“yaoshema”]In my dealings with anthropologists, academics in this field, my own research, civilization in Taiwan goes back at least 35,000 years.
See thewildeast.net/news
look for ‘unpaving paradise’[/quote]
Define “civilization”.

It’s not exactly Mesopotamia.

Evidence of human habitation is hardly “civilization.” Just look at Glasgow.

If they had a language back then, they had a society and a culture. That’s good enough for me. Although the usual definition requires a written history and a written language.

Written language? Written history? Many great civilisations like the Celts only had oral histories for 1000s of years.

Most historians define 'civilization" as having the ability to brew beer. Oh, and sacred rituals related to its consumption.
And by these two counts, I’m a one-man highly developed civilization. :slight_smile:

There are many, many archaeological sites around Taiwan and even in the Taipei basin. Many of them have not even been excavated yet and I am certain only a fraction have been discovered.
I have been to several abandoned, half - excavated sites and found them littered with equipment, samples and even bones. This says something for the respect the Taiwanese government - and the researchers themselves, have for the history of Taiwan.

Some historical sites resemble sites from other parts of the world, like these standing stones near the border of Hualien and Taidung. These look much like the standing stones found in Europe, particularly the (Celtic) UK and France.

It’s a shame that Taiwan does not invest more in archeaological research. There is some pretty convincing evidence that many of the south-east Asian cultures are either mixed with or actually originated from Taiwan. Although most of the population is made up of Chinese descent these days, it is very difficult not to note the striking similarities, both in appearance and culture, between the people of the Phillipines, Thailand and Indonesia and the idigenous people of Taiwan.
Regarding another post in this forum (did it all start in Taiwan?), if the today’s Taiwanese aboriginals have their roots in south east-Asia or the southern area of today’s China, or better still, if some south-east Asian cultures take some of their culture and blood from the indigenous people of Taiwan through migration, then in my book, as far as history is concerned, the people who occupied this land 20 or even 30,000 years ago should be classed as a civilisation as they would have been numerous and wide spread enough throughout Asia to be classed as such.

Agreed. That’s more than good enough for me.

The issue might be more about proof - if it’s not written down then it can become lost. How much about the Druids has survived?

I’ve seen those two standing stones in the HuaDong rift valley and some other artefacts nearby. I have also seen a weird stone that looked like it was an ancient weathered statue in the Longtan area. The above stones are indeed similar in appearance to standing stones in celtic areas although that’s most likely coincidental. Actually the standing stones in Celtic areas pre-dates the celts and belongs to another civilisation whose language and culture we know very little about.

There are also legends about little black people living in Nantou etc. They may have been remnants of Austronesian tribes from earlier migrations into the Pacific or simply a dark skinned tribe of aborigines, who knows. Then there have been amazing finds in Indonesia of ‘flores man’ which was probably another species of human. Lots we don’t know about I’m sure.

Agreed. That’s more than good enough for me. The issue might be more about proof - if it’s not written down then it can become lost. How much about the Druids has survived?[/quote]

Some of the history was taken down for sure. But much of it was eaten before we got to talk to those who lost their heads.

No GPS back in those days so if you got lost and ended up on the wrong hillside… well, you got a good welcome. Skulls are still stacked up in our local Kuba where the war festival dances are still performed every year.