A Whiskey Recommendation


#61

Second Morangie for a beginner. Light and delicate but very very nice. Standard Morangie is a 10-year-old, not 12.


#62

Second Morangie for a beginner. Light and delicate but very very nice. Standard Morangie is a 10-year-old, not 12.[/quote]
Pre-beginner Scotch drinker here!

I think I’m old enough now to move on from drinks with umbrellas in them to big man drinks. Just a whiff of them makes me want to vomit (like taking a whiff of irishstu =P), but ALL the cool people drink Scotch and whisky and liquors in fancy bottles, no?

So you think Glenmorangie 12 yrs is a good one to start for a newbie, eh? Ice or no? Mixed or no? I am clueless about big man drinks. Please advise.

Why are they all Glen something? Glenfidditch, Glenlivet, Glenmorangie…?


#63

914,

A big, yet sophisticated guy like you ought to be able to enjoy a real man’s drink:

[quote]Have you ever wondered what makes Rebel Yell such a great tasting bourbon whiskey? In addition to selecting the choicest ingredients, using pure limestone-filtered water and patiently aging our whiskey in new charred white oak barrels, Rebel Yell is one of only a few wheated bourbons on the market today. Being a wheated bourbon means that Rebel Yell uses wheat, rather than rye in the mashbill. Wheat makes for a much softer, smoother spirit than rye, and when you work it into the mashbill of a bourbon, it produces a notably softer, smoother whiskey. In fact, Rebel Yell has been made according to the same time-honored recipe since 1849. So now you know!

Nose: Honey, butter, raisins

Mouth: A big, round body with a palette that directly follows the nose – honey, butter and just a hint of dark fruit (plums, raisins). The finish is long, warm and interesting in that a touch of spiciness, not present in the palette comes into play.

Overall: This is a good bourbon with a definite style. Drink it from a shot glass or maybe even a snifter, but best over ice with no water, no club soda. Nothing. Rebel Yell Bourbon is well-balanced and shouldn’t be tampered with unless you wish to make a very good Manhattan.[/quote]


#64

[quote=“Tigerman”]914,

A big, yet sophisticated guy like you ought to be able to enjoy a real man’s drink:

[quote]Have you ever wondered what makes Rebel Yell such a great tasting bourbon whiskey? In addition to selecting the choicest ingredients, using pure limestone-filtered water and patiently aging our whiskey in new charred white oak barrels, Rebel Yell is one of only a few wheated bourbons on the market today. Being a wheated bourbon means that Rebel Yell uses wheat, rather than rye in the mashbill. Wheat makes for a much softer, smoother spirit than rye, and when you work it into the mashbill of a bourbon, it produces a notably softer, smoother whiskey. In fact, Rebel Yell has been made according to the same time-honored recipe since 1849. So now you know!

Nose: Honey, butter, raisins

Mouth: A big, round body with a palette that directly follows the nose – honey, butter and just a hint of dark fruit (plums, raisins). The finish is long, warm and interesting in that a touch of spiciness, not present in the palette comes into play.

Overall: This is a good bourbon with a definite style. Drink it from a shot glass or maybe even a snifter, but best over ice with no water, no club soda. Nothing. Rebel Yell Bourbon is well-balanced and shouldn’t be tampered with unless you wish to make a very good Manhattan.[/quote][/quote]

A good litmus test as to the political orientation of the drinking establishement from which you are imbibing


#65

They’re the names of the places they come from. A glen is a valley. If you’re drinking quality single malt you don’t need anything in it at all, except a little water to bring out the bouquet.


#66

Naaw…wouldn’t that be the old Bushmills vs Jameson test? :wink:


#67

Naaw…wouldn’t that be the old Bushmills vs Jameson test? :wink:[/quote]

Dunno…I know we were all watching the Dukes of Hazzard on cable yesterday. I’ve found bringing Rebel yell to parties you get a response like the Atlantan’s (Atlanteans?) had to the stars & bars on the General Lee.


#68

Tigerman-Where do you get this Rebel Yell you speak so highly of?
Can you get it in Taiwan?


#69

Vat 69

I bought 5 bottles last summer at Drinks- hell I had half a bottle in me before I left the store.

I drank 3 bottles, then buried the last one in the park across the street from my house in the middle of the night digging the

hole with a claw hammer. I drew a map with an old crayon on the back of a vacuum cleaner bag. I lost the map but have

returned many times to look for it. As a last resort I might have the Chief come out to find it.

Free Scotch and the Chief are kind of like swine and truffles.

You all can bring your lawn chairs and crappy whisky and watch me wrestle the Chief for that last bottle.

I WILL win when properly motivated.

So that’s who took the last drumstick.

Bruddah Iz R.I.P.


#70

[quote=“Bubba 2 Guns”]Vat 69

I bought 5 bottles last summer at Drinks- hell I had half a bottle in me before I left the store.

I drank 3 bottles, then buried the last one in the park across the street from my house in the middle of the night digging the

hole with a claw hammer. I drew a map with an old crayon on the back of a vacuum cleaner bag. I lost the map but have

returned many times to look for it. As a last resort I might have the Chief come out to find it.

Free Scotch and the Chief are kind of like swine and truffles.

You all can bring your lawn chairs and crappy whisky and watch me wrestle the Chief for that last bottle.

I WILL win when properly motivated.

So that’s who took the last drumstick.

Bruddah Iz R.I.P.

[/quote]

:roflmao: Gawd, I forgot about that stuff.

This is amusing
http://www.moderndrunkardmagazine.com/issues/05_02/5_02_rotgutman.html


#71

[quote=“Josefus”]Tigerman-Where do you get this Rebel Yell you speak so highly of?
Can you get it in Taiwan?[/quote]

Can’t get it in Taiwan, to my knowledge. But, the OP isn’t in Taiwan, to my knowledge. Anyway, it used to be available only south of the Mason-Dixon line, when I was a kid. But, it has been available in the northern states for some time now. Dunno if its available in Canada… usually have to inquire at establishments selling spirits… some have it, some will try to get it…

Next time I go back to the States I’ll look for some and bring it back, if yinzer innerested.


#72

Where is this Drinks place? I’d really like to get my hands on some Laphroaig, Knob Creek, Jameson, Bush Mills, Highland Park, Ardbeg, etc. etc. etc., but I haven’t the foggiest idea where to go (just got here about a week ago).

For the love of all that’s holy, point me in the direction of sweet sweet (or smokey, leathery, downright painful) whisk(e)ys.


#73

[quote=“herringbone”]Where is this Drinks place? I’d really like to get my hands on some Laphroaig, Knob Creek, Jameson, Bush Mills, Highland Park, Ardbeg, etc. etc. etc., but I haven’t the foggiest idea where to go (just got here about a week ago).

For the love of all that’s holy, point me in the direction of sweet sweet (or smokey, leathery, downright painful) whisk(e)ys.[/quote]
Don’t know if they have all those you mentioned, but they’re all over Taipei. One up on Sungjiang Rd, one beside the Jingmei MRT station, many others. Their logo is a red barrel on a white background.


#74

Knappogue Castle 1994, an excellent single-malt Irish whiskey. (gated URL, unfortunately; please accept my pre-emptive apology if you find yourself unable to reach this destination)

Now that’s good whiskey (really good).

Happy (if belated) Lá Fhéile Pádraig!


#75

Second Morangie for a beginner. Light and delicate but very very nice. Standard Morangie is a 10-year-old, not 12.[/quote]

Glenmorangie is on sale at Geant now for 599, down from 899.
Great price! :beer:


#76

I looked briefly thru the thread, and I’m really clueless about this.

I like scotch. But scotch is whisky? Is that right? Or is whisky differnt from scotch.

Can some one explain it for me. I just bought some Buchanan’s and it says scotch whisky. Duh, but I always thought there was a difference.

Thanks for understanding my lack of understanding :smiley:


#77

let the wiki help ya:

Scotch whisky is whisky made in Scotland. In the United States, it is often referred to as “Scotch”. In Britain, the term whisky is usually taken to mean Scotch unless otherwise specified.

Scotch whisky is divided into four distinct categories: single malt, vatted malt (also called “pure malt”), blended and single grain.

more here:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotch_whisky


#78

Nama -

Bourbon…Kentucky Bourbon. Yellowstone, Makers Mark, Early Times and many more.

Kentucky Bourbon

Official Website of the Kentucky Bourbon Distillers Association


#79

There are many places where whisky/whiskey is manufactured, and each place has a different flavour culture, if you like. the various major producing countries also have strict labelling and production laws to keep that quality and to guarantee you’ll get what you are paying for, which also keeps their styles and brands quite distinct.

I could write stuff here but that would only start an argument among the purists, so why not have a look at the Interwebs? for a start:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whiskey

Many other countries make local whiskey as well, but they win only on price, usually. Try the lovely Mekong brand in Vietnam and Thailand,if you like. I have had some abysmal stuff in Africa too.


#80

Second Morangie for a beginner. Light and delicate but very very nice. Standard Morangie is a 10-year-old, not 12.[/quote]

Glenmorangie is on sale at Geant now for 599, down from 899.
Great price! :beer:[/quote]

JEEBUS! I’m only noticing this NOW??? Is this sale still on?
Anyone? (Geant is not exactly local for me)