Adopting a Dog

I’ve been thinking of getting a dog, and although the idea of a pet store dog is initially more appealing, I’m thinking that I should check out the local shelters. Only problem is: Where are they? Do they ever have puppies? (If I’m going to adopt a refugee, I’d prefer one that hasn’t learned too many bad habits.) Do the animal shelters offer any services, like microchip implanting or shots?

More importantly, have any of you successfully adopted and raised loving, well-trained dogs in Taiwan? I’d be interested to know your experiences…

Whatever you do, don’t get a pet store dog. For a number of reasons.

  1. The kind of people who run pet stores and the animal breeding in Taiwan, can not be trusted and the fact that there are so many stray and unwanted dogs in Taiwan should be enough to convince us all to try another route.
    I’ve raised a dog since being a puppy in Canada and have attempted to save and find a home for two small abandoned puppies in Taipei before. Puppies are a lot of work… (fun and rewarding work but work nontheless) but if you got the time here’s my suggestion. At the weekend flower market on ChienGuo the SPCA or their Taiwan equivalent is there giving away puppies right next to the guys who are selling pure breds. If you are worried about bad habits… get a puppy. You’ll be able to tell if he’s gonna be a headcase or what. If you can spend the time and have the patience any puppy will turn out fine. If I had the time and the right situation for a dog -which I clearly don’t right now - I would love to get another dog. But I’m confident I could find a perfectly great abandoned puppy (who really needs a home) like the ones I gave away without having to support the pet industry in Taiwan which will just breed another dog to make up for the one you bought. With the money you would spend on a “pure” breed you could easily take a dog in need of a home to a vet and chances are he’ll be a fine and great companion. Besides mutts are way cool.
    That’s my thinking anyway. Good Luck and have fun with your dog.

Don’t buy a pure-bred pet store dog, unless its one of the free stray puppies they occasionally have. (Nice strays can also be found for free at vets.) Inbreeding is very common (and cruel) with pure bred dogs. Lineage certificates are often bogus. Get a stray like I have, and you’re in for a real loyal friend.

We picked up a stray adult pure-bred Chow Chow several years ago. The nice thing about getting an adult was that she was already house trained. She’s pretty stupid so that’s about the only training that’s taken, but she’s sweet. If we hadn’t adopted her, there was a breeder who was ready to give her a “nice home.”

That should give you an idea of breeding quality that’s out there–picking up an unregistered runt (she’s really small for a Chow–about 18 kg) and using her for breeding.

As an aside, if you plan to have kids in the next few years, you should probably avoid Chows.

Is t-aarf still around? Their website is still out there despite crashing last year I think(web search under t-aarf should bring it up). They seem focused on jetting mutts to shelters in the States. Don’t know how organized they are, but maybe you could contact them and give a home to one of the lucky dogs they rescue from the mean streets.

My girlfriend has been window shopping at the pet shop and has decided that she wants a dog. She has really taken a liking to one particular puppy. I’m not sure she is able to take care of a dog, and I certainly don’t have time. Rather than getting a puppy at one of these dodgy pet shops, I suggested adopting a street dog. My girlfriend has some reservations about that, but I think after a bath and a trip to the vet the dog should be fine. Then if things don’t work out and the dog needs to go back to the street, no harm is done. Can anyone advise what assorted vaccinations will be needed at the vet. Are there any other special needs a street dog may have versus a store bought puppy?

www.animalstaiwan.org has lots of dogs up for adoption. They’ve been washed, and as far as I know, vaccinated too. I’m sure Stray Dog can fill you in.

Yes, they are routinely vaccinated, and when old enough, also neutered. The dogs available are always changing – sometimes there is an apparent purebred, and sometimes there are puppies. But there are always some really great dogs that are neither purebred nor puppies, who really need a loving home. All you have to do is contact Stray Dog and go spend some time visiting with the dogs, maybe taking some of them for a walk, and it won’t be long before you fall in love with one of them and want to take it home! :slight_smile:

Another thing that is really great about adopting a dog (or cat) from AnimalsTaiwan, is that they allow you to take the animal for a trial period. If you feel that you and the dog are not a good match, you can return the dog and take another one for a trial period. It is very important to find the right match because a pet will be your responsibility for the rest of its life. It depends on you for love, security, care, companionship and safety.

If you are a foreigner and miss having a loving companion around the house but are unsure when you will return home, fostering a dog is always a wonderful alternative. This way you can have a very positive influence in an animal’s life, take care of it and train it while also helping to prepare it for a permanent home.

If you would like some more information about the animals, and if you would like to meet any of the dogs or cats available for adoption, you can contact Sean (natasha@animalstaiwan.org).

Save a life, adopt a dog now. :slight_smile:

if you want a free puppy we found a litter of 4, 3 males and 1 female. Here is the thread:
forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopic.php?t=54032

We checked on them the past few days and they are adorable, seems like mom is taking good care of them. Let me know if you are interested. However, I think checking out Animals Taiwan first is probably the best way to go.

[quote=“havilina”]Another thing that is really great about adopting a dog (or cat) from AnimalsTaiwan, is that they allow you to take the animal for a trial period. If you feel that you and the dog are not a good match, you can return the dog and take another one for a trial period. It is very important to find the right match because a pet will be your responsibility for the rest of its life. It depends on you for love, security, care, companionship and safety.

If you are a foreigner and miss having a loving companion around the house but are unsure when you will return home, fostering a dog is always a wonderful alternative. This way you can have a very positive influence in an animal’s life, take care of it and train it while also helping to prepare it for a permanent home.

If you would like some more information about the animals, and if you would like to meet any of the dogs or cats available for adoption, you can contact Sean (natasha@animalstaiwan.org).

Save a life, adopt a dog now. :slight_smile:[/quote]

Excellent post!

For anyone in the south of Taiwan, same goes for us here. Contact me if you would like to meet some of our four legged friends. :scooby:

[quote=“ratbrain”]if you want a free puppy we found a litter of 4, 3 males and 1 female. Here is the thread:
forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopic.php?t=54032

We checked on them the past few days and they are adorable, seems like mom is taking good care of them. Let me know if you are interested. However, I think checking out Animals Taiwan first is probably the best way to go.[/quote]This got me thinking… You know, we have many animals we love dearly and we meditate and pray everyday for the right homes to come along. But the pups ratlung posted are on the street. While we need to have support, help and caring homes for the animals we rescue, I think that we can inspire some people to rescue animals on their own, it’s a huge part of the battle against animal suffering. I personally encourage anyone out there to take one off the street as opposed to buying one or adopting one.

This said, if you lack the confidence and experience, many independent animal welfare organisations have animals that are ready to be re-homed. Fostering as mentioned above is a sure way to benefit from the company of a loving animal while gauging your ability to be a caretaker.

thanks ,bobepine, for making me feel less guilty. I know you guys are working hard to find homes for animals, I didn’t want to take anything away from that. I think getting a pet from AT is better for someone that needs to be persuaded away from a pet shop. However, once you take a look at these puppies, i think no persuasion would be necessary!

Absolutely right, however keep in mind that if people are kind enough to take some of the animals off your hands, you are then able to help other dogs suffering on the streets… so regardless, some dogs are going to get saved.