Airlines - Cathay Pacific (CX)

In normal times (ie - not avoiding Russian Airspace) Tokyo to New York / Montreal etc. isn’t much different. Taipei to New York gets even closer to the North Pole. Remember that for the most part, overflying Russia was not on prior to 1990 - as the Koreans found out twice (the lesser known one was a 707 near Murmansk in 1978).

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Yes—but two small points to add here:

Asia to the East Coast of North America is usually ultra-longhaul, while the trips to Europe—still a ways to go!—are simply longhaul.

And: prior to 1990, there were no commercial aircraft capable of travelling such distances nonstop. I still remember taking Cathay Pacific in the early 2000s when the Toronto-HKG route required a pitstop in Anchorage, Alaska—they needed to refuel. What a joy it was when the 777-300ER was deployed as part of CX’s fleet, finally making it possible to travel such distances nonstop.

I still adore that aircraft—despite CX desecrating it by densifying economy with its much-hated 10 across seating!

Guy

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I will fly almost the same on Air Swiss, my co worker will also take this and got her ticket but not sure she can visit the Japan office and go shopping.

Oh, did not two airplanes shot down and all the people gone, so sad. I just know the Korean one near Japan in Russia and the Malaysian one which was not Russia.

The other Korean one was KAL902 from Paris to Seoul via Anchorage. Navigation errors put them off course and over the Arctic coast of Russia, intercepted and shot at, forced landing on a frozen lake - 2 fatalities.

That error flying to Russia looks bad, looks like the aeroplane turned back to Europe and they did not know it. Only two died, not as bad as I thought.

I suppose we should also note, given the topic of this thread, that . . .

As of August 2022, Cathay Pacific’s Marco Polo Club is no more; it’s been rebranded (or, in the nonsense corporate-speak we are subjected to nowadays, “elevated” or “enhanced”) as simply “Cathay.”

Some details about this change are discussed here:

Guy

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Korean Airlines and China Airlines had one fault in common - most of their Cockpit crew had originated from the Military, and still ‘took orders’ from the Captain who was ‘always right’ - until Management figured out that that wasn’t a good idea in Commercial Aviation and recruited from other sources after the crashes of 1994 (Nagoya) and 1998 (Taoyuan) ‘woke them up’. I think they had KLM helping them to sort out the Cockpit procedures too.

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Blame Emirates for that as they started the 10 across and most others followed as Aircraft went through major maintenance checks.

Mind you, Cathay committed a greater sin - when they bought new Economy seats that when you ‘reclined’ them, the seat cushion slid forward, pushing knees against the seat in front, effectively reducing legroom. The only good thing is that the one in front didn’t recline into your face - the cushions moved, the seat back didn’t. Those seats didn’t last long, too many complaints forced them to replace with ‘normal’ seats.

Ah, the notorious yet short-lived “shell” seats! I seem to be one of the few people who didn’t mind them all that much. In hindsight, they seem glorious compared to the current pack-'em-in configurations in economy we’re subjected to nowadays.

Guy

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Correct me if I have missed it, but the “NEW” Cathay doesn’t seem to allow you to use points to book hotel rooms!!!

There is apparently all sorts of trouble now with their website as they “enhance” our experience as newly minted “Cathay” members.

Have you attempted to simply go through the Asia Miles website?

Guy

Some flights go over the North Pole, shorter to Europe.

’ Is it shorter to fly over the North Pole?

Image result for flights go over the North Pole, shorter to Europe

It’s surprisingly faster (by around two hours), and a smoother flight than heading out over the ocean—with the bonus of a rare peek at the high Arctic’

Well no, went in via the Cathay site. But I have now logged on to A-M (same ID!!) and yes Hotel, Car Rental etc. is there.

Maybe I should find something to spend my points on - they expire in January too!!

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The Earth is not flat - though some may beg to differ.

The shortest way from A to B is via the “Great Circle” which is more dramatic the further North or South the start and end points are. Search for “Great Circle Route” and it is explained.

The Earth is not flat - though some may beg to differ.

The shortest way from A to B is via the “Great Circle” which is more dramatic the further North or South the start and end points are. Search for “Great Circle Route” and it is explained.
[/quote]

Not flat as I fly around the world mostly on Cathay Pacific. Flew the early KHH flight , not many people , but a bit slower check in so was bit worried as I arrived 70 minutes before departure but fast security and boarding. At Hong Kong, quiet but the flight to Los Angeles was full and LAX was full of people but still got out in 45 min. Immigration is nice and friendly (I like LAX for this) most of wait was for luggage. Crew was nice and ordered Hindu meal was nice too. Two days meetings then on to England, will see what its like there on Monday. A few meetings there (Monday’s delayed), a week off then Cathy from Europe via HKG back to KHH Airport. LAX has nice new international terminal is nice BTW, but just lots and lots of people.

Hong Kong transfer

LAX Airport is busy

Given Cathay Pacific’s skeletal schedule, it’s amazing you could make this work. When I looked into flights to Vancouver this past summer, it was utterly impossible to arrange.

Guy

Nice schedule into KHH, 2 hour hour transfer in HKG. Out of KHH was 4 hours in Hong Kong Airport, had overpriced starbucks single coffee same price for this in Los Angeles

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Cathay Pacific has had, during the brutal restrictions in HK, a new home: Alice Springs, Australia. Check this out:

Guy

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