Amsoil dealers?

I hear some good things about Amsoil motor oil, but they’re only sold though official Amsoil dealers.

Any of them here in Taiwan?

I believe forum member 808state is/was an agent. I had some PM correspondence with him a while ago about the possibility getting an Amsoil secondary bypass filter kit, but they don’t import those into Taiwan.

Chances are I’d have been too cheapskate to buy one anyway.

I initially sent an email to what I assume is the Taiwan HQ/Importer, (see below) but they didn’t respond, probably because it was in English.

Seber T. Incorporated
11F-3 No.128 Sec 2 Chung Te Road
Taichung, Taiwan R.O.C.
service@lllube.com
886.4.2238.2923
www.lllube.com
Amsoil Oil Filters

LLLube.com

Thanks for the info!

At Far East Auto Parts I see a lot of motor oils from Japan and Germany (or at least with their writing on the labels). Any experience with those?

I ask about Amsoil because I hear Amsoil, Red Line, and Purple Velvet (?) are the only real synthetics out there. Even Mobile 1 is made from petroleum, though highly refined. If it’s true I can change motor oil only once a year yet get better gas mileage, a cooler running engine and reduce wear and tear, the higher price is more than worth it.

[quote=“formosaobama”]Thanks for the info!

At Far East Auto Parts I see a lot of motor oils from Japan and Germany (or at least with their writing on the labels). Any experience with those?
[/quote]

In my view a private individuals experience with oil is unlikely to be of any value. This kind of thing needs lab tribological and used oil analysis for meaningful conclusions to be drawn. Some people are prepared to pay for oil analysis, and their data may be of interest, but I’m not.

If you want anecdotal evidence, sites like “Bob is The Oil Guy” have lots (and some UOA data), but a lot of it is bullshit and it gets tedious very rapidly.

Professional opinion, based on subjective but wide observation, may well be a different matter. IIRC Mr S recommends Agip.

I have an old car which seems to be putting a lot of metal in the oil. It probably needs high levels of Zinc anti-wear compounds to protect the cams, which excludes most recent spec oils, synthetic or mineral. I give it frequent oil changes, which also contra-indicates expensive synthetic long-life oils.

These are special requirements and won’t apply in general, though I suspect the reduction in zinc in current spec oils has a general negative impact on wear protection.

In my view the best buck-bang is likely to be obtained by fitting a simple oil accumulator/preluber (since, anecdotally at least, most wear is believed to occur on dry starts) and by supplementing the crappy OEM oil filtration with bypass and magnetic filtration.

No prizes for guessing why manufacturers dont generally do this.

These changes would complement synthetic long-life oils, and if I ever implement them (unlikely) I’ll look into the latter more closely.

By Purple Velvet, I think you mean Royal Purple (from US).
I will never use that oil again, I tried it twice and it burns much more quickly than other oils I’ve tried, even compared to Mobil 1.

It’s true that Mobil 1 is not a ‘true’ synthetic by North American standards (Group III synthetic) but it has worked well for me in the past.
Also, it seems relatively easy to get Motul in Taiwan which I have used for the 2 years of racing prior to coming to Taiwan. They are also ‘true’ synthetics (Group IV/V synthetics depending which oil you go with).
Before switching to Motul, I used Redline prior to that and would highly recommend it as well if you can find it.

Some Castrol oils out there are like Mobil 1, Group III synthetics, but a very select few are Group IV. One that comes to mind is a 0w30 one. It’s black bottle, with 0w30 in red label and on the back says Made in Germany.

I think the best oil is one that is affordable, easy to obtain while still maintaining good levels of protection.
By changing to a quality oil, it’s already better than some of the manufacturer’s oils you get at dealerships.

Even when I was racing, I never bothered using any oil additives as some are not very good and can actually cause more harm than good.

Other than buying a quality oil, it’s also a good idea to pay attention to your oil change intervals (you can find this out through an oil analysis test, which will also tell you which oils are better at protecting your motor). If your oil is turning into sludge maybe you should try a different oil, change earlier, or one with more detergents.
Also, being in Taiwan and as it gets quite hot here especially during summer and in stop/go traffic I would look at a heavier weight oil.

Oil discussion aside, do not cheap out on the oil filter. It’s as important as the oil itself and use the manufacturer’s oil filter as a minimum as it’s generally fairly decent.

You can also get a magnetic oil drain plug, they’re cheap, I used it on my car but I can only guess that it makes a difference with no empirical evidence just by seeing some of the stuff stuck to the magnet during my oil changes.

Thanks, ducked and MLR! Yes, I meant Royal Purple, which I read has quality control issues.

I just bought a new Yaris, and when I took it in for its first checkup at the dealership, they told me modern engines don’t need to have the first oil and filter replaced until 10,000km. Does that sound right? I understand most people recommend you go with dyno oil during the break in period, so I will wait a bit until switching to synthetic. Yes, I know how many horse power the Yaris engine has, but I want the engine protection and improved gas mileage.

Magnetic drain plugs may be of some limited use (I have one) but a magnetic dipstick makes a lot more sense, so (of course) you can’t, AFAIK, buy one for a car.

You can, however, improvise one with a magnetic pickup tool, which works for at least some cars.

Example here (along with a lot more oil-related argy-bargy)

forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopi … 0#p1346212

[quote=“formosaobama”]Thanks, ducked and MLR! Yes, I meant Royal Purple, which I read has quality control issues.

I just bought a new Yaris, and when I took it in for its first checkup at the dealership, they told me modern engines don’t need to have the first oil and filter replaced until 10,000km. Does that sound right? I understand most people recommend you go with dyno oil during the break in period, so I will wait a bit until switching to synthetic. Yes, I know how many horse power the Yaris engine has, but I want the engine protection and improved gas mileage.[/quote]

I have no evidence for this, but personally, I would not wait that long. My mom bought a new mini cooper a couple years ago and I made her go get an oil change before 5,000km even though the factory said 10,000km for first oil change. What I would do is, before you go in to get your oil change, bag the car. Driving it hard through as many gears as possible throughout the rpm range and making the car hold it in gear while decelerating will ensure the engine is broken in. Of course, be safe about it and don’t do it with traffic/pedestrians around you.

Here’s a link on one the ways to break-in a car:
popularmechanics.com/cars/ho … -a-new-car

It’s true though that with higher quality modern synthetics (even modern dyno oil) you can stretch our your oil changes longer than before. Unfortunately, nobody can tell you when to change your oil. Everything is just a guess and estimation at best, only thing that will accurately tell you when you need to change your oil is through an oil analysis test. Keep in mind though that Taiwan has heat, humidity and lots of stop/go traffic which typically means dirty/sludgy oil more frequently.

if it smells like shit, and looks like tar, that’s a good sign it needs changing.