An odd, hypothetical work situation

I’m sure others have gone through this before, but here it is:

I work for an American company. My job is done remotely, over the Internet on a computer. As such, I could technically reside in Taiwan while working for a U.S. company on the other side of the planet.

If I were to move to Taiwan and live here, would I have to pay taxes to the Taiwanese government, and how? Would I have to report to the Taiwanese government, saying, “I live in Taiwan, I work for a US company, so you should deduct income taxes out of my paychecks?” It seems like a very different situation than, if, say, I were to come to Taiwan as an English teacher and teach in a Taiwanese school. In that English-teacher scenario, I’d be working for a Taiwanese employer.

In my hypothetical scenario here, I’d just be staying at home in an apartment in Taiwan, working over the Internet for a U.S. company thousands of miles away. No Taiwanese employers would be affected, so why would I need a work permit?

If I were to move to Taiwan and continue working in such a manner, would I need an ARC or could I just use my 90-day visa waiver stays and travel abroad every 80-plus days to reenter Taiwan?

I am not sure what the law says but why would you want to go through all the trouble to declare your income to Taiwan’s IRS? You have to pay your income tax to IRS (US), though. This is a bit abrupt, but is your company hiring?

[quote=“PeregrineFalcon”]I’m sure others have gone through this before, but here it is:

I work for an American company. My job is done remotely, over the Internet on a computer. As such, I could technically reside in Taiwan while working for a U.S. company on the other side of the planet.

If I were to move to Taiwan and live here, would I have to pay taxes to the Taiwanese government, and how? Would I have to report to the Taiwanese government, saying, “I live in Taiwan, I work for a US company, so you should deduct income taxes out of my paychecks?” It seems like a very different situation than, if, say, I were to come to Taiwan as an English teacher and teach in a Taiwanese school. In that English-teacher scenario, I’d be working for a Taiwanese employer.

In my hypothetical scenario here, I’d just be staying at home in an apartment in Taiwan, working over the Internet for a U.S. company thousands of miles away. No Taiwanese employers would be affected, so why would I need a work permit?

If I were to move to Taiwan and continue working in such a manner, would I need an ARC or could I just use my 90-day visa waiver stays and travel abroad every 80-plus days to reenter Taiwan?[/quote]

So hypothetically speaking, how would you access your money? If you’re planning to transfer cash to a local bank account, then the local banks might start asking questions like “Who is this from? Why are you getting this transfer?” And I do believe there is a limit to how much you can transfer before you get taxed. Also every time you transfer they will ask for your passport and other ID. You’d still have to pay taxes to the USA. And why would you want to live here? If you like island life, move to an island that’s considered US territory. Things are much simpler that way.

He will have to transfer a lot to attract attention from the local tax unit, assumes they even care. The bank asks for a reason the money is for, but not for tax purpose. They just have to categorize the incoming fund. I think it’s the same worldwide? He can use his ATM card to withdraw cash, and please get 360 from Capital One, it’s free of AMT withdrawals. No need of a local bank account, really. You only need one if you work here for direct deposit.

Going somewhere far and foreign is always enticing. Hawaii and Guam are nice but they are not Taiwan ROC. Plus rent is Hawaii is twice as bad than it is in Taipei.

To answer someone’s question, I’ve never tried it but I think some ATMs can do cash withdrawals for US accounts. If not, I’m not sure how else I could access my money.

Problem are not the taxes, but how to stay here. You could do the out every 3 months thinghie but that gets old. And since you have no record/no ID then they can’t charge taxes and that is why they tend to frown upon longer stays. OTOH, if you set up a subsidiary of such company here, then that would give you an ARC and hence you would pay taxes through such company. If you have ARC, you pay NHI and taxes. NHI is useful. Paying taxes give you rights, too.

Are you married to a Taiwan citizen by any chance? If you are not and have no work visa then you must exit and re-entet this country every 3 months.

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No.

Is there such a thing as a work visa for someone residing in Taiwan but working for a non-Taiwan employer?

I tried that. $5 per withdrawal (bank of hawaii), no fee from the local atms. Citibank at citiatms are free. Capital One 360 is free worldwide, though I have not tried it myself.

There are %s charged too , not just service fee.

Depending on your bank. Bank of Hawaii and Capitol One do not charge currency conversion fee. Citi has good exchange rate, from my personal experience and also another forumosan. Anyway, get a Citi and a Capitol one. My kiwi bank card worked in Malaysia and Japan but not in Taiwan. Bring two of them and make sure you can transfer fund online between the two, just in case.

AFAIK, if your yearly income exceeded about 220,000 USD, you are required to report oversea income, and it will be 20% at least.
Otherwise, Taiwan tax agency doesn’t care.

Questions, if I may ask.

Why not work here? 1. There are a number of English cram schools that have visas to give you. Some over hire and give teachers very hours, and make a deal to stay out of the workers private life. Many of these do people do the “private teaching thing”. But I want to caution you that working on your own is illegal. You tend to be pretty safe working in the home of a trusted person, but still …

My point is, why not work a few hours. You will meet nice people and get a feel for the country you really never can get anyway else. As a previous poster said, the government doesn’t care about small income made outside of Taiwan. (Unlike our big brother in the US where you must tell Uncle Sam all the money you made in the world no matter how small).

Why not study full time? That would be a great option and put you in Taiwan. To learn the language as part of society is something special? I’m in “New immigrant” training classes and it is so nice to get a view of that culture. (But you have to be married to a local first") I also think foreigner students are allowed to take part time jobs with certain permissions. You have to research that further but I’ve seen posts to that regard.

You really don’t need that much money to exist here in Taiwan. You can work 20 to thirty hours a week, have a lot of free time to devote to your job back home and you would not have to worry about sending much money back and forth.

To work as an English teacher is really easy. You need to have a Bachelors Degree from an English Speaking Country like the US, England or Australia in any subject. With that you can work in the “cram schools” where little Johny gets sent off to instead of playing with his friends after school.

If you have a Masters Degree in any subject, you can work for the public school system or even universities. I think for universities you may need it in the subject of teaching, but I’m not sure. I think if there is a need, you can be hired with any Masters Degree.

Tell us what brings you here. Why choose this rock? Point of my rambling talk. With out a job, studies or family this place can be pretty boring and lonely. These activities come with visas!
If you are coming here to spend time with your girlfriend. Trust me… Get a job! Get something to do outside! There are topics and topics about Xiao Jie.

Language studies is labor intensive. If you want to work 20 + hours, and study full time, it can be a challenging undertaking.

The OP only said he wants to keep his US job by working from his apartment at home. He was interested in accessing his money and getting longterm pernission to stay here. My question, why come here? If you want to study, get a visa that way. If you want to work, you can find a job easily enough. Many schools over hire so i’m sure you can make a deal to give some of your hours to a coworker if you don’t want to work that much.

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They complicate matters. Then you have to apply for school and a student visa, or get a job with ARC sponsorship, then negotiate your hours. I did that and I regret it, both times. They were Japan and Austria. Should have just gone with my passport and left after three months. So much wasted time, effort and cash. Still a bit angry at myself.

Well, you can get hired here once you arrive. You may even start working “illegally” with the bigger companies as your your paperwork is processed and finalized. Don’t understand how, but I guess the big firms are friends with the cops.

The thing is, Taiwan is very legalistic about working and permits. All of us knows of someone who was deported for working illegally. Many people were told to stay away from work due to a raid. Taiwan is pretty open. Come. Enjoy. But if you work, and that even includes singing with your guitar in an open mike club or on the street, you are going to need a permit.

I can’t see what one would do here on a long stay except work or take care of ones family. People jump for joy at the end of the vacation season. Many people do the three month thing. Many people do have income from abroad. My neighbor, from a country in Europe has his elderly parents living with him and his Taiwanese wife. They must leave the country every three months. There are no special permits for Children on ARCs to sponsor parents (unless things have changed then please share).

You are very honorable… If you signed a year contract in a country like Japan or Austria, and did not want to come back again, there was nothing stopping you from breaking the contract and paying the penalty. Or even skipp out from under the penalty if you could have gotten away with it. If you want to earn money and can make good friends, you can get invited into people’s homes to do some private instruction. You will be handed a nice little red envelope. Just avoid public teaching at all costs… if you care about staying here that is. You will end up being baned for more than three years if caught working.

Why? He’s got a job from home so he’s not coming to teach for food. This is my personal experience, working remotely or tying down in a cubic hole, it’ll cost you just about the same time and energy. Even adding 5 more hours a week to a full time, remote job sacrifices life quality, a lot. 3 month is a long time to see a foreign country, a visa run is not so bad, especially you can see HK or some other cities. That’s also my personal experience. Visa runs for 10 years is bad, but I don’t think that’s what he is contemplating.

No.

Is there such a thing as a work visa for someone residing in Taiwan but working for a non-Taiwan employer?[/quote]

Again, the closest would be setting up a branch company here. And even then, it’s a stretch as certain amount of profits must be shown.

So, no, there is no work visa allowing you to reside if you are not working for a Taiwan based employer.

Most freelancers here have APRC or JFVC (married to a local, open work rights). You could try visa runs every 3 months but as said again, that will get old soon and may or may not work.