Angelina Jolie's Double Mastectomy

Isn’t there a point where your breasts no-longer belong to you but to the adoring public?

Where is the public outrage?

What’s with America?

How can we as casual posters take possession of this woman’s body?

Whose asking the hard questions?

This tomb raider has entered the sacred mausoleum of my mind with a wrecking ball.

How are we to join the two halves of those triangles?

It’s sick.

Take my balls as the price for immortality.

I am a God!

Follow me.

Cut your nutsacks off mortals!

I guess now will match her skeletic body.

No. She had reconstructive surgery with implants. I think what she did was personal and responsible. If a doctor told you you had an 84% chance of developing testicular cancer, and if you father had died of the same, you might consider the same pre-emptive medicine. What’s the big deal? It’s not an easy choice for an individual to make, but I’m not sure why it needs to be anyone else’s business at all. I guess she went public to encourage other women to get tested and know their options, but if she’d never said anything we’d never have known.

Anyway, were they even completely natural before? I don’t know. Maybe she had implants all along to help enhance the tomb raider look? WHO CARES? If you’re not Brad, it’s just not your business.

Yes.

Sorry I don’t take the posture a women been unconditional victims every time.

I didn’t say she was a victum. I asked why we should care. I agree she’s too thin. But I don’t really care.

Does anyone know what’s the cost for taking the kind of gene test she took?

Oh, I was wondering.

WHO CARES? If you’re not Brad, it’s just not your business.[/quote]

Yeah it’s my business. She’s taken it upon herself to get her tits cut off in the name of preemptive surgery - an ugly new buzzword (thanks again America), and to promote the idea to my wife, daughter, mother, sisters.

It’s worse than Brad’s Channel No. 5 advertisement.

Jesus, people, breast cancer still kills. A lot. Jolie had an 84% chance of getting breast cancer. Her mother died of it. She made a decision. It’s not one most women will be faced with but those who are now have a good roll model. End of story. Charlie are you seriously suggesting this is the start of a trend? That women are now going to rush out and get their breasts removed in imitation?

The press says 1900 pounds, but I find that rather exaggerated. I mean, in the ol country genetic tests are 100 USD up.

dailymail.co.uk/news/article … -Brad.html

[quote]7.How much does BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing cost?
The cost for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing usually ranges from several hundred to several thousand dollars. Insurance policies vary with regard to whether or not the cost of testing is covered. People who are considering BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing may want to find out about their insurance company’s policies regarding genetic tests.
[/quote]

[quote]Testing for BRCA mutations can cost anywhere from a few hundred dollars to a few thousand, depending on whether you are testing for one particular mutation (because a family member had that specific mutation) or examining the whole BRCA 1 and BRCA2 genes. The single-site tests in the lower cost range are options for people with a relative who has already had the wide-ranging genetic tests, which average at roughly $3,000 per gene.

Utah’s Myriad Genetics has a monopoly on BRCA testing, thanks largely to its patents for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The U.S. Supreme Court is currently weighing whether or not those patents should stand, with opponents arguing that companies should not be able to grab exclusive rights to products of the human body. Myriad other biotechnology companies say taking away the ability to patent human genes would hamper research into drugs, vaccines and genetically modified crops.

Insurance companies will usually cover tests for BRCA1 and BRCA2 only if a patient meets very specific criteria. For a woman who has not yet developed breast cancer, she might need to have three close female relatives with breast cancer, two close blood relatives with ovarian cancer or breast cancer at an unusually young age or a male relative with breast cancer. Belonging to a certain ethnic group that has an increased risk for BRCA mutations, like Ashkenazi Jewish, may also bump up a woman’s chances of getting the test covered.

But the average woman probably wouldn’t get coverage for a BRCA test if her situation was the same as Angelina Jolie’s: a single close female relative that died of ovarian cancer after age 40.

“It has got to be a priority to ensure that more women can access gene testing and lifesaving preventive treatment, whatever their means and background, wherever they live,” Jolie wrote in the New York Times.

[/quote]
ibtimes.com/angelina-jolie-m … ot-covered

I bet maybe in Taiwan we get it partially covered by good ol NHI.

Its really brave of her to do this. Im sure it wasnt a decision taken lightly.

Bravo to her.

‘Cut her tits off’? Words such as those do not make you sound like a man who thinks about how his words come across in a public space. There’s being direct, and there’s sounding coarse and mysogynistic. Clue: your intent is not the primary factor involved.

Just wanted to clarify something, this sentence is correct.

I heard a few times in “The Office” and “30 Rock” that people is suppose to say “bravo” to men and “brava” to women, that is incorrect.

Brave translates as Bravo for male gender and Brava for female (or valiente for both).

But “Bravo” as an expression is like “I applause for you” whatever gender.

The press says 1900 pounds, but I find that rather exaggerated. I mean, in the ol country genetic tests are 100 USD up.

dailymail.co.uk/news/article … -Brad.html

[quote]7.How much does BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing cost?
The cost for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing usually ranges from several hundred to several thousand dollars. Insurance policies vary with regard to whether or not the cost of testing is covered. People who are considering BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation testing may want to find out about their insurance company’s policies regarding genetic tests.
[/quote]

[quote]Testing for BRCA mutations can cost anywhere from a few hundred dollars to a few thousand, depending on whether you are testing for one particular mutation (because a family member had that specific mutation) or examining the whole BRCA 1 and BRCA2 genes. The single-site tests in the lower cost range are options for people with a relative who has already had the wide-ranging genetic tests, which average at roughly $3,000 per gene.

Utah’s Myriad Genetics has a monopoly on BRCA testing, thanks largely to its patents for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The U.S. Supreme Court is currently weighing whether or not those patents should stand, with opponents arguing that companies should not be able to grab exclusive rights to products of the human body. Myriad other biotechnology companies say taking away the ability to patent human genes would hamper research into drugs, vaccines and genetically modified crops.

Insurance companies will usually cover tests for BRCA1 and BRCA2 only if a patient meets very specific criteria. For a woman who has not yet developed breast cancer, she might need to have three close female relatives with breast cancer, two close blood relatives with ovarian cancer or breast cancer at an unusually young age or a male relative with breast cancer. Belonging to a certain ethnic group that has an increased risk for BRCA mutations, like Ashkenazi Jewish, may also bump up a woman’s chances of getting the test covered.

But the average woman probably wouldn’t get coverage for a BRCA test if her situation was the same as Angelina Jolie’s: a single close female relative that died of ovarian cancer after age 40.

“It has got to be a priority to ensure that more women can access gene testing and lifesaving preventive treatment, whatever their means and background, wherever they live,” Jolie wrote in the New York Times.

[/quote]
ibtimes.com/angelina-jolie-m … ot-covered

I bet maybe in Taiwan we get it partially covered by good ol NHI.[/quote]

The IP for this test in under review in the US Supreme Court now, it is the test case for human genome IP and extremely important.

The cost of the test or all procedures in US varies according to if you are insured or not. Ironically private insurance companies often pay a lot more for procedures and tests than individuals who are uninsured and pay themselves.

This doesn’t make sense to me but the insurance companies seem willing to pay these inflated prices for some reason.

Just wanted to clarify something, this sentence is correct.

I heard a few times in “The Office” and “30 Rock” that people is suppose to say “bravo” to men and “brava” to women, that is incorrect.

Brave translates as Bravo for male gender and Brava for female (or valiente for both).

But “Bravo” as an expression is like “I applause for you” whatever gender.

[/quote]

its good to know !

p.s. i think Jolie is rich enough to afford the test.

I think it must be a ghastly decision for a woman to make, especially one in the entertainment field that is known the world over, such as Jolie.

Its a monumental decision for her. I am sure it was not made lightly.

Its been all over the tv news here.

The thing was she was facing an over 90pct probability of getting breast cancer and dying from it.

She had no choice. She did it for her children she said, so she can be around to watch them grow and be around for them.

She had her ovaries removed too.

Very tough decision especially for one in her shoes. But its her only sane one.

So once again i applaud her for making this courageous move.

And being an example to others who may be on the fence.

You simply HAVE to do what you HAVE to do !

No. She didn’t. The tests are not good enough to predict probabilities (for a particular individual) within 1%. That would be an astounding technological achievement. Even in the physical sciences, it’s not usually possible to get numbers that crisp and clean. In the murky world of medicine, the best you could really offer is “much higher than usual”.

They might. People do odd things when they’re in fear for their lives. We can’t argue about whether she made the right decision or not - the decision was hers and hers alone. What does matter is that other people understand the science behind these tests so that they can make informed decisions about having major surgery (which itself is not without risks) when there is nothing actually wrong with them. Medical technology is getting terribly complex, and most people don’t have a clue how it all works. Often, they trust men in white coats to tell them what to do: men with their own prejudices, misunderstandings, misplaced loyalties, and (sometimes) a who-gives-a-shit attitude. If a celebrity appears on TV telling the hoi polloi that radical surgery on the basis of a somewhat-dodgy test is a Good Thing, it’s not a good thing.

But she didn’t just decide to lop off a few lady parts because she’s too rich and bored and has nothing better to do. She followed a doctor’s advice. And let me tell you, as a woman, that would be a huge, huge thing to decide to do. I am NO MORE LIKELY to go an have my knockers removed than before I heard that she did it. Come on. You guys are being very unfair.

I don’t know anything in the world about Angelina Jolie’s boobs. Until this news bit, I’d never even thought of them. I don’t care about them. But Angelina and I are both women.

As a woman I can tell you that most of us have a kind of love/hate relationship with our breasts for our entire lives. Before we get them, we worry that we won’t, or that they won’t be “big enough.” When we get them, we feel embarrassed or shy, or shocked that they hurt and ache sometimes. We feel uncomfortable in supportive bras, and frustrated that they change the kind of fashions we can wear. We get a little older and they get us all kinds of attention, or they get us teased because they’re too small, too pointy, too round, or whatever.

Some of us have men fall in love with them or worship them. Our breasts are where you like to snuggle and sleep. Our breasts are where we hold our babies and grand babies, and many times, how we keep them alive. While we feed out new babies, we can feel that the milk flowing from our bodies causes contractions that help everything return to “normal.” We get overwhelmed because milk goes EVERYWHERE and our boobs are huge and they can hurt like the dickens when we’re pregnant and nursing. Then they start to sag a bit, or have stretch marks after nursing and your assurances that you still love them helps us to feel beautiful and to bond with you more.

All this to say that breasts are NOT something women take for granted, and removing them is not something that I believe ANY woman would take lightly. No matter what any celebrity has done to hers.

It’s just not right.

People are living with disease the world over daily. We come, we live, we die. Think of old people sacrificing their lives for their communities.

From wikipedia:
Senicide by culture

[quote]Heruli
The Heruli were a Germanic tribe during the Migration Period (about 400 to 800 CE). Procopius states in his work The Wars, that the Heruli placed the sick and elderly on a tall stack of wood and stabbed them to death before setting the pyre alight.
India
Senicide is currently practiced in Tamil Nadu, a state of India. The traditional practice of senicide by the family members is called Thalaikoothal. In this custom, the elderly person is given an extensive oil-bath early in the morning and subsequently made to drink glasses of tender coconut water which results in renal failure, high fever, fits, and death within a day or two.[11][12] In 2010, after an expose in Virudhunagar district, the administration set up teams of officers to monitor the senior citizens.[13]
Inuit
A common belief is that the Inuit would leave their elderly on the ice to die.[14] Senicide among the Inuit people was rare, except during famines. The last known case of an Inuit senicide was in 1939.[15][16][17]
Japan
Ubasute (姥捨, abandoning an old woman), a custom allegedly performed in Japan in the distant past, whereby an infirm or elderly relative was carried to a mountain, or some other remote, desolate place, and left there to die. This custom has been vividly depicted in the The Ballad of Narayama (a 1956 novel by Shichirō Fukazawa, a 1958 film, and a 1983 film).[/quote]

Please convince me that it is right. Can medicine really predict you have an 84% chance of breast cancer and 50% chance of ovarian cancer. I doubt it. 84% chance is close to 100%. If that were well known then certain people couldn’t get insurance against breast cancer.

Well if I was told id have a 85 pct chance of dying if i kept my dong, id get rid of the dong (and i dont mean spend it in vietnam).

But id get a second and third and fourth opinion first.