Another cannabis arrest!


#81

Only foreigners have marijuana factories consisting of one plant.

This local guy grew for his own use:

Of course we all know that pot is an evil scourge imported by foreigners.

Taiwanese people don’t grow, sell, nor consume weed.


#82

“…was fortunate that the operation was stopped in time, otherwise it is difficult to imagine the harm it could have caused to public safety.”

I do find it fascinating how there is such a concern for public safety here, yet when I walk to just about any intersection in Taipei, I see people running red lights, ignoring basic traffic and safety rules that and up causing accidents yet there is not a cop in sight. They complain about the high cost of the healthcare system and that it’s not sustainable and they need to reduce costs all. Yet, here’s a simple solution that can help. All they need to do is start handing out tickets for every @$hole who runs a red light and you’ll see a significant drop in accidents and healthcare costs. That’s good for “public safety”.


#83

“…was fortunate that the operation was stopped in time, otherwise it is difficult to imagine the harm it could have caused to public safety.”

lol

It is difficult to imagine, they got that right


#84

The food tainting and poisoning, the water wastes, the rotten food relabeled, the extreme pollution in the air, the broken scooters leaving white clouds behind… all those things on the other hand are not harming at all and there’s no rush for putting an end to them.


#85

Have you ever seen a police officer hand out a ticket for speeding or running a red light? I haven’t been here all that long, but I haven’t seen it happen yet. Why is this?


#86

I actually have seen it happen. A few months ago I was wandering around some part of San Chong and in an alley I saw a scooter cop ticketing someone. It was very weird. It is mystifying though. Cars that are legally parked get to pay a parking fee, yet if they park illegally (blocking fire hydrants, crosswalks, sidewalks, etc etc) they pay nothing (most of the time). I have, on a few occassions, seen cars hauled off.


#87

I bike the streets a lot and I’ve seen it many times. But I’ve also seen a scooter driver duck under a traffic cops outstretched arm when he was trying to stop traffic.
Come to think of it, they usually pull over scooters, not cars. I wonder if they’re easier to catch.


#88

I’ve only seen cars get pulled over in the highway. But the only people I see get pulled over on regular streets are people on scooters.


#89

How did this thread go from another cannabis arrest to driving violations?
You guys need to stop smoking too much weed!


#90

And why would you move from the US to Taiwan to work in a chicken shop


#91

Fixed!


#92

Hm well I suppose he is surrounded by hot chicks all day


#93

Handing out tickets can be very dangerous for cops in Taiwan.


#94

It can be dangerous anywhere. But, that’s no excuse to ignore the kind of violations that are happening all the time here. In broad daylight for everyone to see.


#95

No, of course not. Charlie_Phillips was clearly using an extreme example with a degree of flippancy. We all know that the reason Taiwanese cops don’t enforce traffic regulations is because they simply can’t be arsed.


#96

Because they have no college degree, not any other degree/license valid in Taiwan. Hence, finding a job as a local is difficult.


#97

Did his 59 year old girlfriend get her face on TV/web like he did?


#98

marijuana narcotics factory. That takes the cake. One plant and 4 grams. Police promotion!


#99

Chewing binglang causes oral cancer and yet it’s legal. The cultivation of betelnut also damages mountainsides.


#100

Not to mention how the marketing/promotion of binglang reinforces sexist stereotypes of a bygone era and the subjugation of women…my goodness, I think a gender/post-colonial studies graduate has hijacked Chewy`s account!!!:joy::joy::joy::joy: