APRC Application Procedures (Official Checklist)

I would look at page one of this thread. It is updated and current. That will get you started. Then I would go to your local office to verify that you are eligible prior to collecting all the documentation.

I saw in a previous thread back in 2008 about the subject of “breaks” and that people were having APRCs approved even though they had taken a break between ARCs, due to the fact they had been living legally on an ARC for 5 consecutive years, and had been in TW for 183+ days each year.

I got excited because I will soon fill that criteria. Here’s my history.

March 2008 -> July 2010 ARC and 183+ days per year in tw for this period.
May 2011->now. ARC and +183 days (well…not 183 days in 2012 yet but July 2nd it will be)

So there’s quite a large break there, but it’s 5 consecutive years that I’ve had an ARC, 2008,2009,2010,2011, 2012, and each of those years I’ve been in TW 183 days or more.

I called “information for foreigners” (it’s 9pm, other lines are closed) and they said “no breaks” which is contrary to what I’ve seen. I checked page 1 of this thread and the law still seems to suggest breaks are permitable. I have to say though that I couldn’t find the stamina to trawl through nearly 80 pages to learn more.

I assume that my best bet is to call the Taipei APRC agent come July and ask him/her if I qualify, but if anyone can help shed some light in the meantime it would be great. As the break is quite recent, I’m facing another 4 year wait if I can’t get it this year. :s

Thanks to the Northcoast Surfer, I got over my paperwork phobia and I finally got my APRC.
That wasn’t so hard, it just required a lot of patience and that’s it.

[quote=“hbldom”]I saw in a previous thread back in 2008 about the subject of “breaks” and that people were having APRCs approved even though they had taken a break between ARCs, due to the fact they had been living legally on an ARC for 5 consecutive years, and had been in TW for 183+ days each year.

I got excited because I will soon fill that criteria. Here’s my history.

March 2008 -> July 2010 ARC and 183+ days per year in tw for this period.
May 2011->now. ARC and +183 days (well…not 183 days in 2012 yet but July 2nd it will be)

So there’s quite a large break there, but it’s 5 consecutive years that I’ve had an ARC, 2008,2009,2010,2011, 2012, and each of those years I’ve been in TW 183 days or more.[/quote]

You cannot have any break in your residency status, not just in physically being in Taiwan. As long as you held your resident visa in the interim between July 2010 and May 2011, then you’d qualify. However, if you had to re-apply for a resident visa in May 2011, then yes, you have had a break in residency and won’t qualify for an APRC until May 2016 (provided you got your resident visa at that time).

I had a break in my residency status of only a few weeks in July 2010, but I had already had a resident visa since September 2001 without any breaks up to that point so I fit into the two-year window of being able to apply. You can have the break as long as you have already gotten your five years in before the break happened and you apply before the two-year window after meeting the requirements closes.

Hi APRC holders,

Is there 183 days restriction mentioned on the back of your APRC? Please let me know.

Thank you

[quote=“dicernthetruth”]Hi APRC holders,

Is there 183 days restriction mentioned on the back of your APRC? Please let me know.

Thank you[/quote]
[forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopic.ph … 7#p1432267](APRC - Plum Blossom Card

[quote=“jimipresley”][quote=“dicernthetruth”]Hi APRC holders,

Is there 183 days restriction mentioned on the back of your APRC? Please let me know.

Thank you[/quote]
[forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopic.ph … 7#p1432267](APRC - Plum Blossom Card

Thanks Jimipresley.

Not yet time for the whole write up but just so much as I got my APRC today now too… :slight_smile:

More to come with all details but so far thanks to everybody for the help… made it a breeze…

Congratulations and welcome to the club. :sunglasses:

I have a couple of questions actually:

First: I read that I need to translate my US address into Chinese but the street name is not common. It is Shiawassee(shy-ah-wah-see). I had a couple of friends try to transliterate it. They suggested 夏厄沃西, and 士雅瓦色.

Second: In reading the instructions for mailing all 14 documents, it says that you need to submit: 2 copies of the cover letter,two copies of TECRO’S application form for authentication, one copy plus original FBI background check, two copies of Chinese translation of my FBI background check, Two copies of passport information page, Two copies of ARC. Why do you need two of everything, especially the cover letter? I’m wondering if this is a typo or perhaps I just missed the point. Just want to make sure I do it precisely the right way. Really want to avoid any mistakes.

Thanks for any help you guys can provide,

Jason

Because the TECRO in DC requires 2 copies of everything.

[color=#FF0000]TECRO’S Document Authentication Service[/color]

[quote=“TECRO Website”]Requirements for Document Legalization/Authentication

  1. To request these services, you must submit a completed application form for document authentication or a letter on company letter head stating (1) the nature of the document, (2) the purpose for its authentication, (3) the names and addresses of organizations or individuals requesting the authentication, (4) the name of a contact person and his or her phone and fax numbers, (5) and a copy of the applicant’s photo I.D. (e.g., drivers license, passport, or naturalization certificate.)

  2. All documents (except diplomas, individual licenses) to be authenticated must be certified by the Secretaries of States within our service area (which includes Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington, D.C.).

  3. We do accept documents that have been submitted to us via an agent but only if the documents are accompanied by (1) a notarized power of attorney prepared by the applicant and authorizing the agent, and (2) a photo I.D. (e.g., driver’s license, passport, or naturalization certificate) of the person delivering the documents.

  4. The authentication fee is $15 per authenticated document. Payment accepts cash, money order or cashier’s check only (no personal checks or credit cards).

  5. [color=#FF0000]All documents must be submitted with an additional photocopy of the documents in their entirety. This includes an additional photocopy of any cover letter from a local government or the Department of State. If several identical documents are submitted for authentication, we require only one photocopy of one of the documents. [/color]

  6. Applications submitted by mail must also include a self-addressed stamped envelope. We also accept applications delivered via DHL, FedEx, UPS with an air bill form and account number.

  7. The processing of all documents usually takes 2-3 working days.

The Consular Division is open Monday through Friday (9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) and closed on U.S. federal holidays, Chinese Lunar New Year’s Day and October 10th.[/quote]

Because the TECRO in DC requires 2 copies of everything.

[color=#FF0000]All documents must be submitted with an additional photocopy of the documents in their entirety. This includes an additional photocopy of any cover letter from a local government or the Department of State. If several identical documents are submitted for authentication, we require only one photocopy of one of the documents. [/color]

[/quote]

Thanks for the quick response. I read several pages through the topic, but missed that section. My head has been throbbing working on this and my thesis at the same time.

Any advice on the Chinese translation?

None of my clients’ translations have ever been rejected after being translated by this company.

None of my clients’ translations have ever been rejected after being translated by this company.

[/quote]

Thanks Northcoast. I just did some Googling using the transliterations from my friends and found that one of them gave me hits back in English with the correct translation. Should have done that first. Feel scatterbrained.

[quote=“henryhu”]Just got an email from TECRO in the States, and they have a new regulation regarding the translation of the FBI background check. They wrote:

[color=#BF0000]As for the authentication of the Chinese translation version, according to the new regulation, you have to be in our office to sign your name or have the translation to be notarized by the notary public in our service area (Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, West Virgina or Washington DC). Since you are in Taiwan, it’s not possible for our office to authenticate the Chinese version. please have it done in notary public in Taiwan. [/color]

Best,
Consular Division
TECRO

[/quote]

Any solution on this? Do we need to get the translation notarized before sending it to TECRO? I contacted the Foreigner Information hotline and they said I should go to the court to get it notarized if I need.

I just got a call from the TECRO in DC last night regarding the authentication of my documents. Apparently, they no longer authenticate the Chinese translations. They have to be authenticated locally by a Chinese notary public or court of law.

So this means that the Chinese translation doesn’t need to be sent to TECRO, or that it still needs to be but needs to be notarized first? :eh:
If they don’t authenticate the Chinese translation then that means we send 45 instead of the 75 USD?

Wow! That really sucks ass! :doh: So, are you going to make it on time for your application? I know that you were running late and getting close to your cut off date for sliding in under the 2 years eligibility requirement as it pertains to your situation. Wasn’t your two-year window somewhere around July 1st 2012?

Stupid TECRO in DC of course hasn’t updated their web page with the pertinent information regarding this new requirement.

差 不 多
(chàbùduō) - Taiwan at its finest…as usual! :fume:

Well…I would
[color=#FF0000]ASS U ME[/color]
, that now the following would be the correct procedures regarding the FBI background check.

  1. Send the original FBI background check to the TECRO in DC to authenticate it. This document orginates from within the US, so it must be authenticated at the TECRO in DC and can’t be authenticated here in Taiwan.

  2. Translate the FBI background check here in Taiwan. Either do it yourself or have it translated by a reputable translation company. I’m guessing that it will probably have to be a reputable translation company because I doubt that a public notary or a district court would be willing to authenticate an English translation which they can’t read themselves and which has been translated by the applicant. Too much room for “creative” translation! If it has been translated by a translation company with all the required “chops”, then it will be a breeze to get it notorized. Many of my clients have used Megatrans to translate documents from English to Chinese and then Megatrans also had the document notorized for them as well. Kind of a one-stop shopping center.

  3. Submit the authenticated original and the notorized Chinese translation with your APRC package.

I wouldn’t ASS U ME it’s only $45 for just the English FBI background check since they haven’t updated their website with any recent information. I would call the TECRO right now and ask them how much it costs to authenticate the FBI background check by itself and also how much express mailing costs are today.

Personally I think you should get a T-Shirt made with your expression, I quite like it.

“I wouldn’t ASS U ME”

If you do, be sure to put up some links of it.

I sent an email to TECRO’s D.C. office. I am hoping they can give a very concise answer in terms of how the new changes affect us and how to get through the procedure while retaining a grain of sanity.

Something I noticed today though was in my passport I have re-entry permits for 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009, but nothing after that. Is this something I need to get before sending my copies of my passport in?