APRC - Whats going on? The Law is Changing from 7 to 5 Years

As the subject would suggest.

It can be so confusing, Im trying to apply for an APRC but I get told a million different things.

First I was told by a government official that if your a teacher you cant apply, and at the same time I was pulled aside by another
government official and was told thats not true at all.

Now I’ve been here over 7 years but I’ve only worked for 5 years (Student for the first 2) I stated my case to the Taiwanese Immigration Hot-line on 0800-024-111 which were really helpful telling me I have a pretty good chance for applying for an APRC. But to my shock when I arrived to the immigration services, they told me there has been no law change from 7 to 5 years. You can not apply! Thank-You very much and have a nice day.

Can anyone shed some light on the situation, I’ve got less than 20 days before my ARC expires with no extension based on my employer closing down and moving to Dubai.

P.S

I don’t want another employer for the time being as I’ve decided to go home for a few months.

Any help would be grand

[quote=“Gonaddz”]As the subject would suggest.

It can be so confusing, I’m trying to apply for an APRC but I get told a million different things.

First I was told by a government official that if your a teacher you cant apply, and at the same time I was pulled aside by another
government official and was told thats not true at all.

Now I’ve been here over 7 years but I’ve only worked for 5 years (Student for the first 2) I stated my case to the Taiwanese Immigration Hot-line on 0800-024-111 which were really helpful telling me I have a pretty good chance for applying for an APRC. But to my shock when I arrived to the immigration services, they told me there has been no law change from 7 to 5 years. You can not apply! Thank-You very much and have a nice day.

Can anyone shed some light on the situation, I’ve got less than 20 days before my ARC expires with no extension based on my employer closing down and moving to Dubai.

P.S

I don’t want another employer for the time being as I’ve decided to go home for a few months.

Any help would be grand[/quote]

The law has been amended from 7 to 5 years but the amendment has not yet come into force and there is no certainty as to when it will – so at present the legal requirement continues to be 7 years. (See my slightly more detailed response on this topic in a recent thread on the Visa and Residence forum.) I suggest you read through all past threads relating to APRC application requirements on that forum carefully as there is a certain amount of gray area that I couldn’t possibly explain in detail here. If you’re really serious about wanting the APRC, I’d research this very carefully before letting your ARC expire without having a new one in hand. (The requirement of the period of “continuous residence with an ARC” – 7 years now, hopefully to be effectively reduced to 5 years in the near future – is the key to getting the APRC – If I were you I would not let any break occur in this period until I was absolutely sure that I had already met that requirement.) Just my 2 cents. Best of luck.

Interesting - because here in Taichung, I was told LAST year that I could apply for an APRC (I had been here for five years at that time) and the only reason I haven’t yet is because my ARC doesn’t expire until September 2009. I will apply for the APRC by then - then again, I will have been here for seven years by that point, so it won’t matter to me either way.

I am hoping against all hope that the government will lift the racist requirement that I give up my US citizenship to become a citizen of Taiwan, but I seriously doubt the KMT would ever do anything like that.

I don’t think that constitutes as racism. You could at best call it anti Americanism, but they don’t just block U.S. citizens, but in fact all foreign citizens as far as I know. The R.O.C. insists that foreigners give up their native identity to take on an R.O.C. identity. It is for that reason that most people of course fail to take them up on the offer as a Taiwan passport is not at all useful when traveling and the benefits of being Taiwanese do not often outweigh those of being from a more recognized country with better international ties. Besides an A.R.C. often suffices for most foreigners residing here, with few drawbacks aside from being easier for the authorities to kick out, and having to re apply for driving licenses before their time is up. As most people understand already, Taiwanese can hold two passports, not strictly legally, but they aren’t required to give up their nationality by most foreign countries as I suppose technically speaking they don’t have one. If they were asked to give up their nationality China would probably start stomping their feet again like a teenage girl who’s ice cream has just been knocked off its cone.

We all know by now that Taiwan doesn’t want foreigners on the island for fear of having to alter their marvelous government system and perfect infrastructure as well as the damage we would undoubtedly cause to the culture here that has taken thousands of years to develop and perfect.
As some people have put it already if foreigners don’t like the environment, politics or culture in Taiwan they should not complain, but instead go home. I think this is sound advice and so I see no reason why the government should need to change their present policies. I wouldn’t want to spoil things for them.

Are you married to a Taiwan spouse? (The continuous residency requirement to qualify for the APRC is currently 5 years for those married to a local spouse, but 7 years for those who are not.)

I too would like to see the government lift its double standard on dual nationality.

Does my spouse qualify me for an APRC? She’s a Taiwanese citizen by virtue of a previous marriage to a Taiwanese guy. Originally from Hong Kong.

If she is a Taiwanese citizen, she can qualify you for a JFRV (joining family resident’s visa). This means that rather than being based on employment, your ARC is based on your marriage to a Taiwanese citizen. Marriage license, household registry, a few other details and documents, off to the NIA and you’re done in about 15 minutes.

The only way she can qualify you for Permanent Residence is if you have had an ARC based on marriage for 5 consecutive years.

Good luck!

Just to bring this thread up to date: The amendment lowering the APRC qualifying period from 7 to 5 years has now come into force as of 1 August 2008, under an Executive Yuan Order dated 22 July 2008. (I’ve also posted this information on the Visa and Residency forum).