APRC: Worth it?


#1

Simply, thinking about doing it but not sure it’s worth the hassle. Has it really gotten easier? Any recent experiences?


#2

1,000% Easier! But I came here under the old time when the boss owned whitey and pushed me around and threatened me. I came here when there was no such thing and a family visa meant you could stay in Taiwan but not work. Boss gave me a choice, then of course luck would have it the work permits were liberalized. (He sat me down and told me… You can have my visa and work or have your wife’s visa and not.) I had each new visa option as it came out and it helped leverage my position with my boss because at the time, I lived in the middle of know where and didn’t really want to commute to the city…

But, now… lets see. I don’t have to renew my driver’s lic. etc when ever my ARC expires. That was a hassle because even though it normally last for a long term, our licesnses would only last as long as the ARC and you’d have to renew them, and pay the renewal fee. For the most part, I don’t have to worry about stuff that gave me headaches a while ago. I don’t even think I need my wife anymore to maintain my work rights.

Here is one problem that has plagued foreigners in the past, if something happens to your wife, and you are on a visa based on family, you will still be ordered to leave the country. Children are not anchors here and children as far as a know can’t sponsor parents. Maybe things have changed.

My question is this… Does an APRC based on conditions other than marriage come with the same “open” work permit that I currently enjoy? 2. What other ways can a foreigner an APRC other than marriage. I’m ignorant of that. If my status marriage status changes, do my work rights change?

To the OP, I’d go for it… It’s a privilege and it really doesn’t cost that much.


#3

You missed a couple of zeros there.

The laws changed radically at the end of last year. For the better. Most of the previous hoop-de-loop bureaucracy has been eliminated. NOTE: Their website hasn’t been updated with the new requirements. Just stop by and get a photocopy of the new requirements from them. Have a chat with them while you are there. Lord knows you are making this commitment. The people in the ARC renewal department have always been great to me but the people in the APRC are a whole 'nother level of goodness. :bravo:

If you have been in Taiwan for at least 183 days per year for 5 consecutive years you can file as an individual (you don’t have to “use” your wife to file even if you are married).

The permanent work permit is applied for separately after you receive your APRC. Again, an individual can get it not just married ones.

Yes. Go get it. No hassle anymore (either to get it or to renew a standard ARC). This info is related to US citizens. I don’t know how it is for other countries.


#4

There are whole threads on this.

It’s now ridiculously simple, and reasonable value for money. As mentioned, you have to apply for the open work permit separately but this takes another couple of hours at most.

For anyone who meets the requirements (there is a modest minimum-salary limit as well as the 5-year thing mentioned above) I can’t think of any good reason not to apply.


#5

[quote=“finley”]There are whole threads on this.

It’s now ridiculously simple, and reasonable value for money. As mentioned, you have to apply for the open work permit separately but this takes another couple of hours at most.

For anyone who meets the requirements (there is a modest minimum-salary limit as well as the 5-year thing mentioned above) I can’t think of any good reason not to apply.[/quote]

Agreed. BTW it is NT$10,000.

Also, I have hit my head against the wall trying to get a shortlist 1 post continuously updated visa info thread for so long I don’t even flinch when someone else can’t be bothered wading through threads that started when I was still in short “pants”. :laughing:


#6

Yes, Open Work Permit, married or not, is the same. Freedom is freedom. Actually, being married is irrelevant once you have the APRC… for work issues I mean!

They made it so easy that now they have a backlog of thousands of applications. So after approval expect three weeks for them to have time to actually print your card. Aside from that, the process is transparent and smooth as silk.


#7

[quote=“finley”]There are whole threads on this.

It’s now ridiculously simple, and reasonable value for money. As mentioned, you have to apply for the open work permit separately but this takes another couple of hours at most.

For anyone who meets the requirements (there is a modest minimum-salary limit as well as the 5-year thing mentioned above) I can’t think of any good reason not to apply.[/quote]

Is it only “minimum salary” limit or income limit or could it include other types of income from outside Taiwan?

For example, someone that has plenty of income, wants to live in Taiwan, but has no need or desire to work.


#8

IIRC: either ROC taxable income (~600K/year?), property (quite a lot), or savings (a hell of lot). Not sure what the actual numbers are off the top of my head - you’d have to call the immigration people to get the latest.


#9

This is just something you do if you qualify. I had a friend that qualified for an APRC but put off the application and then he didn’t get his contract renewed. He literally had to take the first job in some remote shithole and he immediately got started on his APRC application.

I’m not sure it’s worth it if you have a JFRV allowing you an open work permit but others do. It can be a bit of a hassle if you were physically outside of Taiwan for a certain duration (3 months). A different friend was traveling and had to get a background check from his home country even though he didn’t go home in that time.


#10

I know there is a thread on APRC in Visa&Residency but it is 103 pages long. Is there a more concise and up to date place to go to figure this out? From what everyone has been saying it has encouraged me to apply for a APRC.
Now I just need to know the procedure and how to get documents needed.

Are there any US residents here that have filed for APRC? I’m hoping for some advice on how to obtain documents.


#11

[quote=“calitotaiwan”]
Are there any US residents here that have filed for APRC? I’m hoping for some advice on how to obtain documents.[/quote]
I’m American and applied for/received my APRC in June of this year. PM me with any questions about the process.


#12

[quote=“calitotaiwan”]I know there is a thread on APRC in Visa&Residency but it is 103 pages long. Is there a more concise and up to date place to go to figure this out? From what everyone has been saying it has encouraged me to apply for a APRC.
Now I just need to know the procedure and how to get documents needed.

Are there any US residents here that have filed for APRC? I’m hoping for some advice on how to obtain documents.[/quote]

Calito, if you can do it -you fulfill the time/income requisites- then do it. You won’t regret it and it not a big hassle. Just follow the basic steps:

  1. Go to the nearest NIA office. Ask for the latest form detailing the procedures. [color=#FF0000]Have them check your length of stay, to verify you qualify time-wise.[/color] If all is kosher, proceed with the paperwork collection.
  2. Apply for the paperwork from abroad first, if so required, as it takes longer, but be careful, as it has an expiration date. Most probably, you won’t have to bring anything from abroad, but anyways…
  3. Get local certificates, like tax forms and police record, etc. Fill out form. Take right size pictures. Go back to NIA.
  4. Pay when they ask you to. Come collect your new card when ready. That’s it.

#13

I’ve renewed my ARC five times…been here just over 5 years so that should be good to go. Also, income requirements has been met.

So…gotta contact FBI and send request for criminal record. This is gonna be the slowest part. I have to send fingerprints and file papers. Then they’ll mail it to my family which mails it to the Taipei Office in Chicago to verify. Then parents receive it and mail it to me. Afterwards I need a friend to translate it and go with me to court office. Once verified and what not then I can send it in with the rest of the paperwork. Crazy. This is gonna take months.


#14

[quote=“calitotaiwan”]I’ve renewed my ARC five times…been here just over 5 years so that should be good to go. Also, income requirements has been met.

So…gotta contact FBI and send request for criminal record. This is gonna be the slowest part. I have to send fingerprints and file papers. Then they’ll mail it to my family which mails it to the Taipei Office in Chicago to verify. Then parents receive it and mail it to me. Afterwards I need a friend to translate it and go with me to court office. Once verified and what not then I can send it in with the rest of the paperwork. Crazy. This is gonna take months.[/quote]

Remember you don’t need to do this if you’ve never left the country for more than (IIRC) 30 days at a stretch. You just need the local police record. This is one of the things that’s got a whole lot simpler recently.


#15

[quote=“calitotaiwan”]I’ve renewed my ARC five times…been here just over 5 years so that should be good to go. Also, income requirements has been met.

So…gotta contact FBI and send request for criminal record. This is gonna be the slowest part. I have to send fingerprints and file papers. Then they’ll mail it to my family which mails it to the Taipei Office in Chicago to verify. Then parents receive it and mail it to me. Afterwards I need a friend to translate it and go with me to court office. Once verified and what not then I can send it in with the rest of the paperwork. Crazy. This is gonna take months.[/quote]

Caliti, please, go to NIA FIRST. Do not start any procedure until you have their go ahead, after they officially check your records and confirm you qualify.

You can save a lot of work. And avoid nasty surprises.


#16

What she said. The procedure is pretty simple, but go and talk to someone if you haven’t already. It is, in fact, the first step of the process to have a meeting with a NIA official to check the basics and get everything explained in person. A lot of the legwork they will do for you : for example, checking you entry/exit records.


#17

Here’s another vote for “Worth it”. Absolutely. Life is sooooo much easier with an APRC.


#18

Again a great example. Thank you finley.

To the OP:

You asked for help. People with first hand experience answered. They gave you accurate information. And then you go off into lala land on you own way.

Friggen’ go to the NIA. YOU DON’T NEED THE US FBI REPORT ANYMORE. jeeeezus.

Reading comprehension is not that difficult.


#19

[quote=“calitotaiwan”]I’ve renewed my ARC five times…been here just over 5 years so that should be good to go. Also, income requirements has been met.

So…gotta contact FBI and send request for criminal record. This is gonna be the slowest part. I have to send fingerprints and file papers. Then they’ll mail it to my family which mails it to the Taipei Office in Chicago to verify. Then parents receive it and mail it to me. Afterwards I need a friend to translate it and go with me to court office. Once verified and what not then I can send it in with the rest of the paperwork. Crazy. This is gonna take months.[/quote]

Wait, I retract my previous post. Yes, you need to do all this. First of all they will require you to pass a basic level (12 year old) IQ test. Then you have to prove you are actually a humanoid. Then they make you prove you aren’t actually a real “alien”. This last part is a little sticky. Samples of your DNA and RNA are required and they will run the tests to determine whether or not you are related to any known aliens. After that you will be required to provide tissue samples not just the blood samples you gave before.

Good luck.


#20

Alright alright. I’m going to the office Monday.