APRC: Worth it?


#61

[quote=“Taiwan_Student”]I am rooting for you. I had an A-hole person way back when I was trying to apply for my 10-year ARC. The man was so Anal, that he erased all the “Taiwan” and “Taiwanese” from the nationality blanks on the form and replaced it with “Republic of China” and “Chinese” I was denied the first time. But, when I came back, everything had been transformed to a very user friendly and yes, helpful office. What a difference a year made. Your guy needs to retire.
Good luck… I still would love to look up my old officer and visit his old age home to annoying him. I can be annoying as Sponge Bob. The APRC makes all the difference. I’m glad I no longer have to go what you are going through. Good luck.[/quote]

There is no such thing as a “10 year ARC”.

And as far as ROC/Chinese are concerned, these are the official names hence the government uses them. If you don’t like it ask Hartzell for a “taiwan civil government id card”.


#62

There was not a ten year thing. It was a long time I ago, I’m sure there was. Maybe it was five years. Well no matter, I got my APRC. And it was thanks to the leaving of Mr. Anal in a county that rhymes with the sound of a bell. I mentioned what was happening to the guy with the latest problem and described his attitude. I think my guy may have retired by now, but if not my wife put forth this idea. In the government, the small cities on the East Coast is like a demotion for some government workers. They really want to get out of these areas. And if they are stuck there, they develop an attitude.

I’m sure the poster is not after the wife’s money and will not cut and run after recieving the APRC, but this sort of thing is very rampent among foreigner brides. Especially brides from south East Asia. It happened to a distant relative. The person was very open about what she would do when she was granted citizenship. After it happened, she left the kid and hubby and off she went. It’s more common than you would know. Now, where can I get Hartzel’s card. He sure helped me in the beginning, but I think he is spinning his wheels on this one. I am forever in his debt for walking me through each stage from ARC, to work permit and to getting my kids Taiwanese Citizenship. I wish he’d come back to the fold and start arguing for Dual citizenship rights.


#63

About the permanent resident certificate … as long as they print your passport number on it, it looks like it’s not that permanent.
What would happen if you don’t renew your passport the moment it expires? Could be for several reasons like not planning to travel abroad anymore being one … a passport is just a travel document, and as in Taiwan you can get a passport as overseas Chinese without being a citizen (proof of case) … so basically some passports are just travel documents.
Therefor, could someone lobby with the government to have the connection passport/APRC removed. They already do the same for a spousal ARC and later don’t add the spouses name on the APRC. Making that you kind of need to apply for work permit.

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#64

[quote=“Belgian Pie”]About the permanent resident certificate … as long as they print your passport number on it, it looks like it’s not that permanent.
What would happen if you don’t renew your passport the moment it expires? Could be for several reasons like not planning to travel abroad anymore being one … a passport is just a travel document, and as in Taiwan you can get a passport as overseas Chinese without being a citizen (proof of case) … so basically some passports are just travel documents.
Therefor, could someone lobby with the government to have the connection passport/APRC removed. They already do the same for a spousal ARC and later don’t add the spouses name on the APRC. Making that you kind of need to apply for work permit.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 4[/quote]

Regarding passport expiration:
Yep, that is a problem. As I have said before, there will be a time when I get too old to get on a plane and get a new passport. No representatives here of my ol country. Then what? I hope I have become a citizen of this lovely island by then.
Don’t think they can remove it, as they need some kind of proof of our “foreigness”, though.

I do not understand the connection between spousal ARC and APRC. Of course they remove the name from the APRC, you are no longer dependent on your wife/husband for a visa/reason to live here. For the same reason, they do not include the name of your workplace for us singles. When you have the APRC, you already have the right of taking any job, no more work permits required.

Or are you referring to the JFVC?

Why would you need to apply for work permit if you have APRC? You only need to apply for Open Work Permit, 20 minutes thinghie.


#65

[quote=“Icon”] Regarding passport expiration:
Yep, that is a problem. As I have said before, there will be a time when I get too old to get on a plane and get a new passport. No representatives here of my ol country. Then what? I hope I have become a citizen of this lovely island by then.
Don’t think they can remove it, as they need some kind of proof of our “foreigness”, though. [/quote]

The obligation to possess a valid passport follows a very simple rationale: without a valid travel document you are not deportable.
Some people here may see too much in an Alien Permanent Resident Certificate. An APRC is only permanent in that it comes without a purpose of stay that could expire. As far as deportable offences are concerned APRC holders have no privilege over a foreign student who entered the country a few months ago.


#66

[quote=“hsinhai78”][quote=“Icon”] Regarding passport expiration:
Yep, that is a problem. As I have said before, there will be a time when I get too old to get on a plane and get a new passport. No representatives here of my ol country. Then what? I hope I have become a citizen of this lovely island by then.
Don’t think they can remove it, as they need some kind of proof of our “foreigness”, though. [/quote]

The obligation to possess a valid passport follows a very simple rationale: without a valid travel document you are not deportable.
Some people here may see too much in an Alien Permanent Resident Certificate. An APRC is only permanent in that it comes without a purpose of stay that could expire. As far as deportable offences are concerned APRC holders have no privilege over a foreign student who entered the country a few months ago.[/quote]

Thanks for the insight. Never thought about it that way. :cactus:

Bit more salt needed, no? battery acid, perhaps?


#67

Uh… open work permit… It’s like here somewhere… I think I lost it. I’m the owner of a small business but I think I want to take an outside job. Do I have to dig up the work permit or ask for a new one? It was just a letter.

I’m APRC based on spouse if that means anything.


#68

Open work permit … work permit … what gives

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#69

[quote=“Taiwan_Student”]Uh… open work permit… It’s like here somewhere… I think I lost it. I’m the owner of a small business but I think I want to take an outside job. Do I have to dig up the work permit or ask for a new one? It was just a letter.

I’m APRC based on spouse if that means anything.[/quote]

There is no APRC based on spouse. The APRC is based on nothing no mo.

You may have a JFVC, which is not permanent -depends on your spousal condition.

If what you have is an APRC: The Open Work Permit is a right is you have the APRC. So just go to the office, tell them you lost the paper, fill out another form, pay 50nts and get another piece of paper.

If what you have is a JFVC, then you also have the right to work but as to what piece of paper ask the married folk.


#70

[quote=“Icon”][quote=“Taiwan_Student”]Uh… open work permit… It’s like here somewhere… I think I lost it. I’m the owner of a small business but I think I want to take an outside job. Do I have to dig up the work permit or ask for a new one? It was just a letter.

I’m APRC based on spouse if that means anything.[/quote]

There is no APRC based on spouse. The APRC is based on nothing no mo.

You may have a JFVC, which is not permanent -depends on your spousal condition.

If what you have is an APRC: The Open Work Permit is a right is you have the APRC. So just go to the office, tell them you lost the paper, fill out another form, pay 50nts and get another piece of paper.

If what you have is a JFVC, then you also have the right to work but as to what piece of paper ask the married folk.[/quote]

JFRV issued after Spring 2013 come with a red annotation next to your spouses’s name that reads “The holder of this certificate is exempt from obtaining a work permit to engage in work”.


#71

My wife is waiting for her APRC. It has been 1 month. We don’t know the status. We were just told to wait for a call from the immigration office for the result/status.

I have a question. In a few years, we may move abroad, if we can back for Chinese New Year for 2 weeks every year, does she need to anything to keep the APRC valid?

(1) Someone told me that for APRC you are allowed to leave the country for up to 5 years. But then what happens? Does she need to stay in TW for 1/2 years to keep the APRC?

(2) A friend told me that it is better to have a regular 3 year ARC. Then you can leave the country for 3 years and just need to come back a few days to renew for another 3 year ARC.

Any information about this is much appreciated.


#72

(1) I believe that the normal regulation is that an APRC holder must reside in Taiwan for at least 183 days each calendar year, but this rule may be exempted with permission from the “competent authorities” (that’s what is printed on the back of the card). I’ve read that this residence exemption can be up to five years, or at least that’s the proposal that’s been presented. Not sure if it’s been approved yet.

(2) A three year ARC? I wasn’t aware there was such a thing. Is that for folks under JFRV?


#73

[quote=“Steve4nLanguage”]
(2) A three year ARC? I wasn’t aware there was such a thing. Is that for folks under JFRV?[/quote]

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resident_Certificate

The applicant may apply for a maximum of three years validity for the ARC, with some categories (for example missionary work or study) being limited to a maximum of one year at a time.


#74

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resident_Certificate
There is also an Alien Permanent Resident Certificate or APRC available… “holder must either remain in the country for 183 days per year or else arrange an exemption with the National Immigration Agency in order to maintain permanent residency.”

So if one who is married to a Taiwanese needs to leave Taiwan for a few years, it may be better not to get the APRC and instead get a 3-year ARC, as ARC doesn’t have the explicit requirement of 183 days:-)


#75

Nope. Currently, the law says you must stay here 183 days a year. You can ask for permission to leave for periods of up to 2 years, from NIA, not 5, or at least not at the same time. this requisite is being currently evaluated by the respective agencies and probably will be eliminated soon but not yet, so at this moment, you will be constrained.

Sure, you can renew for a regular ARC… a new ARC, with new work permit and start all over again from scratch, dependent on your probable new employer. Why would you do that and lose the freedom of the APRC?

The ARC is not your best recourse, as no employer will give you an ARC and then not have you show up for work more than 6 months out of a year. Remember: the ARC means you are dependent on someone else for your visa/work permit/justification to be here. You are more constrained with ARC, not less.

Again, please, do not go with “someone told me”. Go to NIA, explain your situation, have them give you WRITTEN clarification on YOUR condition as per YOUR specific situation. There is always some recourse, there are always choices. Do not give up on mere hearsay.


#76

[quote=“Icon”]Nope. Currently, the law says you must stay here 183 days a year. You can ask for permission to leave for periods of up to 2 years, from NIA, not 5, or at least not at the same time. this requisite is being currently evaluated by the respective agencies and probably will be eliminated soon but not yet, so at this moment, you will be constrained.

Again, please, do not go with “someone told me”. Go to NIA, explain your situation, have them give you WRITTEN clarification on YOUR condition as per YOUR specific situation. There is always some recourse, there are always choices. Do not give up on mere hearsay.[/quote]

Will definitely check with NIA first.

I am Taiwanese, so my wife has no problem getting ARC renewed while we live in TW. But we would like to go abroad for a few years and she would like to keep the health insurance. We will keep paying the monthly fee. So what is the best way to do that?:slight_smile:


#77

So she’s got a JFRV, not a plain ARC, right?

For health insurance issues, you have to deal with the DOH -right on the corner of Civil Boulevard and Zhongshan North road, a stone’s throw away from Taipei Main Station. Since she is married, and you guys will be still paying, logic says she should be able to keep it. That is why the JFRV is important.


#78

[quote=“netuser”]

Will definitely check with NIA first.

I am Taiwanese, so my wife has no problem getting ARC renewed while we live in TW. But we would like to go abroad for a few years and she would like to keep the health insurance. We will keep paying the monthly fee. So what is the best way to do that?:-)[/quote]

In this instance it might not make any sense to get an APRC since there isn’t much benefit compared to an ARC via JFRV.


#79

[quote=“Abacus”]
In this instance it might not make any sense to get an APRC since there isn’t much benefit compared to an ARC via JFRV.[/quote]

It looks like it. Thanks.


#80

is this site up to date as per the new rules you guys discuss?

immigration.gov.tw/ct.asp?x … 30085&mp=2