Arabic Class Open in Taipei


#1

I went to the Mosque [


#2

Yeah, but how much Arabic could you learn from ground zero? And isn’t New York City a bit far?


#3

As much as you can.

Arabic is a phonetic language. Once you get to read the its phonetic, and with some basic grammar, you can manage a conversation already.

and please keep the NY sentiment away…

regards,

ax


#4

This post has lost its relevance, if indeed it had any to start with. :wink:


#5

I wouldn’t mind learning Arabic, but I don’t want to waste my time in a traditional class-type instruction situation. If it were a tutoring situation where the students could indicate what methods were to be used, I might be up for it.


#6

I have no intention to allude to NY. Here’s what my random house gives on the entry:
ground zero n.
1. the point on the surface of the earth or water directly below,
directly above, or at which an atomic or hydrogen bomb explodes.
2. Informal. the very beginning or most elementary level.

I might consider changing it to “from alibata.”

regards

ax


#7

This post has lost its relevance, if indeed it had any to start with. :wink:


#8

Stop picking on me. You are hurting my pride:)
I have edited the my previous post to satisfy your inkling for PC statement.

regards,

ax


#9

This post has lost its relevance, if indeed it had any to start with. :wink:


#10

If you want to learn how to read and write Arabic, get this book: The Arabic Alphabet: How to Read and Write It


#11

Juba,

I actually have similar books on Arabic but it couldn’t help me much on pronouncing it. For one thing I don’t have a good ear. I also have internet site that give arabic sounds of each aphabet. But I don’t think the audio output please my distereod ear.

The reason why I want to take a basic course in Arabic is that I want to have a good basic of the pronounciation, have a good teacher to mimic to, and confirm if I pronounce them right.

Once I pass this course, I can be on my own and go thru books available out there.

Cheers

ax


#12

Alleycat: would you say this post has lost its relevance ?


#13

No. It didn’t have any to start with. :smiling_imp:


#14

A Turkish joke:

Once there was an Arab, an American, a Russian and a tour guide, they were driving in the Sahara desert, when suddenly, the car broke down. So they all got off, and the tour guide said, “Ok, don’t panic, we will have to walk from now on, so each of you bring something with you that can be useful on the way.”
So the American got food out of his bag, the tour guide said, “Good thinking, we need food to survive.”
The Russian took his water with him, the tour guide said, “Yes, we definitely need water.”
Then the tour guide saw the Arab breaking the car door off. And he brought it with him.
Then the tour guide said, “Why the hell have you brought a car door with you?”
The Arab said, “Well, you see, if it gets really hot we can always roll down the window…”


#15

By the way, they also offer Arabic classes at National Political University. Usual semester system, textbooks from Saudi Arabia, course taught in Chinese for starters.

By the way, about that mosque thing–you’d better nail down what kind of Arabic you’ll be studying, since it’s apparently not classical / Qur’anic. You want Moroccan, Egyptian, Levantine, or Gulf?

If you’re really interested, go make some money in the Middle East and learn Arabic at the same time. After the war, that is. Learn some here first while you’re waiting.


#16

Thanks Vincent for the info.
I do have a less prioritized plan of going to Dubai. If there’s a job. A work in Arabic localization company would tempt me.
Otherwise I’ll visit a friend of mine who is currrently working in Dubai. He told me Dubai is a nice place to visit, a very Internationalized city. I’d love to be there:)

regards,

ax


#17

I’ve been to the Arabic class on Monday. Only 5 students including me present. The class have been going on for 1 year. All students are Taiwanese. They can read and write considerably in Arabic now. I was lost in the class. But the Imam had been gracious enough to devote some times at the end of the session to train my basic pronunciation. He also gave me a CD containing arabic lessons. It was a new experience. I think I will be there again tonight. Even if I still couldn’t follow the class. I wish to be able to follow the class in 3 month time.

regards,
ax


#18

Anton,

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