Are foreigners allowed to participate in political campaigns

What’s the status for foreigners to comment or participate in politics here. I saw some articles in the paper warning foreigners that is is illegal to get up on stage with candidates etc. But I have also seen some foreigners in campaign commercials. I’m guessing it’s okay if you are married, although why that would make any difference is beyond me!

God, I hope you didn’t see the one I was in in 2004. :stuck_out_tongue:

Maybe…I’ve seen a few dodgy ones. But anyway from my recollection you have a Taiwanese ID right. I’m trying to ascertain the rights of foreigners to participate in any form of open political discussion here instead of appearing as monkeys talking about some funny thing that happened to them in Taiwan.

As of early 2002 there was no law against foreigners getting on stage at a political rally and making a speech. The reason I remember this is that there was a flap about someone doing just that. The person was also a Taiwan citizen but had entered Taiwan on the German passport and so technically counted as a “foreigner.”

NB: If people got upset that an ROC citizen did this, “real” foreigners who happen to be married to locals should most definitely not count on things going without incident for them.

There were plans to change the law so things like this wouldn’t happen again. My guess would be that these changes did pass. But how far the law goes I don’t know.

While visiting the Tainan Ma hdqtrs wife the wife I handed out tea and snacks to folks.

Don’t expect any letters of inquiry over that.

(I told the staff that some Taiwan pijoe or Ky Bourbon would be better received - they nervously giggled)

Have they got to you, too? repeat afer me: “I hold ROC citizenship. I am not a foreigner.”

on a more serious note, I have spotted a youngish foreign woman at several DPP rallies who appears to be acting in a staffer capacity. Don’t know if she is a volunteer or how that would fall under this law.

Ok, so no concrete information yet.

Anyway, I also want to know why it is illegal for foreigners to participate in campaigns? What is the point of this according to Taiwanese and surely western countries don’t have such laws, right?

I’m sick and tired of seeing foreigners asked for their views on everything except the stuff that matters… it’s a joke.

It is illegal because it goes beyond the basic purpose of your residence visa, being it working or studying. That is their argument, and they do stick to it.

Apologizing if I sound offensive.

Can somebody please show us a good instance of any democractic country in the world where foreigners are allowed to participate in political campaign. Foreigner I presume, refers to the person who is not a native nor naturalized citizen of the land where they are residing. Inclusive it should include those PRs who by nature they are still legally not a citizen (non-voting rights) of the country.

There is no doubt that the majority of the foreigners (even in the forum) do contribute immersely in one way or another, towards the development progress of Taiwan. However, it’s also ludicrious to see and hear some foreigners going to some extreme extent, lobbying for certain party or person(s) where they’ve no constitution rights to do just that. Look around at those pro-DPP websites like View from Taiwan, A-Gu blah blah. Are they run by foreigners or what? It doesn’t matter whether they’ve Taiwanese spouse or not, but they are still foreigner in all aspects. Maybe they have some ulterior motives (paid by CIA again?) to sow discord and disunity in Taiwan society and/or between Taiwan and China based on their tainted and unbalanced reports in the same manner as Radio Free Asia.
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[quote=“beebee”]Apologizing if I sound offensive.

Can somebody please show us a good instance of any democractic country in the world where foreigners are allowed to participate in political campaign [/quote]

Well Taiwanese student non-citizens can attend political rallies in the US.

[quote=“Seattle Times”]

“We would like him to visit in a formal way and to recognize him,” said Yen-cheng Chang, 28, a doctoral student from Taiwan at the University of Washington. “Because of China, we can’t do that.” [/quote]

Canada. Human Rights in Canada apply to everybody in Canada, not just Canadians. I’m pretty sure it’s the same in most other western countries.

I’m not sure that being able to participate in another country’s political campiagns would be considered a “human right”.

[quote=“Maoman”][quote=“beebee”]Apologizing if I sound offensive.

Can somebody please show us a good instance of any democractic country in the world where foreigners are allowed to participate in political campaign.[/quote]
Canada. Human Rights in Canada apply to everybody in Canada, not just Canadians. I’m pretty sure it’s the same in most other western countries.[/quote]

Yeah, that’s true. I’m not a huge fan of Trudeau, but the Charter of Rights and Freedoms applies to everyone in Canada.

What I find annoying right now is that many Chinese interest groups in Canada are protesting the Conservative government’s proposed changes to Canada’s immigration policy (which basically give the immigration minister the power to decide who leaves and who stays in Canada). I mean, Taiwanese and Chinese in Canada can become citizens and vote in three years without giving up their nationality. Reciprocity sure isn’t offered in this regard. Don’t they feel a little bit hypocritical in criticizing these minor reforms?

theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ … y/National

Political participation is a basic right in Canada, and freedom of assembly, freedom of association, freedom of speech, and freedom of thought all guarantee one’s rights to participate. “All individuals should have an opportunity equal with other individuals to make for themselves the lives that they are able and wish to have and to have their needs accommodated, consistent with their duties and obligations as members of society, without being hindered in or prevented from doing so by discriminatory practices based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, family status, disability or conviction for an offence for which a pardon has been granted.”

laws.justice.gc.ca/en/ShowFullDoc/cs/H-6///en

Political participation is a basic right in Canada, and freedom of assembly, freedom of association, freedom of speech, and freedom of thought all guarantee one’s rights to participate. “All individuals should have an opportunity equal with other individuals to make for themselves the lives that they are able and wish to have and to have their needs accommodated, consistent with their duties and obligations as members of society, without being hindered in or prevented from doing so by discriminatory practices based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, family status, disability or conviction for an offence for which a pardon has been granted.”

laws.justice.gc.ca/en/ShowFullDoc/cs/H-6///en[/quote]

I believe this refers to not discriminating based on a citizen’s national or ethnic origin. I don’t think it means that backpacker English teachers :smiling_imp: (or others) should necessarily enjoy the same participatory political rights in the countries they happen to find themselves. There’s a remedy for that, even in Taiwan: naturalize!

Political participation is a basic right in Canada, and freedom of assembly, freedom of association, freedom of speech, and freedom of thought all guarantee one’s rights to participate. “All individuals should have an opportunity equal with other individuals to make for themselves the lives that they are able and wish to have and to have their needs accommodated, consistent with their duties and obligations as members of society, without being hindered in or prevented from doing so by discriminatory practices based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, family status, disability or conviction for an offence for which a pardon has been granted.”

laws.justice.gc.ca/en/ShowFullDoc/cs/H-6///en[/quote]

I believe this refers to not discriminating based on a citizen’s national or ethnic origin. I don’t think it means that backpacker English teachers :smiling_imp: (or others) should necessarily enjoy the same participatory political rights in the countries they happen to find themselves. There’s a remedy for that, even in Taiwan: naturalize![/quote]
Sorry, you missed my point. Beebee was wondering if other countries allowed foreigners to participate in politics, and I said that Canada does, so all backpacker Mandarin teachers in Canada, who are otherwise legally staying in Canada are absolutely entitled to their participation. It would be highly unlikely that anything other than low-level participation would be welcomed by any political organization (who wants to be the candidate supported by foreigners?) but sure, they have the right.

Political participation is a basic right in Canada, and freedom of assembly, freedom of association, freedom of speech, and freedom of thought all guarantee one’s rights to participate. “All individuals should have an opportunity equal with other individuals to make for themselves the lives that they are able and wish to have and to have their needs accommodated, consistent with their duties and obligations as members of society, without being hindered in or prevented from doing so by discriminatory practices based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, family status, disability or conviction for an offence for which a pardon has been granted.”

laws.justice.gc.ca/en/ShowFullDoc/cs/H-6///en[/quote]

I believe this refers to not discriminating based on a citizen’s national or ethnic origin. I don’t think it means that backpacker English teachers :smiling_imp: (or others) should necessarily enjoy the same participatory political rights in the countries they happen to find themselves. There’s a remedy for that, even in Taiwan: naturalize![/quote]
Sorry, you missed my point. Beebee was wondering if other countries allowed foreigners to participate in politics, and I said that Canada does, so all backpacker Mandarin teachers in Canada, who are otherwise legally staying in Canada are absolutely entitled to their participation. It would be highly unlikely that anything other than low-level participation would be welcomed by any political organization (who wants to be the candidate supported by foreigners?) but sure, they have the right.[/quote]

Well, if his point was that participation by a foreigner in the politics of another country is not a basic human right I would have to agree with him. The UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 21:
Everyone has the right to take part in the government of his country, directly or through freely chosen representatives.

This would seem to suggest that from a human rights perspective, the only universal human right of political participation extends to one’s own country. Of course, each country is free to extend political access to whomever it sees fit, in whatever manner it sees fit.

Some clarification regarding the Taiwan law would be useful. To my understanding, it may be ok to participate here, i.e. volunteer for a candidate, but a foreigner may not actively campaign or endorse a candidate. Fine line distinction, perhaps. Have the authorities in Taiwan ever actually arrested someone for doing this? I know there was talk about Ma’s sister, but she may be a dual citizen?

Expressing one’s political beliefs and “taking part in the government of one’s country” are two different things. I think we’re talking about the former, not the latter. If I want to get up on a stage in Canada and sing the praises of a Canadian politician, it doesn’t matter what my nationality is. That’s not true for Taiwan.

Perhaps, but then again, “expressing one’s political beliefs” and taking part in the political campaign of a foreign state are also two arguably different things. I’ve taken this conversation to be about the latter, and while I might not necessarily agree, I think Taiwan is within its rights to restrict this activity.