Article: Taiwan "...on the brink of tourism greatness."

I am not sure how I feel about that. Would need to do more research on population numbers and stability of game before forming an opinion. Seems some species are doing alright, but others not so much. I ought to ask my people about this.

btw, they were out all night and came back at dawn empty-handed.

[quote=“tommy525”]With the loss of manufacturing jobs to China. Taiwan has to become more like Japan and earn its keep providing knowhow, tech, etc etc. Things outside manufacturing that now China excels at. Therefore tourism is and will be more important.

That being said, it was kinda nice before when everywhere you go you only see Taiwanese and a few foreign residents. No tourists to speak of. Gives it a kind of insular quality. Hard to explain but it wasn’t all bad.

Now the tourists are going to be driving up prices for hotels in many scenic areas around Taiwan. Hopefully this will be offset by better facilities and competition will bring prices back inline.

Its a change we have to live with.[/quote]

Couldnt agree more, the last time I was at Sun Moon Lake in Feb, there were way too many tourist from the mainland, queues were long everywhere, heaps of boats belching diesel smoke was zipping too and fro, it was horrifying and I swore never to return to that area…

[quote=“kdk”]
Couldnt agree more, the last time I was at Sun Moon Lake in Feb, there were way too many tourist from the mainland, queues were long everywhere, heaps of boats belching diesel smoke was zipping too and fro, it was horrifying and I swore never to return to that area…[/quote]
I know a great many people who pick travel destinations by the absence or at least low numbers of Chinese tourists. Having more in Taiwan will only make it harder to market the destination to other nationalities. I do hope Taiwan continues to funnel them into places I have no interest in anyway, like SML.

Yes, tourism greatness is just around the corner. :roflmao:
Models escape from ‘hell’

[quote=“chung”]Yes, tourism greatness is just around the corner. :roflmao:
Models escape from ‘hell’[/quote]
OUCH! What a complete clusterfuck! An entirely unsurprising one, nonetheless. :roflmao:

I thought the article was a bit weak. Odd title, too. I’ll bet it’s not at not at all what the author had in mind. :cactus:

I completely agree. The editor likely cut the section where he examines the tourist industry’s most exciting sector. :discodance:

I completely agree. The editor likely cut the section where he examines the tourist industry’s most exciting sector. :discodance:[/quote]
No WAY! This has GOT to be a parody website. PLEASE tell me its a parody. :roflmao:

I completely agree. The editor likely cut the section where he examines the tourist industry’s most exciting sector. :discodance:[/quote]
No WAY! This has GOT to be a parody website. PLEASE tell me its a parody. :roflmao:[/quote]

Afterwards they take the kids to the industrial parks.

Now I still contend that Taiwan isn’t up to par for families to come on their own with no contacts on the island. Backpackers sure, they’ve been coming forever and they’ll live anywhere. As far as Americans spending $100 for a visa to visit this island for a F&%$ing vacation without friends or family being here, you’ve got to be out of your mind. :loco:

As far as the Taiwan factory tours, those are cool and surprisingly clean and enjoyable. I’ve been on several factory tours with my kindergartens and I’ve liked them all. Do they have those for the beer factory in Wuri? I think people would really like factory tours judging from some of the shows they put on Discovery Channel.

People should have some concept where their junk comes from.

[quote=“Okami”]

As far as the Taiwan factory tours, those are cool and surprisingly clean and enjoyable. [/quote]

Yeah, replace that ‘Taiwan: touch your heart’ slogan with ‘Taiwan: clean and enjoyable’.

Great marketing concept. :wink:

Right. And I don’t think it’s terribly easy for a non-Chinese speaker to organise independent travel in Taiwan.

Before their visit here, my sister and her boyfriend had travelled to quite a few countries before, and when they read the Taiwan Lonely Planet they got the impression that organising travel, hotels, etc. here would be a breeze. But it wasn’t as easy as they thought and they were very glad that I could help with that stuff. They did feel fine about doing their own thing in Taipei, and they also went on a bus tour to Puli and Sun Moon Lake, which was good though conducted at the typical hectic Taiwanese bus tour pace. But they appreciated my help with the rest of their visit.

Might be a good slogan for the women of Puli :laughing:

I’m only marginally educated in irony. Care to elaborate a bit, since you seem to have met the dude who wrote it? I expected a biting slap at chung out of you, or is he in fact the smartest boy in the class on this topic?

Personally, I know you don’t. :blush:

RK is right; it’s about to take off here. I realised that after spending the best part of Saturday afternoon in a gorgeous Wulai swimming hole. We have some of the best scenery in the world here, friendly people, and great food. Plus, it’s cheaper to travel here than stay at home. All it needs is the backpackers to come and the infrastructure to be built up around their needs and wants, and we are a tourist destination.

Time to open Stray Dog’s beach hostel and bar, methinks . . .[/quote]

WuLai town is an absolute hole , an out and out disgrace in how they string hundreds of plastic pipes across the river. It’s an example of what not to do with a beautiful hot spring area. The area around WuLai is pretty nice if you know the right spots though. There are better hot spring spots in Taiwan than WuLai but they are hard to get to without a car. This is the reason that many foreigners who live in Taiwan don’t know it has so many great places because they are almost inaccessible without a car.

It’s not SO easy to travel around Taiwan for foreigenrs and in many places the youth hostels are still too expensive. My friend came over before and even though I had arranged the tickets for him to visit the east coast, due to the train switching in Ilan for Hualien (which I did not know), he missed the connection although people did help him to get the next one quite a bit later. The TRA still has no English on their trains in general although they recently did dain to put some English on their automatic ticket machines. It’s easy and efficient for me to travel around Taiwan because I speak Chinese and can READ Chinese, but that is not the case for most foreigners.

Things have improved a lot though and hopefully will keep improving without going down the lowest common denominator mass tourism route.

There is a little town way up river from wulai (fushan?) that you can get to by taxi for about… NTD500 I think the quote was. That has got to be a gorgeous spot. I’ve been about halfway and wow was that nice. I think there are homestays up there as well, though I get the impression people regard the town itself to be a bit of a boozy backwater.