BA written in French. How do I do this?

Hello Forumosians! :slight_smile:

I’m a 34 yr old white male from Quebec, Canada. I’m a native speaker of both French and English as I’ve lived in the USA when I was younger.

The interrogation I have is with my BA in English and Intercultural Studies( literature, translation and professional writing) I got from a French University.
The whole 3-year curriculum was given in English, by English professors, but the diploma is written in French, as well as the name of the BA. ‘‘Études anglaises et interculturelles: littérature, traduction et rédaction.’’ I’ve asked the University and they won’t provide me with an English version of my diploma.

I wonder how to deal with that. Do I need an official notarized translation of my diploma, with the Taiwan ‘‘embassy’’ stamp of approval or something similar?

I found most of the info I need on the countless pages of the forum but there are still some specifics I need to clarify. Your help is much appreciated! :wink:

That’s about right. I had a similar problem with my degree. I needed to

  1. Obtain a confirmation letter from the university stating that I studied/completed my course in XX-XX (year)
  2. Go to the Taiwan Embassy, Translate it, Copy it, Prove it.
  3. Job Done

Oh Lord! This is gonna be fun…

They don’t even have an office in Montreal. Only Toronto and Vancouver. Think I’ll have to do this by mail…

I’m not sure I understand the whole process.

  1. I ask for the confirmation letter form my uni. Simple enough.
  2. What do I need to get from the Taiwan Embassy exactly? Do I need my diploma translated BEFORE I ask the embassy for anything? Does it have to be done by a licensed translator?

Thanks!

[quote=“Cinephile”]
2. What do I need to get from the Taiwan Embassy exactly? Do I need my diploma translated BEFORE I ask the embassy for anything? Does it have to be done by a licensed translator? [/quote]

  • You have to get it translated BEFORE you ask the embassy. (This should be done using the same layout/format as your BA certificate)
  • NO you don’t need a licensed translator, my gf just did it for me and it was fine. BUT, you will need to pay a fee for it to be “PROVEN” (You will do this at the embassy)

I can’t remember much else I’m afraid :frowning: . What I do remember is make sure you get like 4 copies of your translated docs

You could send it all by air mail once you’ve completed all the application forms and necessary documents e.t.c. I always felt that doing this type of things, especially with the Embassy abroad is to either call/face to face, they don’t prioritize e-mails.

Double-Post, sorry

Thank you so much HS. You’ve provided me with a lot of info already!

I just ordered the confirmation letter from my uni.

I’ll try to call their office tomorrow and see how I can deal with this by mail. I see there’s a form on the website, but it’s missing info. I’ll make sure to include 4 copies of each translated document.

Oh well, no one said it was gonna be easy, right? :wink:

[quote=“Cinephile”]Hello Forumosians! :slight_smile:

I’m a 34 yr old white male from Quebec, Canada. I’m a native speaker of both French and English as I’ve lived in the USA when I was younger.

The interrogation I have is with my BA in English and Intercultural Studies( literature, translation and professional writing) I got from a French University.
The whole 3-year curriculum was given in English, by English professors, but the diploma is written in French, as well as the name of the BA. ‘‘Études anglaises et interculturelles: littérature, traduction et rédaction.’’ I’ve asked the University and they won’t provide me with an English version of my diploma.

I wonder how to deal with that. Do I need an official notarized translation of my diploma, with the Taiwan ‘‘embassy’’ stamp of approval or something similar?

I found most of the info I need on the countless pages of the forum but there are still some specifics I need to clarify. Your help is much appreciated! :wink:[/quote]

It is quite possible that you won’t qualify for a job as an English teacher. I believe that French Universities in Quebec will not qualify you for a working visa as an English teacher. They will qualify you for a work permit to teach French.

If your university is not on the approved list of schools for getting a job a work permit to teach English, you will be shit out of luck.

[quote=“Cinephile”]Hello Forumosians! :slight_smile:

I’m a 34 yr old white male from Quebec, Canada. I’m a native speaker of both French and English as I’ve lived in the USA when I was younger.

The interrogation I have is with my BA in English and Intercultural Studies( literature, translation and professional writing) I got from a French University.
The whole 3-year curriculum was given in English, by English professors, but the diploma is written in French, as well as the name of the BA. ‘‘Études anglaises et interculturelles: littérature, traduction et rédaction.’’ I’ve asked the University and they won’t provide me with an English version of my diploma.

[/quote]

And yet people wonder why the rest of Canada shake their collective heads … a Canadian university that won’t provide an English version of a diploma.

[quote=“steelersman”]

It is quite possible that you won’t qualify for a job as an English teacher. I believe that French Universities in Quebec will not qualify you for a working visa as an English teacher. They will qualify you for a work permit to teach French.

If your university is not on the approved list of schools for getting a job a work permit to teach English, you will be shit out of luck.[/quote]

Have you ever heard of such a thing happening in Taiwan? I know they do this in Korea, but Taiwan? I’m gonna look into this, but I haven’t seen anything to that extent on the different government-related websites.

Any idea where I could find such a list? Can’t seem to find anything on Google.

After a long search on the web and on the forum, I’ve found the list that isn’t available on the MOE website anymore. Thanks to Charlie Jack.
It was taken from the Wayback Machine of the Internet Archive.

http://web.archive.org/web/20080315110816/http://www.edu.tw/EDU_WEB/EDU_MGT/BICER/EDU4146001/ca/ca3.htm

This list is from 2006, but it was still online 2 years ago, and every university in Quebec, as well as every community college were listed there. There is no mention of language.

As long as they haven’t changed their policies since then, I guess I should be ok. I’ll be calling tomorrow.

Thanks for the heads up steelersman! :thumbsup:

Don’t forget to send a thank you note to the language police in Quebec (in French, of course).

[quote=“Cinephile”]After a long search on the web and on the forum, I’ve found the list that isn’t available on the MOE website anymore. Thanks to Charlie Jack.
It was taken from the Wayback Machine of the Internet Archive.

http://web.archive.org/web/20080315110816/http://www.edu.tw/EDU_WEB/EDU_MGT/BICER/EDU4146001/ca/ca3.htm

This list is from 2006, but it was still online 2 years ago, and every university in Quebec, as well as every community college were listed there. There is no mention of language.

As long as they haven’t changed their policies since then, I guess I should be ok. I’ll be calling tomorrow.

Thanks for the heads up steelersman! :thumbsup:[/quote]

I could be wrong, but it is worth a check. It may be that I was just thinking about South Korea.

Ok. So I tried calling TECO in Ottawa a couple of times. Couldn’t reach them, was on hold for too long, so I wrote an email…got an unsatisfying answer. Wrote back and got another non-answer…god. Here’s the only info I got back from my first email:

''Whether your degree will be recognized is entirely dependent on your future employer in Taiwan. (ah come on, the school has nothing to do with that, they don’t deliver the work permit)

To which I answered back : ‘‘Would you please tell me who delivers the work permit and how I may contact them? Someone I can talk to in Canada?’’

‘‘Unfortunately, our offices do not handle work permits (I know that, I asked you to tell me who to reach to get info on that), and to the best of our knowledge, work permits are granted by different domestic departments depending on the nature of your profession (told them I wanted to teach English, as you can see in the next sentence). As for what you need to teach English in Taiwan, you should contact your employer as each organization may require different documentation. ( say what? since when does the school decide what documentation is needed to get a work permit?)’’

So in the end, TECO, at least one out of three offices in Canada, only knows how to put a $16 stamp of approval on a copy of a document (Oddly enough, another TECO office charges $8 for a copy, $16 for an original). That’s it.

They can’t answer my questions, so I don’t know where to go from here. Any ideas?

1. I need to know if my English Studies degree, written in French, delivered by a French university, will be recognized to get my work permit. I know, I have to translate it.
2. I also need to know what specific documentation I need to get ‘‘authenticated’’ before leaving the country. (original degree, translation of degree, transcript, proof of attendance,criminal background check, etc.)

Simple is boring, right? :wink:

Well, a couple of things:

It is true that the employer is the one that applies for the work permit. However, they must comply with current regulations. I cannot believe that the MOE/CLA whatever and whoever is supposed to be in charge would be so cavalier as to let schools hire whoever they want.

It is obvious that requisites for a college teaching job differ from a run of teh mill buxiban, but for Pete’s sake, the way the guy wrote the reply seems something else!

Can anyone confirm the current procedures to get hired? I can’t believe they scrapped the list… how the heck do they accept foreign people into the local univesities, anyways?

It is also true that offices abroad do not deal with work permits. And what is a “domestic department”. I live here and I don’t know what he’s talking about.

Of course, after reading Muzha Mans’ examples of tourist board employees mishandle of tourist information, I shouldn’t be surprised… sigh

Yes. The employer applies for the permit, but he’s not the one who ultimately decides if it’s granted or not. Like you said, can’t believe the authority in charge of delivering the work permit would let the school decide if the person who applies has the necessary qualifications or not.

I have the BA, I come from a country that’s on the list, I speak English fluently, but I can’t just assume that I have what is needed. I need to confirm. Can’t believe it’s that complicated!

[quote=“Cinephile”]Yes. The employer applies for the permit, but he’s not the one who ultimately decides if it’s granted or not. Like you said, can’t believe the authority in charge of delivering the work permit would let the school decide if the person who applies has the necessary qualifications or not.

I have the BA, I come from a country that’s on the list, I speak English fluently, but I can’t just assume that I have what is needed. I need to confirm. Can’t believe it’s that complicated![/quote]

Most probably not. It is just that the person at the TECO does not know the information you are asking for. Deal with them just with certification and such.

I would also logically assume that a knowledgeable, experienced employer here in Taiwan would have to know the procedures much better.

As you said: are you a Native English speaker? Yes, as per your passport -which is all that matters, not even if you speak it well or not. Do you have at least a BA from a recognized, solid institution in your own country -not a fly by night Internet ghost? Yes. So far so good. Criminal record available and uneventful? No problem. CELTAs, relevant experience, etc. are cherries on top.

That’s it. My degree is legit, my university is recognized.
But since they don’t accept online degrees, they have to be using a list of recognized schools, right? Or else how would they know?
But the guy says they don’t, even though the list is on their Chinese website. And the section of the website that contains the list is titled :Academic Verification!

I wrote back to ask him what the list is for then. If he gives me another pointless answer, I’ll call back and ask for a supervisor.

I think you may be asking too much. Try not to push too hard, as the person who will be signing your papers is him. My advice: let it be. Just ask him how to send the stuff to be certified, he knows how to put seals and sign papers, that’s all you can ask of him.

As said, it is probable that he’s acting in good faith. And if he doesn’t know, there is less of a chance that the supervisor will. It is just not his area of scope. Sincerely, if we can’t find an answer here, it would be harder there.

I understand. Just not used to not getting proper answers when I deal with people :wink: Guess I’ll just have to get used to it.

I’ve found some sort of MOE list(s) of universities (it’s really a list of regions, which in turn contain lists of countries, which in turn contain lists of institutions of higher learning), but I’m not 100% sure that it’s the list that determines who gets a work permit and an ARC to teach in Taiwan. I wish I could be more certain, but I can’t.

Here’s the process:

I did a search of my posts and found this one: forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopi … 2#p1361382

I copied this phrase from the above post-- “外國大學參考名冊” (pertinent part of the Google translation: “. . . Foreign University Reference . . . Roster”)–and googled the phrase (just the Chinese one) in double quotes.

I got a Google page with a list of links to webpages, and I clicked on the link to this one: fsedu.moe.gov.tw/

On that webpage, I clicked on the red link that said “美洲地區” (translation through Google Chrome: “Americas”). I got another webpage with links on it: fsedu.moe.gov.tw/country.php?continent_id=6

One of the links on the webpage referenced immediately above was “加拿大” (translation through Google Chrome: “Canada”). I clicked the Canada link and got this webpage: fsedu.moe.gov.tw/list.php?qr … try_id=121