Bankruptcy


#1

I am thinking of moving to asia. I want to experience a different culture, etc… Taiwan is one of my choices.

However, I declared bankruptcy in the last year. Will this affect my ability to get a visa, a job, an apartment, open a bank account, etc… in Taiwan?

Thanks,

PF


#2

First of all, you don’t need a VISA to enter Taiwan. Only to stay longer than the period the immigration officer gives you.

Second, the only thing anyone cares about here is your police record. Well, maybe the bank, if you want to apply for a credit card in Taiwan.

So I doubt you will be affected by your bankruptcy for getting a VISA, working, etc. in Taiwan. However, make sure you bring your college diploma if you want to apply for work, when you come over.


#3
quote[quote] First of all, you don't need a VISA to enter Taiwan [/quote]

this is very wrong. You do need a visa to stay in Taiwan for more than two weeks, which it seems is your attention.

Bri


#4

Won’t make a jot of difference. I am sure it will give you immense pleasure to tell your creditors to get stuffed. With a job and ARC you can open a bank account in Taiwan, and after a while even get a credit card again. Good place to start afresh.


#5
quote[quote] With a job and ARC you can open a bank account in Taiwan, and after a while even get a credit card again. [/quote]

Bollocks, Foreigners can’t get credit cards in Taiwan (I’d love to hear if I’m wrong).

Bri


#6
quote:
Originally posted by Bu Lai En: Bollocks, Foreigners can't get credit cards in Taiwan (I'd love to hear if I'm wrong).
Bri, check out this [url=http://oriented.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic&f=29&t=000218]Ghost of Christmas Past.[/url] It [b]can[/b] be done, it just takes patience. I filled out dozens of applications (and got a lot of useless "free" gifts) before I got mine. And forget about local banks. They are far, far behind the rest of the world when it comes to international banking procedures. American Express has applications at a lot of 7-11s, for visa and mastercard, check out Standard Chartered. Their main branch is on Dunhua North, next to Kiss Disco, just south of Minsheng. They wanted to see my past credit history (from Canada), tax returns (Taiwan) as well as ARC, passport, etc. and once that was done, the rest was as easy as pie. [img]images/smiles/icon_cool.gif[/img]

#7

I have a VISA card thru HSBC. Easier than getting one back in Oz. I suppled passport copy, pay slips and ARC details. Thats it. 10 days later and I had my card.


#8

If you are married to a local you can have a co-card from Citibank and from Shanghai bank. HSBC like 3q has stated gives you your own card. I believe you can get a card from American Express with a passport, ARC, bank book copy or tax statement from the previous year.

Jeff
jeff@oriented.org


#9

True. Many local banks will also offer supplementary cards. It’s important to remember that the supplementary card given is a service provided to the primary card holder (local spouse), and does not mean that you are establishing a credit rating. It does mean that your wife (or husband) is liable for all debts incurred. So if things aren’t working out for the two of you, make sure you go on a shopping spree before you split up for good! Actually, you don’t even need to be married - in most cases, supplementary cards are extended to friends or relatives. Again, no risk for the bank, because it’s the primary cardholder that they’re holding responsible. If you want to establish your own credit rating, then you had better go to one of the international banks…

:sunglasses:


#10

He/She doesn’t even have to be a local, just of Chinese ancestry, apparently. My wife, who holds a Malaysian passport, was able to get a Visa from Citibank when I wasn’t, despite the fact that my salary was roughly 4 times what hers was. This was in 1996. I was, however, able to get a car loan in my own name through Citibank.

For those of you who are wondering, having credit in Taiwan generally does not help your credit rating in the US (I’m not sure yhow it works in other countries). When we returned to the US after about 9 years in Taipei, I essentially had no credit history. This made buying a house a bit difficult. I asked about using my Taiwan credit file, but was told they generally didn’t do that, and it would cost a couple hundred bucks to have it checked. So if you’re here for a long time but plan to go back to the US eventually, try to maintain your US credit cards.


#11

He/She doesn’t even have to be a local, just of Chinese ancestry, apparently. My wife, who holds a Malaysian passport, was able to get a Visa from Citibank when I wasn’t, despite the fact that my salary was roughly 4 times what hers was. This was in 1996. [/quote]

Is that Taiwanese Chinese ancestry or just being ethnically Chinese ? How did they verify it ?


#12

An old topic, please see this link for more information about credit cards.

forums.segue.com.tw/viewtopic.php?t=5756


#13

[quote=“JeffG”]An old topic, please see this link for more information about credit cards.

forums.segue.com.tw/viewtopic.php?t=5756[/quote]

It doesn’t contain the answer to my specific question above.


#14

hexuan,

Just because a post comes after a question post does not mean that that post is a response to the previous posters question… I thought you knew that…