Best school in Asia to get your MBA?

Could someone please help me out, what is the best university in the Asia Pacific to pursue an MBA if money or acceptance is not an obstacle??

Thx in advance!

Check the following sources:

asiaweek.com/asiaweek/features/mba/

asia-inc.com/August04/mba_asias_aug.htm

I’d recommend Singapore or HK as they are both English friendly. If you consider Australia to be part of the Asia-Pac region then they’ve got a couple of good schools.

Do INSEAD in Singapore. A friend and classmate of mine (attended L’Ecole Polytechnique in France and LSE in London) did his MBA there and was very pleased with the results. He also enjoyed jumping on the plane on weekends for diving in Malaysia and Indonesia.

Why do a local MBA when the “big daddies” on the block are now coming to Asia.

chicagogsb.edu/execmba

The University of Chicago is a top-tier business school with a campus in Singapore. The professors, curriculum, culture and (to some extent) the students are the same as the home campus in Hyde Park (they are literally flown in). I completed the entire program while living in Taipei

If you have questions about the Singapore program, drop me a line: gusYOURPANTS@ChicagoGSB.edu (don’t forget to remove YOURPANTS before using this address)

Gus,

You once told me about this program and it seems terrific. I wouldn’t even consider the intense effort of getting a further degree in my “spare time” after work unless it were from a great school such as U. Chicago. I just sent away for their brochure and other info, but in the meantime could you answer the following questions for me:

a. How does it work? I think you said one has to first attend in Singapore for a certain period, then one does it by self-study/internet from Taiwan, but one also has to attend periodically in Singapore or possibly in Chicago one time. I forget the details; can you explain?

b. How much time per day did you spend studying (or do you believe the average student does)?

c. How many months/years does the program take on average?

d. Approximately what is the cost for tuition (and texts)?

Thanks

[quote=“Goose Egg”]http://www.chicagogsb.edu/execmba

The University of Chicago is a top-tier business school with a campus in Singapore. The professors, curriculum, culture and (to some extent) the students are the same as the home campus in Hyde Park (they are literally flown in). I completed the entire program while living in Taipei

If you have questions about the Singapore program, drop me a line: gusYOURPANTS@ChicagoGSB.edu (don’t forget to remove YOURPANTS before using this address)[/quote]

I am interested in it, too.

I am looking into the online MBA of the Open University now. Looks quite interesting to me. What do you guys think?

[quote=“Goose Egg”]http://www.chicagogsb.edu/execmba

The University of Chicago is a top-tier business school with a campus in Singapore. The professors, curriculum, culture and (to some extent) the students are the same as the home campus in Hyde Park (they are literally flown in). I completed the entire program while living in Taipei

If you have questions about the Singapore program, drop me a line: gusYOURPANTS@ChicagoGSB.edu (don’t forget to remove YOURPANTS before using this address)[/quote]

I second that. The best options for an internationally recognised MBAs you can do in Asia are U of Chicago and INSEAD - both with campuses in SG.

The AIT ( Asian Institute ot Technology ) in Bangkok is also a well recognized instition my cousin did his PHd there

There are many good institions of higher education in Asia.

I only just saw this the other day. Feel free to ask more questions of me here - or email me at gus at forumosa.com

Look out for banners or announcements of the GSB’s information session on this website when they happen. There is usually one info session a year from the AXP program (Singapore) and 2 visit by the full-time (Campus) program.

I strongly recommend you visit the AXP campus and prepare to be impressed with a beautiful and comfy facility staffed by some of the most capable people.

The XP (Executive) Program has 3 campuses - Chicago, London and Singapore. If you enroll in the AXP program, then Singapore is your home campus, you will spend more of your class time in Singapore.

The first week, final week (including graduation) and 1 of the 3 weeks in the “Summer Term” (in the middle of the program) are held in Chicago. During the Summer Term, 1 week is spent in Singapore, and 1 in London.

Be careful when you say “self-study from Taiwan” - because it would be simply whatever you study on your own. The entire program is built around the weeks you spend ON CAMPUS. Naturally, it behooves you to read ahead of time, but you are expected to be back at work in a full-time job. Typically, you spend the time between class weeks trying to figure out what just happened, and then preparing for the mid-term or final exams that open the succeeding weeks.

One week of class time is equivalent to half a semester in the fulltime program - so every week there is either a mid-term or a final happening.

Ihe only “Internet” classes that we had were non-credit Math Camps offered BEFORE the actual MBA program begins. It’s the same stuff offered by other MBA schools to new admits who are concerned about their math and economics foundation

Short answer: depending on how close you are to the next visit to school - 5 to 10 hours a week, but on the weekend just prior - double that. That was me

Average student is hard to define - since the profile for the AXP program is very diverse. If you are a good student and you love this stuff, I’d expect you’d to hit the books a couple of hours a day. I don’t really expect anyone to have actually done that (well, maybe one or 2 people I knew). The overwhelming majority of us are in fulltime gigs, married with children (typically young kids, too). So there simply aren’t enough hours in your regular day.

One of the cool things for me during the program was how for 4 or 5 of the days while I was on campus in Singapore, I was able to somehow block out most of the rest of my life. The program was important enough for me that those I was close to at work/play knew to wait for me to reach them. But then life resumes and maybe more often than you expected, you always feel you could have studied just a little bit more to prepare a little bit better.

I won’t speak of averages - the vast majority of us finish in the expected 20 month period. There are exceptions - maybe 10% - who work out something different.

Now, while you can complete the program in under 2 years (aka “on time”) you are given 5 years to do it. Chicago wrote the book on Executive MBAs, so they know what, hey, “life happens”. A dozen of my classmates were cycled back to their home countries (US usually) during my term. We took in 8 people from the Europe and US campus who were moved to Asia. Work gets busier, life gets more complicated - some friends had to take a break in the middle. One enterprising person worked it out so that he only attended one course a week instead of the scheduled 2 courses per week - so he was on track to finish his requirements in 3 AXP classes. To each his own - and as long as the school buys your reasons, they aren’t going to make it hard for you. (Far from it, the AXP program treats you like royalty - but that’s because you also pay a princely sum)

It’s much higher today than when I took it. Tuition should run you about US$ 100,000 (don’t take my work for it, check with the school). It includes textbooks, plus accomodations for that first week, final week and the summer term weeks. It does NOT include any airfare, or for your accomodations during the “regular” weeks.

Bear in mind, compared to the full-time program, where you give up about 2 years of work, this is a bargain, since you still are at your job. Such savings may not be meaningful if you run your own business, but the time factor would be.

Thanks a lot Gus for the great answer. Very interesting. You had me seriously contemplating how I might be able to work this out till the very end: US$100,000+. Yikes! For a 20-30 year old that’s not so bad as there’s plenty of time for the degree to pay for itself. But after age 40 and already possessing good advanced degrees, it may not make sense.

I hear you.

In that case, I would try to work in as part of a compensation package - maybe a hybrid 1/2 paid by company kind of thing. It depends on your industry, but the professional network you join is really fantastic, especially if you plan to spend a lot of time back in the US.

Age range in my class was 25 to 55 years old. Mean age was 34 with 12 years of work experience.

If you go to a decent school, you can pay that off in about 2-3 years. If you’ve got a family like me, you can pay it off in about 5yrs.

There are no hard and fast rules. But if you work for Big Co and they are supportive of this track (which isn’t such a stretch since after a certain level, HR is scratching their heads how to keep you happy without outright giving you cash), you would be expected to stay with the firm and look to move up soon after graduation. That would speed payback for the over-40 crowd.

Apart from the implicit value of the GSB student/alumni/faculty networks, there are explicit benefits - lifetime career coaches (each XP campus has a fulltime career coach who is expected to be well networked with regional headhunters) and the consistently top-ranked career center (Businessweek ranking) among all elite b-schools.

A couple of years ago, they merged the XP Career Team with the Full-time programs team - it was kept separate in the past because the goals for the students was considered different before. XP students look to move up but stay in the same firm, while fulltime students look to jump ship and jump up. Globalization, the Internet (etc) has blurred the lines over the past few years - tho they still ask you to sign a waiver that absolves the school from blame if you actually leave your firm (kinda funny)

If you go to a decent school, you can pay that off in about 2-3 years. If you’ve got a family like me, you can pay it off in about 5yrs.[/quote]

Maybe. But I’ve already got a JD and have worked as a lawyer for 17 years. Unlike many/most of my classmates, I’m not a partner in a US law firm making mountains of money, but my present position is excellent and has extremely promising prospects for career advancement. Although I’m number 2 in the Legal Dept, I don’t believe I have a realistic chance of ever becoming General Counsel of my present company because it’s a huge local company and I barely speak Chinese. But otherwise things are looking very good.

In my present employment I’ve had lots of opportunities to work on big business matters, as well as legal matters, and have found them very interesting. I’ve also gotten to know various people with MBAs (mostly on top of an engineering degree) and have started thinking I enjoy business, wouldn’t mind going into management, and an MBA (on top of my JD and legal experience) would probably be a great way in.

But, would it pay off in 2-3 years or 5 years? I don’t know. As I said, my present path is already looking very good. Would an MBA definitely lead to a management position with substantially higher pay than a senior legal position? I don’t know. Maybe.

Then, for me there’s the issue of the huge time committment. Like you, I have a family and a very busy full time job. I’d love to earn an MBA, but given those huge costs (time and money) and my presently satisfactory path, I’m not sure it would be worthwhile.

Maybe in my next life.

If you go to a decent school, you can pay that off in about 2-3 years. If you’ve got a family like me, you can pay it off in about 5yrs.[/quote]

Maybe. But I’ve already got a JD and have worked as a lawyer for 17 years. Unlike many/most of my classmates, I’m not a partner in a US law firm making mountains of money, but my present position is excellent and has extremely promising prospects for career advancement. Although I’m number 2 in the Legal Dept, I don’t believe I have a realistic chance of ever becoming General Counsel of my present company because it’s a huge local company and I barely speak Chinese. But otherwise things are looking very good.

In my present employment I’ve had lots of opportunities to work on big business matters, as well as legal matters, and have found them very interesting. I’ve also gotten to know various people with MBAs (mostly on top of an engineering degree) and have started thinking I enjoy business, wouldn’t mind going into management, and an MBA (on top of my JD and legal experience) would probably be a great way in.

But, would it pay off in 2-3 years or 5 years? I don’t know. As I said, my present path is already looking very good. Would an MBA definitely lead to a management position with substantially higher pay than a senior legal position? I don’t know. Maybe.

Then, for me there’s the issue of the huge time committment. Like you, I have a family and a very busy full time job. I’d love to earn an MBA, but given those huge costs (time and money) and my presently satisfactory path, I’m not sure it would be worthwhile.

Maybe in my next life.[/quote]

I had classmates who did a full time in their late 30’s, 40’s who switched careers and did just fine. We had a whole cohort or people who were already practicing doctors. YMMV. If you want to get the MBA and do the same thing that you do now, then don’t bother. If you’re lookign to switch careers, then that is something else.

It would be a switch from Legal to Management.

Based upon my uncles, I would think that lawyers with sound business sense would be highly valued.

The question for me is whether the inverse – business persons with good legal sense (and skills) – would also be highly valued. I’m confident the answer is yes, though I get the feeling at least half of all those who earn an MBA have a background in accounting or finance or the like. I’m better with words than numbers; I hope that wouldn’t disqualify me, though I know I’d have to learn to feel comfortable working with numbers.

The U Chicago sounds terrific. But, this maybe a very high caliber alternative that would require less commuting.

[quote]Practical.

In Tulane’s prestigious Executive MBA program, you attend class on weekends and earn the Tulane MBA degree in only 18 months. The rigorous curriculum prepares you for any business challenge, and we handle all the details, so you can focus on learning.

Global.
At Tulane, you will share a classroom with managers and professionals from diverse backgrounds, sharpen your analytical and strategic skills, and improve your business acumen—all within a global context. Whether you enroll in our New Orleans, Houston, Asia, or Chile programs, you will earn your MBA in less than two years. More importantly, you will gain the confidence and competence to conquer any career challenge.

World-Class.
Based in New Orleans, a city celebrated for its food, music, architecture, and diversity, Tulane is home to world-renowned faculty and world-class educational facilities. Tulane’s Executive MBA programs are fully accredited by AACSB International and consistently ranked among the top EMBA programs in the world by Business Week, Financial Times, US News & World Report, America Economia, and other leading business publications.[/quote]

[quote]Asia EMBA

Tulane’s 13-month Asia Executive MBA program offers mid- to upper-level managers and professionals the opportunity to earn a Tulane MBA degree while maintaining their full-time careers.

The accelerated program is designed for students who participate in select executive programs conducted at approved universities in Taiwan and mainland China. Approved universities include National Taiwan University, National Chengchi University, National Chiao Tung University, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, and National Sun Yat-Sen University in Taipei; Fudan University in Shanghai; Tsinghua University and Beijing University in Beijing; and Zhongshan University in Guangzhou. . .[/quote]

[quote]Required Postgraduate Studies in Asia
[b]A minimum of eight postgraduate business courses, totaling 24 credit hours, must be completed through an approved program at a recognized university in Asia. These required courses should cover the following seven areas:

Accounting
Economics
Finance
Marketing
Operations Management or Information Systems Management or Quantitative Methods
Organizational Behavior or Human Resources Management
Legal Environment of Business or Taxation or Property Rights Management [/b][/quote]
freeman.tulane.edu/emba/asia/default.htm

Several of the top officers in my company earned their emba’s through that program. I’ll look into it further. So, my primary question now is whether any of those universities in Taipei offer such classes in English. If not, I can cross that one off my list.

Why not go with a HK one like HKUST-Kellogg EMBA

You can even see the schedule/travel requirements for it. I think it’s a better combo than Tulane- and it’ll be for sure be in English.

Check out the FT article on Global EMBA 2006 article