Bomb, bomb, bomb, Bomb Syria


#1

So the goddam Limeys have upset the bomb train- never did trust those Euroweenie chips-eating surrender monkeys!

Meanwhile the gallant and stalwart French are, as ever, ready to stand up for liberty. Hope Congress is working on a motion to change the name to “Freedom muffins”. Take that, perfidious Albion.


#2

I was actually quite shocked when Britain stepped down. But if we wanna be peeved at anyone let’s be peeved at Russia.

Obama has made it pretty clear he’ll go ahead without the UNs backing, and so he should. Syria need to know it is NOT okay to use chemical warfare against it’s own people.

Go Tomahawk go!


#3

I guess Obama will be handing his Nobel back any day now. Since when did socialist Muslim liberal communists from Kenya start acting like right wing warmongers?


#4

[quote=“cfimages”]I guess Obama will be handing his Nobel back any day now. Since when did socialist Muslim liberal communists from Kenya start acting like right wing warmongers?
[/quote]
The Left has always sought to outbomb the Right. :s


#5

Waitin to watch the fireworks on CNN :popcorn:


#6

Just for clarity, are you saying that if instead of a chemical weapon it was just an old fashion bomb that killed all those people, our reaction should be different? That somehow the people who died recently from chemical weapons are somehow more dead than then 10’s of thousands that died before them from regular incendiaries?


#7

America drew a line in the sand with a madman.

Madman crossed the line.

Its pull down your pants and check your penis size time.

Being the first black president and backing out of this game is unthinkable.

Burn Damascus burn.

Payback for Driving Miss Daisy (with Arabic subtitles).

Obama went from ‘nice rube’ to Ice Cube


#8

Any punishment that is levied on Assad for poisoning Syrian children should be levied on the U.S. too for poisoning far more Iraqi children and then covering it up. Not likely in a world of might makes right though.


A man holds his ill son in Basra, Iraq shortly after his young daughter had died of cancer. The picture was taken in February 2011. The boy died of cancer a few months later.

[quote]UNITED NATIONS, Jul 17 2013 (IPS) - A long-awaited study on congenital birth defects by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Ministry of Health (MOH) in Iraq is expected to be very extensive in nature.

According to WHO, 10,800 households were selected as a sample size for the study, which was scheduled to be released early this year but has not yet been made public.

Many scientists and experts have started questioning the time delay in publishing the study, but there is another aspect that is a cause for concern among some health experts.

The report will not examine the link between the prevalence of birth defects and use of depleted uranium (DU) munitions used during the war and occupation in Iraq, according to WHO. . . . Susanne Soederberg, a professor and Canada research chair at Queen’s University who is also waiting for the study to be published, did not mince words.

“I strongly believe that the WHO, like most international organisations, is not a neutral body, but is influenced by the geopolitical powers of its members,” she told IPS. “So, yes, there is reason why a group of very smart scientists are not exploring the ‘why’ question in their study.”[/quote]

ipsnews.net/2013/07/whos-ira … causation/


#9

Looks like the Poms have learned the “Blair lesson.” Obama, however, hasn’t learned the “Bush lesson.” What? 18 trillion in debt? Chump change! No cash, no allies…no problem! Now let’s go bomb some Ay-rabs! Hope the Nobel Committee is choking on their Freedom Meatballs…


#10

Credibility is everything. I would be inclined to believe Obama and Kerry if they were actually credible. I for one have been lied to a few too many time to accept their, “WE KNOW” statements with much than a thinly veiled skepticism.


#11

If Syria were in Africa or on the Korean Peninsula it could do pretty much anything it wanted to its people and the world would little note nor much care:

algemeiner.com/2013/07/03/th … us-to-act/


#12

dailymail.co.uk/news/article … asion.html I think David Cameron didn’t want to be remembered like this man


#13

Tony Blair justifies himself by asking what the world would be like if Saddam Hussein were still in power today. If Saddam Hussein were still alive and in power today he’d be almost 80 years old.


#14

Tony Blair justifies himself by asking what the world would be like if Saddam Hussein were still in power today. If Saddam Hussein were still alive and in power today he’d be almost 80 years old.[/quote]

And Bob Mugabe is closer to 90. Your point???


#15

With this president being the most political we’ve had, there is a political calculation behind everything. Just like when Clinton ordered a strike against some insignificant factory in Africa as the Monica Lewinsky allegations were publicized. The big political issue Obama seeks relief from now is upcoming talks of government shutdown over his irresponsible budget intransigence. Republicans (Boehner) are dumb enough to go along with his incessant games.

Some see Syria as edge for Obama in fiscal showdown

[ul][color=#000080]U.S. military action in Syria could give the White House an advantage in the looming fiscal showdown with congressional Republicans, according to defense and budget experts.

They said the Syria crisis could boost calls by President Obama and defense hawks to reverse the automatic spending cuts to the Pentagon known as sequestration.

Steve Bell, a budget expert at the Bipartisan Policy Center, said if the U.S. moves forward with military action, it will underline the arguments of those who say keeping the sequester in place impairs U.S. military readiness.

“I think it has the possibility of advancing fiscal talks, I really do,” he said.

He argued that if strikes against Syria are launched, it will be “very, very difficult to insist” on the defense sequester.
“Under those circumstances, I can see a [2014 continuing resolution] that would contain full funding for defense,” he said.

The White House has been banking on defense hawks within the GOP breaking ranks with Tea Party conservatives and embracing a debt deal that includes some higher taxes and reverses cuts to domestic programs.

Their hope is that the cuts to the Pentagon will grow so painful, some defense-minded lawmakers will accept more tax revenue as part of a deal to end the defense cuts.

That effort needs a shot in the arm.

Obama faced a setback this week when secretive White House debt talks with Senate GOP centrists were suspended indefinitely over the issue of new taxes…[/color][/ul]


#16

Russia sharply steps up criticism of U.S. over Syria

[ul][color=#000080]MOSCOW – Russia dramatically escalated its denunciations of American threats to attack Syrian military targets on Saturday, as President Vladimir Putin called the arguments about chemical weapons that underlie the U.S. case “utter nonsense.”…

Speaking out for the first time since an alleged chemical weapons attack near Damascus on Aug. 21, Putin called on President Obama to find a nonviolent way out of the crisis.

“I would like to address Obama as a Nobel Peace Prize laureate: Before using force in Syria, it would be good to think about future casualties,” Putin told Russian news agencies in Vladivostok…

The White House argued Friday that intelligence shows more than 1,400 people died from exposure to chemical weapons in an attack carried out by the Syrian military.

Putin said he was sure the attack was the work of rebels trying to provoke international — and especially American — involvement in the Syrian conflict. The regime of Bashar al-Assad, he said, would have had no reason to use chemical weapons at a time when it had gained the upper hand in the fighting.

“While the Syrian army is on the offensive, saying that it is the Syrian government that used chemical weapons is utter nonsense,” Putin said.

On top of that, he said, the Obama administration’s “claims that proof exists, but is classified and cannot be presented to anybody, are below criticism. This is plain disrespect for their partners.”[/color][/ul]

I have no idea about the quality of the intelligence (which turned out contrary with Bush as well incidentally), and I usually take what Putin says with a grain of salt, but that part about the secrecy really hits a chord. What’s with the secrecy thing and Obama? Correct me if I’m wrong, but Bush shared top-secret intelligence with our allies to convince them. Why is Obama’s secrecy supreme and sacrosanct, the excuse of secrecy being used against investigating Benghazi or knowing visitors to the White House or evidence for strikes in Syria, whereas ours are so disposable? Putin’s concern for intelligence-sharing with partners is certainly appropriate.


#17

Americans needs to pull together and vote Democrat next time and keep the warmongers out of the oval office :2cents:


#18

Tony Blair justifies himself by asking what the world would be like if Saddam Hussein were still in power today. If Saddam Hussein were still alive and in power today he’d be almost 80 years old.[/quote]

And Bob Mugabe is closer to 90. Your point???[/quote]

My point is that if Saddam Hussein were the leader of some country in Africa vigilantes with ulterior motives posing as selective humanitarians would little note nor much care what he did and he’d be a toothless septuagenarian pushing 80 today.


#19

So, who is in there now? :ohreally:


#20

DULCE ET DECORUM EST(1)

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares(2) we turned our backs
And towards our distant rest(3) began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots(4)
Of tired, outstripped(5) Five-Nines(6) that dropped behind.
Gas!(7) Gas! Quick, boys! – An ecstasy of fumbling,
Fitting the clumsy helmets(8) just in time;
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling,
And flound’ring like a man in fire or lime(9) . . .
Dim, through the misty panes(10) and thick green light,
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.
In all my dreams, before my helpless sight,
He plunges at me, guttering,(11) choking, drowning.
If in some smothering dreams you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil’s sick of sin;
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud(12)
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest(13)
To children ardent(14) for some desperate glory,
The old Lie; Dulce et Decorum est
Pro patria mori.(15)

Wilfred Owen
8 October 1917 - March, 1918

It is a sweet and fine thing to die for ones country.

It was the ode that heralded in the first World War.

However, this poem had a profound affect on the unfolding of military strategy and the banning of the use of chemical weapons. So much so that chemical weapons threatened the very existence of standing armies. That is why they are band, not because they kill people but because it is hard to motivate soldiers into that reality. They like nuclear weapons have the X factor. That is what makes them the red line weapon. It is hard to find soldiers to go up against them. Not that you cannot of course, but it certainly puts a hole in your recruitment posters.

Reality

Vesus