Born in Taiwan, left at 9, Male US passport trying to regain Taiwan Passport

Dear All,

First time posting so please bear with me on this and my apologies in advance if this has been asked before. I am trying to re-apply for a Taiwan passport which was forced to be surrendered upon gaining US citizenship and I only have an ID number. I currently live in LA but am planning on working in Taiwan within the next 3 months.

My situation is as follows:
I am male, born in Taiwan in 1971, left when I was 9. Gained US citizenship at 15.
I have my Taiwan ID number as well as a copy of my family’s Taiwan 戶口謄本with my name listed.
No copies of my old Taiwan passport exist.

I was told that I needed to fill out a document in LA called 入國證明書申請表 and use this to gain entry into Taiwan. However, on the application, there’s a section that says “檢附資料” 1. 護照遺失報案紀錄 2. 相片(2張) My question is, what do I do? My passport wasn’t lost nor stolen so I can’t possibly give them any type of police report. And what other types of information are needed in order to apply for this 入國證明書申請表?

Any help on this matter would be most appreciated.

[quote=“rcintw”]Dear All,

First time posting so please bear with me on this and my apologies in advance if this has been asked before. I am trying to re-apply for a Taiwan passport which was forced to be surrendered upon gaining US citizenship and I only have an ID number. I currently live in LA but am planning on working in Taiwan within the next 3 months.

My situation is as follows:
I am male, born in Taiwan in 1971, left when I was 9. Gained US citizenship at 15.
I have my Taiwan ID number as well as a copy of my family’s Taiwan 戶口謄本with my name listed.
No copies of my old Taiwan passport exist.

I was told that I needed to fill out a document in LA called 入國證明書申請表 and use this to gain entry into Taiwan. However, on the application, there’s a section that says “檢附資料” 1. 護照遺失報案紀錄 2. 相片(2張) My question is, what do I do? My passport wasn’t lost nor stolen so I can’t possibly give them any type of police report. And what other types of information are needed in order to apply for this 入國證明書申請表?

Any help on this matter would be most appreciated.[/quote]
I may not be any help to you at all, but I’m curious about your case. Answer if you will, knowing it may or may not help anyone here to help you.

I want to know how you “gained” your US citizenship when you were nine. Your parents or guardians obviously must have petitioned for your citizenship some how, and I wonder on what basis you were granted this citizenship. You didn’t likely just surrender your Taiwanese passport, but your Taiwanese citizenship, or it was surrendered on your behalf, because the US doesn’t allow dual citizenship. This is likely the crux of your problem. You still have an id number, but not rights to citizenship. I’m sure there is probably a way for you to gain your Taiwanese citizenship because Taiwan is very good about granting citizenship to those who have family ties to the island, but good luck with it.

Again, there’s nothing I can do or say to help you with any of this, and I’m only asking out of curiosity. I’m partly curious because my own son has dual citizenship, but he gained both at birth.

This is patently false. The United States does not require renunciation of existing nationalities as part of the naturalization process. rcintw did not have a surrender a Taiwanese passport upon gaining US citizenship; the US does not request it nor does Taiwan require it. The only thing he would have to “surrender” would be his US green card. see travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_t … _1753.html

rcintw, please ask TECO directly on how you should deal with this situation. You are not alone in misplacing your passport. You should ask them whether it is necessary for you to file a police report, and if so, exactly what to put into the police report.

This is patently false. The United States does not require renunciation of existing nationalities as part of the naturalization process. rcintw did not have a surrender a Taiwanese passport upon gaining US citizenship; the US does not request it nor does Taiwan require it. The only thing he would have to “surrender” would be his US green card. see travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_t … _1753.html

rcintw, please ask TECO directly on how you should deal with this situation. You are not alone in misplacing your passport. You should ask them whether it is necessary for you to file a police report, and if so, exactly what to put into the police report.[/quote]

Really? All my Indonesian, British, and Spanish friends who’ve gained US citizenship have had to renounce their native citizenship first, then go and get their native citizen ship back again after they became US citizens. This is several friends from each of these places and over several years.

From the State department:

U.S. law does not mention dual nationality or require a person to choose one citizenship or another. Also, a person who is automatically granted another citizenship does not risk losing U.S. citizenship. However, a person who acquires a foreign citizenship by applying for it may lose U.S. citizenship.

[quote=“hansioux”]From the State department:

U.S. law does not mention dual nationality or require a person to choose one citizenship or another. Also, a person who is automatically granted another citizenship does not risk losing U.S. citizenship. However, a person who acquires a foreign citizenship by applying for it may lose U.S. citizenship.[/quote]

Okay. Thanks.

My brother and I both lost our passport years ago. Earlier this year, both of us decided to apply for replacement passports. My brother went through the Taipei Economic and Culture Office in Washington D.C. and were able to obtain the replacement passport.

I did not have enough time to process the replacement passport before going to Taiwan so they told me to go through the same route that you were told to pursue. I went to the police station in Houston to report a lost passport and they gave me a little piece of paper said that I lost my passport. The Houston Taipei Economic office was very helpful and walked me through every step. No problem at all.

The problem came when I was in Taiwan. They could not find my old passport image in Taiwan. My husband went to the Houston office and Houston was able see my old passport image and my old records. I was at the Kaohsiung passport office. They tried to tell me that I have to go to the Taipei office. My cousin helped me by harassing the passport office to issue the passport to me.

My advice is if it is possible get the replacement passport in US if you can. Call the Economic office and ask very specific questions. Houston office was very friendly, I hope LA office has the same attitude.

US allowed dual citizenship. My family members carry two passports to Taiwan and have both passports stamped when we enter and leave Taiwan.

There are no provisions in US law or Taiwanese law which require you to renounce your Taiwanese citizenship or even to surrender your Taiwanese passport in order to obtain US citizenship. Where is your Taiwan passport? :ponder:

This is patently false. The United States does not require renunciation of existing nationalities as part of the naturalization process. rcintw did not have a surrender a Taiwanese passport upon gaining US citizenship; the US does not request it nor does Taiwan require it. The only thing he would have to “surrender” would be his US green card. see travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_t … _1753.html

rcintw, please ask TECO directly on how you should deal with this situation. You are not alone in misplacing your passport. You should ask them whether it is necessary for you to file a police report, and if so, exactly what to put into the police report.[/quote]

Really? All my Indonesian, British, and Spanish friends who’ve gained US citizenship have had to renounce their native citizenship first, then go and get their native citizen ship back again after they became US citizens. This is several friends from each of these places and over several years.[/quote]
In the US, there’s a verbal declaration of non-allegiance to other countries given in the courtroom at the end of the naturalization process, but the US government doesn’t ask for proof of formal renunciation of citizenship like Taiwan’s government does, so most naturalized citizens retain their passports and become dual citizens.

Also not true that British Citizens have to renounce first to get US nationality as there is no such requirement. Indonesia does not allow dual nationality and neither does Germany ( outside of EU countries ) Belgium Denmark Spain and many other countries. Many people who renounce cannot get their citizenships back if they renounce or obtain citizenship of other countries.

The OP never lost his ROC Nationality just doesn’t have his expired ROC passport. His passport was given to the US government He is an ROC citizen as he has his ID card. He just needs to get a new ROC Passport and return to Taiwan and re-register on the Hukou and household registration. So probably the OP was not given his old passport by his parents as he was a child at the time and passports were only valid for 5 years for children. Expired and never renewed is most likely what happened.

Housecat your son was not born with dual nationality. You had to apply for one of those citzenships by descent. If your son was born in Taiwan he wasn’t a US citizen until you applied for his US Nationality. If he was born in the USA he didnt get ROC Nationality without applying for it.

My husbands son was born in Taiwan but he didnt get his Australian Nationality the day he was born, he had to apply for it through the Australian Consulate Genreral in Hong Kong and after he got the citizenship documents then he could apply for the passport. Before 2002 Australia also did not allow dual nationality so Australian Citizens who applied for citizenship of another country lost their Australian Citizenship. But now they can have multiple citizenships. Children born outside of Australia to Australian Citiizens do not automatically get Australian Citizenship. Same for USA citizens. If the parents never applied those children would not be citizens of their parents country.

So if we have more children our children would be able to apply for Australian and ROC Citizenship,