Can I get ROC citizenship?

Hello. Before the haters jump on, let me just say I freely admit to being a crafty SOB who hates bureaucracy and loves to screw government as much as possible.

Let’s say there’s a guy named Bob. Bob was born in mainland China and immigrated to San Francisco when he was 4. Bob is now a naturalized US citizen and his PRC passport, of course, expired long ago. Bob has to travel to mainland China on business often. The mainland’s travel restrictions (only double entry visas, day-long queues, screaming old Chinese people at the consulate) have driven him up the wall. The extortionate fees don’t help the situation at all.

Could Bob theoretically apply for and get a ROC “Overseas Chinese” passport? Bob is clearly of Chinese descent, and if it helps, his grandparents were KMT members (before they were arrested and thrown into labor camps, but thats another story), though he has never set foot in the ROC (or any of the ROC territories, like Mongolia and Arunachai Pradesh).

If Bob has a ROC Passport ($36), Bob could enter China on a the Taibaozheng, and pay only 100 RMB a pop at the airport, as opposed to the $130 and the day-long queue at the consulate.

Would Bob be conscripted for military service? Bob’s company would be terribly distressed if Bob failed to return due to being drafted.

Bob can [color=blue]renounce[/color] his US nationality and become an ROC citizen.

SO Bob won’t be returning to the US to live in anycase.

Of course the army would love to have you too.

No Taiboa for those Overseas Chinese as you need a Household registration and ID card to get a Taibao.

No 100rmb at the airport either Bob… Nothing at all

So if you want to leech for convenience BOB, please come on over.

For those of us who have done the renunciation bit we’d all like to see you do the same too. :smiley:

yes welcome Bob, but if you want to avoid the draft, you could wait until you are 36 years old (or if you’ve over 36 like me, fortunately we are deemed far too decrepid to be a military use).

or if you want to avoid the draft, you could close the window.

seriously, giving up your US citizenship for a measly few bucks? especially when i am sure you could pay some immigration agent to do that waiting in line for you, or even, heaven forbid, an illegal immigrant?

especially when you’re getting a citizenship of a country no-one recognises as a country in return? :loco: :loco: :loco:

Well I recognize it, and so should you.

[color=#800040]Moderator’s question: What does the United Nations say?[/color]

Yes Bob should be drafted… good idea !

Not worth the trouble Bob :no-no:

But it will be REALLY interesting to see Bob in the military.

If you’re under 36 and applying for a ROC passport / renouncing US citizenship, are you going to have to serve in the military for the first 1 - 2 years of your stay? I’m confused when I hear “draft” if that means mandatory service most Taiwanese do after high school, or if it refers to the obligation to serve should the country go to war (like in the US).

Thanks for the clarification.

[quote=“rct288”]If you’re under 36 and applying for a ROC passport / renouncing US citizenship, are you going to have to serve in the military for the first 1 - 2 years of your stay? I’m confused when I hear “draft” if that means mandatory service most Taiwanese do after high school, or if it refers to the obligation to serve should the country go to war (like in the US).

Thanks for the clarification.[/quote]

It means you have to serve in the military.

As a side note for the OP, wikipedia seems to state that it is possible to obtain the ID card without having hukou:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republic_o … ation_Card

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nationalit … t_of_abode

But these statements aren’t sourced, so I don’t know if this is true or not. If it is true, it implies that Bob can get the pass if he’s willing to give up his job and stay in Taiwan for one year on his overseas chinese passport and then get his ID card and serve in the military for two more years, without giving up his US citizenship.

That can’t possibly be right.

Taiwan, to my knowledge and I’m no expert, does not allow dual-citizenship (maybe it does for ethnic Chiese, I dunno), reason enough not to want to do it.

It’s not just because you lose your own and the protections of your own country, but also because the Taiwanese citizens do or may have problems travelling. From what some nationals have told me, they can’t go into certain countries or must obtain special visas.

Mainland China pushes its weight around again.

Taiwan allows Taiwan Nationals to hold as many foreign citizenhips as they like.
So yes Taiwan does allow Taiwan Nationals dual citizenship

[quote=“IceEagle”]
As a side note for the OP, wikipedia seems to state that it is possible to obtain the ID card without having hukou:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republic_o … ation_Card

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nationalit … t_of_abode

But these statements aren’t sourced, so I don’t know if this is true or not. If it is true, it implies that Bob can get the pass if he’s willing to give up his job and stay in Taiwan for one year on his overseas Chinese passport and then get his ID card and serve in the military for two more years, without giving up his US citizenship.

That can’t possibly be right.[/quote]

This appears to be correct. This is governed by the “Regulations of Residency and Settlement Approval for Hong Kong SAR and Macau Residents” - someone with an overseas passport merely applies for residency approval, and once granted can then stay in Taiwan for a year to get the ROC National ID.

However, looking at immigrationhk.com/tw.htm, the hurdles for those who want to get residency approval (and have no immediate family members in Taiwan) are significant. The easiest way (after having an immediate family member with household registration in Taiwan) is to enter Taiwan from HK or Macau on a student visa, study and graduate, go back to HK or Macau and work for two years, then try to go back to Taiwan. The second easiest way is to invest NT$5,000,000 in Taiwan (or at least have it in a Taiwan bank for a day or two).

There are also limits on what kind of Overseas Chinese can get Overseas Passports (e.g. most ABCs will not qualify), so getting citizenship and a TaiBaoZheng via this route is still very difficult.