Car Driving Around with Huge Chinese Flags blasting music


#21

I saw these cars when I first got to Taiwan (kabillion years ago). I wonder what their actual goals are? ‘Let’s raise awareness about CHINA!’. Hohum.


#22

I raise my fist in salute when it goes past because that’s what loud, imperialist music makes me feel. I’m an instinct kinda guy.


#23

I wonder if they ever meet. They’d probably get out and go for noodles and beer.


#24

Here in CA, the car would be pulled over and ticketed for noise pollution.


#25

this was spotted earlier today


#26

Freedom of speech is a beautiful, terrifying thing.


#27

Interesting that he drives a toyota.


#28

Not true! It’s standard procedure for the Chinese law enforcement to confiscate ROC flags whenever they see any.

A recent exemple was this Taiwanese girl who’s travelling by bike from Europe back to Taiwan. She had a little flag at the rear of her bike and hid it once she reached the border. Border patrol did inspect her luggages, found the flag and took it away.


#29

Interesting that he drives a toyota.[/quote]

More interesting if that pole and flag thing gets stuck in some power lines…


#30

Not true! It’s standard procedure for the Chinese law enforcement to confiscate ROC flags whenever they see any.

A recent exemple was this Taiwanese girl who’s travelling by bike from Europe back to Taiwan. She had a little flag at the rear of her bike and hid it once she reached the border. Border patrol did inspect her luggages, found the flag and took it away.[/quote]

Sorry to be such a stickler on these things, but do you have a link for this story? or any other story concerning confiscation of ROC flags in China? or evidence that it is “policy” or “standard procedure” to confiscate ROC flags in the PRC? It is my understanding that China is somewhat of a supporter of the ROC flag as long as it’s not displayed in international events (which would thereby distinguish the ROC as a separate entity from China). I have personally seen KMT and ROC paraphernalia prominently displayed in China on many occasions. ROC paraphernalia (with the flag on it) is somewhat popular at tourist shops and collectible shops throughout China. The PRC government even displays the ROC flag at events honoring Sun Yat-sen.


#31

[quote=“Taiwanguy”]

any other story concerning confiscation of ROC flags in China? or evidence that it is “policy” or “standard procedure” to confiscate ROC flags in the PRC

as long as it’s not displayed in international events (which would thereby distinguish the ROC as a separate entity from China[/quote]

aren’t you contradicting yourself? so you are saying it’s ok to confiscate flags during sporting events?

how about this news
appledaily.com.tw/realtimene … 11/184669/

or this report, where the Chinese Public Security gave them a ticket saying carrying the ROC flag is probably criminal?
tachr.blogspot.tw/2013/10/1012.html


#32

Taiwanguy: The ROC flag and KMT emblem are all over the SYS mausoleum in Nanjing, and the former Presidential Office there as well.

My understanding of the unwritten rules are: “It’s OK to fly the Republic of China flag except when it isn’t.” Or maybe that should be: “It’s never OK to fly the Republic of China flag, except when it is.”


#33

[quote=“hansioux”][quote=“Taiwanguy”]

any other story concerning confiscation of ROC flags in China? or evidence that it is “policy” or “standard procedure” to confiscate ROC flags in the PRC

as long as it’s not displayed in international events (which would thereby distinguish the ROC as a separate entity from China[/quote]

aren’t you contradicting yourself? so you are saying it’s ok to confiscate flags during sporting events?

how about this new
appledaily.com.tw/realtimene … 11/184669/

or this report, where the Chinese Public Security gave them a ticket saying carrying the ROC flag is probably criminal?
tachr.blogspot.tw/2013/10/1012.html[/quote]

I’m not at all contradicting myself. The claim made by the previous poster is that ANY display of the ROC flag is strictly forbidden on the mainland. I am saying that’s not the case. I have PERSONALLY seen ROC flags and paraphernalia quite frequently during my trips to the mainland.

Am I arguing that there are no instances in which PRC officials would seek to suppress its display? Of course not. I am sure that any attempt to use the ROC flag in protest to the PRC or in an effort to make some sort of political statement would be quickly suppressed. Do I think that’s right or okay? Of course not. The PRC government should be tolerant of others expressing their POV through free speech, but they are clearly not.

My initial post in this thread is not in support of any effort that the PRC makes to suppress free speech, but rather to make sure that the posts and criticisms are at least factual and not just hearsay. From my personal experience traveling around China, I find it very difficult to believe that it is “standard procedure” for Chinese law enforcement to confiscate any ROC flags they see. I think that is a very exaggerated statement.

Anyway, thanks for your links. In both cases, it seems like 公安 suspected that the flag was to be or being used in some sort of political statement. That’s wrong, and I strongly disagree with their intolerance of free speech, but I don’t think it is evidence that any display of the ROC flag in China is met with confiscation.


#34

[quote=“Hokwongwei”]Taiwanguy: The ROC flag and KMT emblem are all over the SYS mausoleum in Nanjing, and the former Presidential Office there as well.

My understanding of the unwritten rules are: “It’s OK to fly the Republic of China flag except when it isn’t.” Or maybe that should be: “It’s never OK to fly the Republic of China flag, except when it is.”[/quote]

You’re probably right. I think it largely depends on which 公安 officer sees it, and his mood on any given day.


#35

[quote=“Taiwanguy”][quote=“Hokwongwei”]Taiwanguy: The ROC flag and KMT emblem are all over the SYS mausoleum in Nanjing, and the former Presidential Office there as well.

My understanding of the unwritten rules are: “It’s OK to fly the Republic of China flag except when it isn’t.” Or maybe that should be: “It’s never OK to fly the Republic of China flag, except when it is.”[/quote]

You’re probably right. I think it largely depends on which 公安 officer sees it, and his mood on any given day.[/quote]

which means it isn’t ok to fly that flag, and those that do either get arrested, their flags confiscated, or have connection with the authority which allowed the display for the flag so people like you can say it is ok.


#36

I love the PSB. Had 6 of them come visit me and my fiancee in our hotel last month after midnight just to say hi and welcome us to town. They even brought a SWAT member in full gear with them. Bless their souls, it’s just what we wanted.


#37

Now that’s what I call going the extra mile.


#38

I hope they brought a pound cake and a bottle of rosé.


#39

The RoC flag is common at any museum/historical site related to the Republican era, but otherwise it’s pretty rare. Many people take it as a sign of Taiwanese Independence these days as evidenced by the Deserts Chang debacle, so it can be very controversial in China. All depends on the context.


#40

Spent a decade living in China and never really recall seeing the ROC flag outside of historical contexts. You see it on TV during films about the Sino-Japanese war, in museums dealing with that same period, or around sites like the Sun Yatsen mausoleum (though I remember the KMT symbols there as more prominent than the ROC flag). You occasionally see it on souvenirs sold at historical sites (e.g. t-shirts, in miniature on - sometimes comic - figurines of Chiang Kai-shek, etc.), but this is not common. I never recall seeing people walking around wearing ROC flag t-shirts.

That said, I had one displayed on the wall of my apartment for years and it never seemed to cause the slightest issue. Had I hung it from my balcony I doubt it would have lasted longer than a few days.