China to bar people with bad 'social credit' from planes, trains


#1

The future is now.

Or the eerie Black Mirror Season 3 Episode 1 “Nosedive.”


China’s Social Credit System
#2

We cannot on the one hand lament crass behavior among Mainland Chinese, yet on the other hand equally lament such measures. I am all for it. People will only learn once their rotten manners land them on the no-fly list.


#3

Are you serious? That thing is so wrong. Maybe I’m coming from different world… Social ratings!!! That sounds like a bad joke… To understand how and why is so wrong have to understand essence of liberty. We build civilization and organize countries and laws that helps us to live without fear of others… This is evolution backwards. This will create two classes, one with good ratings who will never be able to relax in way to keep their rating good and other one who will stuck with bad credit will be explored by first group.


#4

Those are all good points, yes… but have you ever lined up for a train in Beijing during “rush hour” and barely lived to tell the tale? Or gotten immersed by the chaotic dregs of a mainland tour bus while checking out a previously tranquil site right here in Taiwan? :thinking:


#5

Not a “thing” in communist China.


#6

There actually was something like this in the UK, its called an ‘asbo’ antisocial behavior order. The basic assumption was that you cant plead liberty and be a @#$%& at the same time.


#7

I think it’s quite different. The UK order was directed by a court based on your criminal activity.

The Chinese situation is government ranking you without any direction from court that was based on criminal activity.


#8

actually no, it was not based on criminal activity, that is the whole idea, it was based on being antisocial, if you caused a nuisance.

like the guy who was banned from dressing like a school girl and a homeless guy who was banned from faking illness to get off the street. here are examples. http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-10790872


#9

Here are some common ASBO “offenses”
Vandalism and the dropping of litter
Dealing drugs and drug use
Drinking alcohol in the street
Verbal abuse including hoax telephone calls
Offensive text messages and phone calls
Rowdy behaviour; for example playing loud music constantly

“These orders can be placed on children as young as 10 years old and are not criminal offences.”

http://www.civilrightsmovement.co.uk/anti-social-behaviour-orders-asbos-your-rights.html


#10

Are we trying to prove that China isn’t too bad or that the UK is trash? What’s the pc narrative here?


#11

As long as it isn’t used for political reasons, I don’t see the problem. :exploding_head:


#12

Seriously?


#13

Greetings, fellow citizen.

We have noticed that your aunt’s sister, who posted some inappropriate commentaries about the government, is still in your contact list in WeChat.
In addition, your resent purchase of Nintendo Switch shows that you are not devoted to your work enough.
So, as an effect, your social credit is deducted 20 points, and now you are not allowed to take high speed trains anymore. Have a nice day.


#14

Nope


#15

Not to nitpick the joke, but wouldn’t his aunt’s sister… be his mother? :flushed:


#16

In that case, Hsinhai, when they lower your score because of your negative comments about Communist martyrs of the 1940’s, will you agree with their decision?


#17


#18

The same could be said about law in general. You have those who abide the laws, and then you have those who end up fined or in jail with a criminal record. Finding a job with a criminal record is almost impossible in many industries. The same goes for credit ratings. Good luck applying for a credit card if you constantly default on bills.

The reality of mankind is that liberty without sanctions for those who abuse good faith will victimize well-mannered and law-abiding citizens.

These comments were a necessary part of my united front assignment in the period before national unification. Obviously I would not make such wild claims in the Mainland of China or after national unification.


#19

Thanks for your honesty, but that doesn’t answer the question.

If reports in western media are correct, there is no appeal mechanism. In that case, you may think your activities are protected because of X, but the people running the system may think otherwise. If you raise an objection, that presumably constitutes “picking quarrels and provoking trouble” or something similar. If you find yourself in that situation, will you still agree with the system?

Also, you make it sound like the system doesn’t take activities outside the mainland into consideration. Even if that’s the case now, there’s no strong reason for it to remain so.


#20

The maximum penalty they mention is a one year ban. Try calling in a bomb scare smoking and throwing a drunken fit on a train or plane in any country and see how it works out.