Chinese language + buxiban job

From my reading thus far, I’ve seen mixed opinions/info on what buxiban employers/administration think of foreigner teachers with Chinese language ability and in what ways it matters/doesn’t matter…

In the classroom is speaking Chinese usually forbidden? Does it depend?

Outside of the classroom, speaking with administration, will Chinese or English be used, or both? What’s typical if the foreign teacher does speak Chinese?

What is the typical employer attitude towards Chinese speaking foreigners? Is it a major plus, like it or dislike, or are most indifferent?

I’ve read that most credentials are irrelevant; should I assume my degree in Chinese language will be met with indifference? (This is my impression…)

At my school Chinese is actively discouraged. You will always be responded to in English no matter how bad their Chinglish is.

I have had a few compliments that my language skills are good but it is not the Taiwanese way to engage with foreigners in their language. You are here for your English. Full stop.

[quote=“Milkybar_Kid”]At my school Chinese is actively discouraged. You will always be responded to in English no matter how bad their Chinglish is.

I have had a few compliments that my language skills are good but it is not the Taiwanese way to engage with foreigners in their language. You are here for your English. Full stop.[/quote]

Would you say your situation is typical of most from what you’ve heard?

When I traveled in Taiwan I did not have the experience of Taiwanese being unwilling to speak Chinese with me. In fact, I found them even more willing than mainlanders.

But I am curious if this is different in the workplace - particularly if the job is teaching English. I’d really like to create a Chinese speaking environment for myself in Taiwan…

Any other experiences/opinions from others?

Thanks everyone in advance!

I worked at Kojen, and in the classroom Chinese was forbidden. I even had parents complain when the only Chinese I used was to explain a vocabulary item. However, outside of class, I think if you just kept speaking Chinese to your Taiwanese coworkers, even if they responded in English, they would eventually get used to it and start speaking Chinese with you. Speaking Chinese to the kids even during break or after class was frowned upon, however.

My boss speaks with me in Mandarin, sometimes at a quick rate. I get more accolade for speaking Mandarin outside the classroom.

I’ve told my students that they have a whole country outside of my classroom in which they can use their Mandarin or Taiwanese, and they have almost nowhere in Taiwan where they can speak English. I personally like an English-or-nothing policy, if only for that reason. But I also (gasp!) think output and pressure to occupy “the floor” of a conversation is an important feeling to know and conquer, because I don’t treat my students like they’re SQL programs or (a la CI theories) super-SYSTRANS and give them autobiographical questions or questions on already covered material.

[quote=“ehophi”]My boss speaks with me in Mandarin, sometimes at a quick rate. I get more accolade for speaking Mandarin outside the classroom.

I’ve told my students that they have a whole country outside of my classroom in which they can use their Mandarin or Taiwanese, and they have almost nowhere in Taiwan where they can speak English. I personally like an English-or-nothing policy, if only for that reason. But I also (gasp!) think output and pressure to occupy “the floor” of a conversation is an important feeling to know and conquer, because I don’t treat my students like they’re SQL programs or (a la CI theories) super-SYSTRANS and give them autobiographical questions or questions on already covered material.[/quote]

Sounds like it’s all up to how stubborn you are, and really how good your Chinese is. My Chinese teacher from high school said I’ll likely have to work hard to create a Chinese speaking environment outside of the classroom/in life in Taipei or elsewhere in Taiwan – but it’s totally doable.