Chinese military receives a 17.8% budget boost

The PLA thanks Chen Shui-bian for his hard work on this account.

More seriously, while Taiwan is clearly a target, there are realistic needs to boost Chinese military spending. Paychecks for servicemen will be bumped up on average 20% with this budget increase. As the PLA continues to seek to improve in quality, this is a necessary requirement to attract greater numbers of college graduates.

But I will say 17.8% is a number significantly greater than what I would’ve expected. China’s military budget had been increasing at a pretty consistent rate over the past decade… and this increase is far above the mean.

nytimes.com/2007/03/05/world … l?ref=asia

don’t forget that this is only the reporte amount, not the actual amount spent, which is consistently far higher than reported (by estimates from Janes and Security international among others )

now if they sopent a fraction of that on education and health provision in the rural areas, which would be a good thing, all chinese would be better off. this way it keeps the money going around in the party circle…

Insane morons … needs for increase? To do what … protect China for an invasion of the Smurfs …?

[quote=“urodacus”]don’t forget that this is only the reporte amount, not the actual amount spent, which is consistently far higher than reported (by estimates from Janes and Security international among others )

now if they sopent a fraction of that on education and health provision in the rural areas, which would be a good thing, all chinese would be better off. this way it keeps the money going around in the party circle…[/quote]

China’s budgetary increases in these other areas are indeed higher than 17.8%. Central government’s budget allocation for education increased by 42%, for example.

To keep up with larger increases by its neighbors and potential foes.

To keep up with larger increases by its neighbors and potential foes.[/quote]

Hahahahahahah! :roflmao:

To keep up with larger increases by its neighbors and potential foes.[/quote]

Hahahahahahah! :roflmao:[/quote]

Are you laughing at yourself? Can you explain to me why Japan, given its size and needs, and which has a “pacifist” constitution, and is under the umbrella protection of the US, and is situated on well defended islands, has an annual military budget of $42 billion, compared to China’s $35 billion?

Nobody’s budget even comes close to the US arms budget. Is Canada or Mexico going to invade soon? Because I haven’t heard the news. Can you give one plausible justification for why China cannot have an arms budget as large as the US or say 4 times larger by population, if it so chooses (which it won’t)? Just because China was too poor to have a modern arms force up to now does not mean it should never have one. It’s pretty simple to understand, really.

[quote=“zeugmite”]

Are you laughing at yourself? Can you explain to me why Japan, given its size and needs, and which has a “pacifist” constitution, and is under the umbrella protection of the US, and is situated on well defended islands, has an annual military budget of $42 billion, compared to China’s $35 billion?

Nobody’s budget even comes close to the US arms budget. Is Canada or Mexico going to invade soon? Because I haven’t heard the news. Can you give one plausible justification for why China cannot have an arms budget as large as the US or say 4 times larger by population, if it so chooses (which it won’t)? Just because China was too poor to have a modern arms force up to now does not mean it should never have one. It’s pretty simple to understand, really.[/quote]

Hahahahahahaa! :roflmao: You’re so funny!

You see Japan has to defend itself against Japan but no I mean China and er um China has to remain strong to ensure that Richard Gere doesn’t invade Tibet which is actually part of India and I think they should give Turkestan back to the Irish and what about Vietnam eh? Eh?

Given that the average propensity to embezzle is rising at a CAGR of 1231241234.8902% a year in the higher echelons of the military, this new increase is merely keeping up with corrupflation.

hey, the gas price increased a lot in these last years, so the guys at the central committee have had problems in paying the bill of their incredibly efficient “volkswagen” (and I don’t mean the brand)…

I guess the USA and everyone else is going to need to get use to the PRC increased sphere of influence in the area.

“I guess the USA and everyone else is going to need to get
use to the PRC increased sphere of influence in the area.”
well I’ve pretty much gotten ‘use’(sic) to 900 missiles
aimed to kill me, hence the ‘nom de guerre’.

I don’t understand why the Chinese red bigshots need more than 900 fallus symbols … oh, sorry … micro dimpled dicks … forgot about that …

belgian pie,

Why does the USA have 10,000 nuclear warheads?
Like I mentioned you need time to adjust

ccpcannonfodder,

I’ll make sure they sing your praise in Minnan… :laughing:

"I’ll make sure they sing your praise in Minnan… "
noble gesture on your part - LO LAH!
(ducking the sarcasm )
but i live in a Hakka town.

China is expecting to increase government revenues in 2007 by 65 billion USD, or an increase of 13% from last year. The military budget increase is a small but necessary piece of that pie.

“China plans to increase spending on agriculture by 52 billion yuan this year to 391.7 billion, spend 10 billion yuan more on rural education and 2.8 billion yuan more on health, Wen said today. The government will abolish school fees for as many as 150 million pupils in rural areas, he said.”

No news flash here. China has been steadily building itself into a regional power for some time. In fact, the spend now is more meaningful since the reforms of the 90’s got rid of the most inefficient and wasteful parts. The spend in real terms even greater if you include how the CNY is undervalued and that much of the budget is not officially published.

Since China essentially believes it is a power on the rise, and that the US and the West are in decline “Peaceful Rise” is a cover for this re-establishment as a regional & global power.

That’s good. The biggest threat to China in the short term is still internal unrest in the rural populations.

ul

[quote=“almondbiscuit”][quote=“Elegua”]

That’s good. The biggest threat to China in the short term is still internal unrest in the rural populations.[/quote]

the biggest threat to the CCP, perhaps, rather than China itself?

these rural outbreaks could, perhaps, be better seen as a natural and just expression of frustration again their government by the rural population.[/quote]

If the CCP (by that I mean central gov.) handles it poorly, it is a threat to both. In any case the CCP as we know it today is dead in the long run.

And now the greens hold their breath…