Chinese Wordplay Collections

It’s pretty easy to find jokes that exploit lexical ambiguities, so this is going to be a tall order.

I need to preface this search with a story:
When I was dating my first Taiwanese girlfriend (in the US), we had a hot pot dinner at her Taiwanese friend’s apartment, and apparently their flurry of Chinese contained two conversations – gossip about someone, and directions on preparing the food. At some point, the friend said a sentence which my then-girlfriend took to be a statement of gossip, and so just nodded her head in agreement. But her friend repeated that same sentence to her and pointed to the ladle in the pot, indicating that she should stir the soup inside. Then they laughed because she had confused her friend’s sentence for a completely homophonic one.

I could guess that Chinese is more susceptible to this than other languages are, based on the larger surjection (don’t know how else to describe it) of sounds to words. I was curious to know if speakers of modern Chinese collect sentences like these.

Then I wondered whether sites or resources containing some examples of any of these things was readily available in Chinese:
[ul][li]puns,[/li]
[li]garden path sentences,[/li]
[li]entendres,[/li]
[li]paraprosdokia, and[/li]
[li]Spoonerisms.[/li][/ul]

Some of them are going to work radically differently from how they work in English, which is why I want to read them.

[quote=“ehophi”]
Then I wondered whether sites or resources containing some examples of any of these things was readily available in Chinese:
[ul][li]puns,[/li]
[li]garden path sentences,[/li]
[li]entendres,[/li]
[li]paraprosdokia, and[/li]
[li]Spoonerisms.[/li][/ul]
Some of them are going to work radically differently from how they work in English, which is why I want to read them.[/quote]

I’d love to find one too. All I can find are lists of chinese tongue twisters of the si shi si shi shi shi shi si shi shi si variety.

Check out laowaichinese.net/i-work-in-a-trash-dump.htm … below the level you’re looking for, but you could leave a comment.

What I love are half-baked Chinese language strategies to learn a certain strange local vernacular English. hi.baidu.com/kiong999/item/bd04f … de43c36a76

Newspaper headlines. Often when you see a character in a funny font or bolded or on fired, it’s a pun.