Chinglish list

I want to put together a list of Chinglish to make some posters for my classroom…
Don’t say I have write homework…
Say I did my homework.
Anyway, do any of you have some favorite Chinglish phrases for me to use?
And…any other good ideas about how to get rid of Chinglish?
Thanks

I am so boring.

Look through this thread for plenty of ideas:
[Common errors Chinese students make

Obviously some examples suit your purpose better than others.

You see…you see (Ni Kan)

or

Teacher …(insert name)

those are mine

I very like…
I have ever been to…

Big (heavy) rain

By the way, what’s the difference between “Chinglish” and “Changlish”??
One of my Chinese friends in Hong Kong refers to her English as “Changlish”.

Some of the gems my second graders just said today:

  • My home have this book. (Where’s the tearing out the hair emoticon for this one?)

  • I very like this book.

  • It’s on how many page? (for “It’s on what page?”)

  • It’s on what page? (for “What page is it on?”)

  • It’s on page three-four-six. (instead of “…page three hundred forty-six.”)

  • I reading finished.

Needless to say, today was a reading day. Moving right along…

  • Can I open the light? (To which I now respond, “Sorry. I’m not allowed to let you get on a ladder and open the lights [which are fluorescents inside a metal frame], but if you could turn on the lights, I’d appreciate it. Thank you.”)

  • You used too many glue. (I know, I know, a common error with ESL students on countable and uncountable nouns)

  • How to do/read/say? (for “How do you do/read/say it/this?”)

  • ‘Help.’ Aitch, Ee, Ello… (actually, it’s only one little girl, bless her, who is still saying the less known alphabet letters - you know…eh-ke-ssuh, ello, nnn…)

  • What I can do now?

  • (the general lack of ‘it’ as a “dummy pronoun(?)” like “I don’t have [it]” and “I want [it]”)

The thing is, my kids can self-correct or at least self-correct what they say if I give a hint or repeat the statement with a rising tone as if confused by meaning of their words because of error, but it still happens quite frequently…Especially the “My home have___”, even though they know the correct collocation is “I have ______ at home.” :help:

Another favorite of mine from the little kids, “I finish[ed] ‘washing your hands’” since all day long they hear “Wash your hands. Wash your hands. Have you finished washing your hands?” but never “I wash my hands. I finished washing my hands.” After I caught on for the reason why they say this, I began modeling the language. I would wash my hands with them and say, “I am finished washing my hands. Wanna smell?” Perhaps the reaction I got helped them remember my model…maybe not. :wink: But in any case, I began hearing “wash my hands” more often after I started telling them what I had done.

“He used my hair…” (pulled)
“He used me!” (He pushed me.)
“He used my this one!” (Don’t even want to know!)
“I want up!” (Pick me up)
“He touch-ee my little chicken!” ( :astonished: … not talking about Chicken Little… :astonished: )

When being handed something: “Give you.”

Oh, and I just clicked on one: Reply Topic

“What did you do last weekend?”
“Sleeping.”

[quote=“ImaniOU”]Some of the gems my second graders just said today:

  • My home have this book. (Where’s the tearing out the hair emoticon for this one?)

  • I very like this book.

  • It’s on how many page? (for “It’s on what page?”)

  • It’s on what page? (for “What page is it on?”)

  • It’s on page three-four-six. (instead of “…page three hundred forty-six.”)

  • I reading finished.

[/quote]

If that is the way your second graders speak, someody wasn’t kicking butt in the first grade, right?

Good eat.

I must to…

“It is on what page?”

“It is on what page?”

“It is on what page?”

Why does that sound correct to me?

Any grammar people wanna 'splain it to me?

[quote=“myury”][quote=“ImaniOU”]

  • It’s on what page? (for “What page is it on?”)

[/quote]

“It is on what page?”

“It is on what page?”

“It is on what page?”

Why does that sound correct to me?

Any grammar people wanna 'splain it to me?[/quote]

I think it is called “the interference of one’s mother tongue”. Pls confirm it with any books on linguistics.

Your students are Chinese and they just translate Chinese into English, directly.

However, in your case, I assume you have some knowledge of Chinese Language and it interferes your knowledge of your own language.

[quote=“nihonjin”]
I think it is called “the interference of one’s mother tongue”. Pls confirm it with any books on linguistics.

Your students are Chinese and they just translate Chinese into English, directly.

However, in your case, I assume you have some knowledge of Chinese Language and it interferes your knowledge of your own language.[/quote]

Ok, so I can understand that. My (feeble) Chinese is melting over into my English.

But, boy does that sound right to me. I know question words are supposed to go at the beginning of the sentence, but…

A: “Where do you live?”
B: “I live in your car, dude.”
A: “You live where!?”

A: “It’s on what page!?”

In my (confused) mind there’s an exasperated exception. Maybe it’s only conversational. Any grammarians out there want to learn me?

[quote=“Ramblin Rube”][quote=“ImaniOU”]Some of the gems my second graders just said today:

  • My home have this book. (Where’s the tearing out the hair emoticon for this one?)

  • I very like this book.

  • It’s on how many page? (for “It’s on what page?”)

  • It’s on what page? (for “What page is it on?”)

  • It’s on page three-four-six. (instead of “…page three hundred forty-six.”)

  • I reading finished.

[/quote]

If that is the way your second graders speak, someody wasn’t kicking butt in the first grade, right?[/quote]

Considering the fact that two of them are actually first graders who have high reading and speaking skills (they aren’t included in this list) and all are reading on at least a 2nd grade level (one first grader is on a 5th grade reading level) and doing a language arts program meant for native English speakers, I’m not all that worried about a few phrases, especially since they are doing self-correction. By the time they get to the 4th grade, most of these errors are gone.

How good is your 8-year-old students’ English, rube?

Stones and glass houses, my friend.

Stones and glass houses? You are too kind.

Actually kids in that age group (the ones I have spoon fed since day one) are very aware of the no-no’s I quoted. I just never let it get past the first or second time. The results are that they do quite well, thank you.

Sorry to disappoint you.