Chinglish?

#1

You tell me-
(Canadian Embassy - Renew passport)
“if you have been living in Taiwan for over three years,
you will be expected by Passport Canada to have a guarantor
and the form will likely be refused.”

  • if you have been driving in Canada at all, you will be
    expected by the Licence Bureau to have a licence
    and the driver will likely be fined.
#2

That doesn’t sound like Chinglish to me - it sounds like highly formal English. It uses present perfect continuous right, for one thing - most Chinglish signs would use one of several incorrect variants (or mix the variants together). Only the last line, “and the driver will likely be fined” sounds at all weird because it doesn’t quite specify the driver, but even that is borderline.

#3

Neither sentence makes sense but I suppose that is beside the point.

Who wrote it and what did they mean anyway?

#4

[quote=“old canuck”]You tell me-
(Canadian Embassy - Renew passport)
“if you have been living in Taiwan for over three years,
you will be expected by Passport Canada to have a guarantor
and the form will likely be refused.”

  • if you have been driving in Canada at all, you will be
    expected by the Licence Bureau to have a licence
    and the driver will likely be fined.[/quote]

Reads fine to me. Its the way the poster copied the text or types the text that makes it choppy and hard to read. This might help:

You tell me-

(Canadian Embassy - Renew passport)
If you have been living in Taiwan for over three years, you will be expected by Passport Canada to have a guarantor and the form will likely be refused.

If you have been driving in Canada at all, you will be expected by the Licence Bureau to have a licence and the driver will likely be fined.

See, much better :smiley:

#5

Clear as mud now. Thanks.

#6

I was being facetious :wink:

It really is gibberish. What was this in regards to? Looks like a warning about driving with an expired permit in Canada or something?

#7

Nonsense verse?

#8

Should be “Passport renewal” or “Renewing passport”

“…a guarantor. If not, the application is liable to be rejected.”

  1. “likely” is supposed to be used with positive outcomes, not negative.
  2. The way the sentence is worded, the form is “likely” to be refused no matter what.

(Anyway, I find it hard to believe that Canada would deny its citizens a passport renewal like that.)

“…have a licence. You are liable to be fined if you drive without a licence.”

Same problems as above, plus the switch from “you” to “the driver” (who may or may not be you).

(Do Canadians spell “licence” the British way or “license” the American way?)

Anyway, it’s probably not Chinglish (no characteristic Chinglish mistakes), but it is sloppy English.

#9

…eh?

#10

As for license, the Canucks seem to have gotten a pass on choosing whether they’d like to speak American or British English - usually it depends on whether you’re reading an older or younger writer. Personally I don’t have a problem with it but it is a little wacky.

#11

Jeez, hold on hold on.
First, yes the (partial) correct title is “Renewing a Passport”.
The business about the licence was just my analogy.
This is a quotation from the “Canadian Trade Office in Taipei”,

“For example, if you have been living in Taiwan for over 3 years, you will be expected
by Passport Canada to have a guarantor and the form will likely be refused.”
It just seems to me it should say “have a guarantor OR the form will lkely be refused.”
The sole intent of this post was to poke fun of the English at a Canadian web site
based in Taiwan by a Native Speaker who’s here to teach the locals correct English.

#12

[quote=“old canuck”]Jeez, hold on hold on.
“For example, if you have been living in Taiwan for over 3 years, you will be expected
by Passport Canada to have a guarantor and the form will likely be refused.”[/quote]

Maybe “the form” will indeed be refused. Maybe there’s a different form if you need a guarantor.

If that’s the case, the sentence is perfectly logical.

#13

[quote=“myury”][quote=“old canuck”]Jeez, hold on hold on.
“For example, if you have been living in Taiwan for over 3 years, you will be expected
by Passport Canada to have a guarantor and the form will likely be refused.”[/quote]

Maybe “the form” will indeed be refused. Maybe there’s a different form if you need a guarantor.

If that’s the case, the sentence is perfectly logical.[/quote]

It says you will be expected to have a guarantor. It then says that the form will likely be refused. It’s a mistake. That’s all, that’s it, there ain’t no more…

#14

" It’s a mistake. "
Yes, thank you bob, I believe you are correct.
To others, I’m sorry for the apparent tempest in a teacup.

#15

I’m sure there’s a better way to phrase that.

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#16

Just saw this in the restaurant menu of today’s lunch…


Wife can’t complain if I order some juice now… :crazy_face:

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