Class merging is spreading

I have been working at a school for one year and it has its good points and bad. However, today something happened which has made me think hard about whether i want to change jobs.

Today, i went in and there were three new students in my class.

Now, i normally wouldn’t mind new students in my class, but i know for a fact that one of the students is not qualified.

Students have to be 7 years old to go in this class and he will not be 7 until August 1st.

Is there anything I can do to stop the manager doing this to me?

What is next? More than 12 students in my class?

I assume you are trying to be funny? What is so bad about being 12 days early, or having more than 12 students in the class. If you are being serious, then get a grip. If you are trolling, then well done, you have started a retarded thread.

This is a joke, right? :eh:

On the off chance that this isn’t a troll post then:

A) If this is the first time it’s happened you’re lucky
B) If it bothers you this much never leave your current school, class merging is common and frequent out here. Your employers won’t give a damn about the age of the student or English level, kids are just bags of gold that need to be slotted together in a way which means less foreign teachers.

If the kid’s birthday is on August 1st, then in Taiwanese years he’s already seven.

Ok, so do you think I should bring it up with the manager or just suck it up?

If i bring it up, will it affect my relationship with my manager?

If i try and teach this kid, what are the chances of him keeping up? Should I prepare extra work for him?

[quote=“Mr Chen”]Ok, so do you think I should bring it up with the manager or just suck it up?

If i bring it up, will it affect my relationship with my manager?

If i try and teach this kid, what are the chances of him keeping up? Should I prepare extra work for him?[/quote]

Have you checked the kid’s English level yet?

I started the last class merging thread, and even I’m confused by the actual subject of dispute. Why would one assume that age grouping was a smart way to teach students, anyway? Abilities aren’t demarcated strictly by age.

You’re on a JFRV, so you have fewer risks, assuming that you’re otherwise employable.

It probably will.

That depends on the actual differences in difficulty. But you should not, by any means, offer simplified, specialized assignments to students who are not qualified for the coursework. It has two unpleasant effects.

1.) It makes other students resent that one of their own classmates is doing easier work, and they will complain that it’s unfair. It’s much more common for managers to prefer simplifying the coursework so that every student gets an A, even if they really don’t demonstrate proficiency with the materials provided. Don’t feel bad about perpetuating that system. They all grow up to be adults who barely speak English, and then they pay handsomely out of pocket to get the instruction that their buxibans didn’t provide for said political reasons.

2.) Assuming that you don’t lower the bar for everyone, specializing assignments for individual students encourages managers to continue their ethically dubious behavior. If the misplaced student can’t pass the benchmarks of a given course, let the managers explain to the parents why their misplaced student was not performing to the standards set by the coursework and course materials.

Indeed, yes. Please take it out on the kid by not helping him. That’s how to teach the management a real lesson. :bravo: (Please see recent, overlong thread on this same topic for any further comments you require.)

[quote=“Mr Chen”]Ok, so do you think I should bring it up with the manager or just suck it up?

If i bring it up, will it affect my relationship with my manager?

If i try and teach this kid, what are the chances of him keeping up? Should I prepare extra work for him?[/quote]

You need a reality check if you think this is out of the ordinary. God, I have six new kids in my K1 kindy class, who started a month before the end of the school year. They cannot even blurt out their name. Does the school care? Do I care? I just concentrate on the kids who have been in the class for a year.

You have one. Consider yourself in nirvana with seventy two virgins or whatever else rocks your boat.

For a class of twelve, eighty percent of the class could still score above eighty percent on a given assessment via this method. Some think that’s an acceptable rate of success for a class (wink, wink).

God forbid one not be spouted out of a system without the requisite skills, as long as he was “helped” along the way…

That figure is for a NEW teacher trying out a NEW way of teaching. You will not find the concept of a bell curve in TPRS, let alone the idea of just letting 20% of the class not get it, so your snark is pretty much lost here. Do you think the new kids in that class will score 80% without help, anyway? I doubt it. Big difference between accepting “only” an 80% score for a few students and just abandoning those same students.

You miss the point that children who get effective “help” usually catch up, while those who do not usually fail. But don’t let me rock your comfortable teaching world by mentioning the kids who aren’t going as fast as you’d like, or starting where you want.

[quote=“ironlady”]That figure is for a NEW teacher trying out a NEW way of teaching. You will not find the concept of a bell curve in TPRS, let alone the idea of just letting 20% of the class not get it, so your snark is pretty much lost here. Do you think the new kids in that class will score 80% without help, anyway? I doubt it. Big difference between accepting “only” an 80% score for a few students and just abandoning those same students.

You miss the point that children who get effective “help” usually catch up, while those who do not usually fail. But don’t let me rock your comfortable teaching world by mentioning the kids who aren’t going as fast as you’d like, or starting where you want.[/quote]
Not agreeing with Ehophi but Blaine Ray said this on moretprs in the yahoo groups "Because of the class situation, we can’t save everyone. Sometimes students are in class to get a grade. The welfare of the “one” is not more important than the welfare of the class.

Blaine"
I am still wondering why a teaching methodology needs a trademark.

Probably a Star Trek fan.

[quote=“ironlady”]

You miss the point that children who get effective “help” usually catch up, while those who do not usually fail. But don’t let me rock your comfortable teaching world by mentioning the kids who aren’t going as fast as you’d like, or starting where you want.[/quote]

This has pretty much been proven. If you refuse to help a child who is having problems learning, for whatever reason, you should not be a teacher. A teacher giving up on students because they can get away with it is immoral in my opinion. There are many ways to help students that are falling behind without holding the class back; I’ve seen it time and time again. Most kids just need someone to hold them accountable in a manner in which they can – with effort, though – succeed.

[quote=“E04teacherlin”][quote=“ironlady”]That figure is for a NEW teacher trying out a NEW way of teaching. You will not find the concept of a bell curve in TPRS, let alone the idea of just letting 20% of the class not get it, so your snark is pretty much lost here. Do you think the new kids in that class will score 80% without help, anyway? I doubt it. Big difference between accepting “only” an 80% score for a few students and just abandoning those same students.

You miss the point that children who get effective “help” usually catch up, while those who do not usually fail. But don’t let me rock your comfortable teaching world by mentioning the kids who aren’t going as fast as you’d like, or starting where you want.[/quote]
Not agreeing with Ehophi but Blaine Ray said this on moretprs in the yahoo groups "Because of the class situation, we can’t save everyone. Sometimes students are in class to get a grade. The welfare of the “one” is not more important than the welfare of the class.

Blaine"
I am still wondering why a teaching methodology needs a trademark.[/quote]

Accepting that one child may not “make it” is not the same as saying “I’m going to ignore these four kids who have been placed in my class, because I don’t care to make the effort to accommodate them.” And Blaine’s point is not to do nothing – it’s to accept that even when you HAVE effectively intervened, using professional methods and best intentions, sometimes the save just can’t be made.

The OP is hilarious. Worrying about a student that is 6 yrs and 353 days old… 12 students in a class…

FWIW I like to keep 7 and 8 yr olds separate from 9 and 10 yr olds. There is a difference in maturity and many of them are still learning the basics of being a student regardless of the subject. Like how to hold a pencil or their basic concentration abilities. Needs are just very different despite there only being a 2 yr age difference.

I can’t believe you’re all taking this seriously and wasting your time and energy.

Right…

I don’t know how to say this, but i was wrong. The student won’t turn 7 on August 1st, he will turn 8.

So what this means is that he is actually a year older than the rest. I feel so stupid, but I now have another problem.

Either I have a student who is too old in my class or I have 11 that are too young.

I really hope it is the first option, yesterday i was stressing over 1 student who is too young and i could actually have 11.

[quote=“Mr Chen”]Right…

I don’t know how to say this, but I was wrong. The student won’t turn 7 on August 1st, he will turn 8.

So what this means is that he is actually a year older than the rest. I feel so stupid, but I now have another problem.

Either I have a student who is too old in my class or I have 11 that are too young.

I really hope it is the first option, yesterday I was stressing over 1 student who is too young and i could actually have 11.[/quote]

The latest pedagogical thinking is to take an average of the class ages and teach to that level. Therefore, in your situation you would need to teach to an English level of ((11x7) + 8)/12. If you want to make it more scientific you could use the total number of months and divide this by 12. IMO that is getting a bit ridiculous, though.