Closed-Door Session of Senate

Senate goes behind closed doors to discuss GOP failure to address treason in its ranks

[quote]Senator Bill Frist, the majority leader, and other senior Republicans said that Senator Harry Reid, the Democratic leader, had blindsided them by invoking a seldom-used rule and that the maneuver had seriously damaged relations in the Senate, where partisan tension was already high.

“This is an affront to me personally,” an angry Mr. Frist said.

He said would find it difficult to trust Mr. Reid any longer.

“It’s an affront to our leadership,” Mr. Frist said. “It’s an affront to the United States of America. And it is wrong.”[/quote]

No, “wrong” is outing key CIA operatives specializing in weapons proliferation issues as part of a GOP-leadership smear campaign. “Wrong” is lying to the FBI and under oath in front of a federal grand jury. Apparently Mr. Frist doesn’t understand the difference between invoking Senate rules to discuss matters behind closed doors and the traitors running about his own party’s leadership. Of course, Frist also apparently doesn’t see anything “wrong” with his own little stock mess, and we already know that Delay sees nothing wrong with money-laundering.

[quote]But Democrats said last week’s indictment of Mr. Libby, the chief of staff to Vice President Dick Cheney, highlighted anew the need for the Senate to examine the administration’s handling of intelligence. They said the unusual demand for a closed session was made out of frustration with the refusal of the chairman of the Intelligence Committee, Senator Pat Roberts, Republican of Kansas, to make good on his February 2004 pledge to pursue such an investigation.

“We see the lengths they’ve gone to,” said Senator Richard J. Durbin of Illinois, the No. 2 Democrat, referring to the disclosure of a C.I.A. officer’s identity. “And now the question is, Will this Senate meet its responsibility under the Constitution to hold this administration, as every administration should be held, accountable?”[/quote]

Looks to me like the GOP leadership are acting as one in this whole thing, covering for the traitors as best they can. There was a time when I honestly felt that the parties disagreed on methodology but were at least unified by a basic notion that acting against the United States’ security was inconceivable. Now the truth comes out that the GOP leadership, pretty much across the board – doesn’t give a damn about the security of the U.S.

Are the Democrats starting to act like an opposition party?

Could be. Would be interesting if the Dems start using their new-found cojones to smack the GOP out of both houses. Frist’s comment says it all:

Apparently Frist equates the GOP leadership with “the United States of America,” which is flat wrong. The interests of a group of corrupt Republican party officials are not at all the same as those of the nation. The Dems are free to affront all sorts of bad leadership in an effort to protect the nation.

A helpful guide from Reid’s office on how the Republican leadership did everything possible to prevent examination of their lies during the buildup to war. Frist might cry like a little baby, but this closed-door session was long overdue.

[quote]For more than two years, Senate Democrats have pressed Republicans to address the misuse of intelligence. At every turn, Republicans have blocked efforts to investigate how intelligence was used in the run-up to the war in Iraq. Below details the long record established by Democrats to investigate this matter.

March 14, 2003 - Senator Rockefeller sent a letter to Director Mueller requesting an investigation into the origin of the Niger documents.

May 23, 2003 - Senators Roberts and Rockefeller sent a letter to the CIA and State Department Inspectors General to review issues related to the Niger documents.

June 2, 2003 - Senator Rockefeller issued a press release endorsing a statement made of the previous weekend by Senator Warner calling for a joint SSCI/SASC investigation.

June 4, 2003 - Senator Rockefeller issued a press release saying he would push for an investigation. Senator Roberts issued a press release saying calls for an investigation are premature.

June 10, 2003 - Senator Rockefeller sent a letter to Senator Roberts asking for an investigation.

June 11, 2003 - All Committee Democrats signed a letter to Senator Roberts asking for a meeting of the Committee to discuss the question of authorizing an inquiry into the intelligence that formed the basis for going to war.

June 11, 2003 - Senator Roberts issued a press release saying this is routine committee oversight, and that criticism of the intelligence community is unwarranted. Senator Rockefeller issued a press release calling the ongoing review inadequate.

June 20, 2003 - Senators Roberts and Rockefeller issued a joint press release laying out the scope of the inquiry.

August 13, 2003 - Senator Rockefeller sent a letter to Senator Roberts making 14 points about the investigation, asking to expand the inquiry to address the “use of intelligence by policy makers” and asking for several other actions.

September 9, 2003 - After press reports quoting Senator Roberts as saying the investigation was almost over, Senator Rockefeller sent a letter to Senator Roberts urging him not to rush to complete the investigation prematurely.
October 29, 2003 - Senators Roberts and Rockefeller sent a letter to Director Tenet expressing in strong terms that he should provide documents that have been requested and make individuals available.

October 30, 2003 - Senators Roberts and Rockefeller sent letters to Secretaries Rumsfeld and Powell, and National Security Advisor Rice expressing in strong terms that they should provide documents that have been requested and make individuals available.

October 31, 2003 - Senator Rockefeller sent a letter to Director Tenet asking for documents related to the interaction between intelligence and policy makers, including the documents from the Vice President’s office related to the Powell speech.

November 2, 2003 - Senator Roberts made statements during a joint television appearance with Senator Rockefeller claiming that the White house would provide all documents they jointly requested.

December 5, 2003 - Senator Rockefeller sent a letter to National Security Advisor Rice asking for her help getting documents and access to individuals.

January 22, 2004 - Senator Rockefeller sent a letter to Director Tenet asking for compliance with the Oct. 31 request for documents.

February 12, 2004 - Senators Roberts and Rockefeller issued a joint press release announcing the Committee’s unanimous approval of the expansion of the Iraq review, to include use of intelligence in the form of public statements, and listing other aspects of what became Phase II.

March 23, 2004 - Senator Rockefeller sent yet another letter to Director Tenet asking for compliance with the Oct. 31 request for documents.

June 17, 2004 - Senators Roberts and Rockefeller joint press release announcing the unanimous approval of the report.

July 16, 2004 - Committee Democrats sent a letter to Bush asking for the one page summary of the NIE prepared for Bush. The Committee staff had been allowed to review it but could not take notes and the Committee was never given a copy.

February 3, 2005 - Senator Rockefeller sent a letter to Senator Roberts outlining Committee priorities for the coming year and encouraging completion of Phase II.

August 5, 2005 - Senator Rockefeller sent a letter to Senator Roberts expressing concern over the lack of progress on Phase II and calling for a draft to be presented to the Committee at a business meeting in September.

September 29, 2005 - All Committee Democrats joined in additional views to the annual Intelligence Authorization Bill criticizing the lack of progress on Phase II.[/quote]